During the month of June, many will wear purple to shine a light on Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Despite being the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease is still largely misunderstood. For that reason, in 2014, the Alzheimer’s Association® declared June Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than five million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease. Worldwide, the organization reports there are at least 44 million people who live with Alzheimer’s or other dementias. As we are all too aware, those numbers are only expected to grow.

Often thought of as simple memory loss, Alzheimer’s is a fatal disease that kills nerve cells and tissue in the brain, affecting a person’s ability to remember, think, and plan. As it progresses, the brain shrinks due to loss of cells. As a result, individuals lose the ability to communicate, recognize family and friends, and care for themselves.

Scientists continue in their search to find treatments for the disease and others like it — dementia, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and more. In the meantime, learning more about these diseases and how to improve overall brain health is essential.

Did you know?
-In 2016, more than 15 million Americans gave 18 billion hours of their time, unpaid, to care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.
-Many people take on an extra job or postpone retirement in order to become a caregiver.
-Alzheimer’s disease is not normal aging. It is a progressive brain disease with no known cure.
-Alzheimer’s disease is more than memory loss. It appears through a variety of signs and symptoms.

What can you do for better brain health?
According to Cleveland Clinic, the following “brain-healthy behaviors” can help:

-Exercise at least three to five times per week.
-Engage in hobbies like puzzles, games, or other mental stimulation.
-Sleep for six hours or more per night.
-Connect with family and friends, and be sure to socialize regularly.

For more information on the above behaviors, visit ClevelandClinic.org. To learn more specifics on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, visit Alz.org.

Sources:
“6 Ways to Maintain Your Brain Health.” Health Essentials. Cleveland Clinic, 25 Aug. 2015. Web. 23 May 2017.
“Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month.” Healthy Brains. Cleveland Clinic, 16 June 2016. Web. 23 May 2017.

 
 

In recent months, Plymouth Harbor engaged in a competitive graduate student project with architectural students from the University of Florida’s CityLab-Sarasota campus. We worked with six students enrolled in a master’s seminar under the instruction of adjunct professor and celebrated local architect, Guy Peterson.

Through this partnership, the major project for the seminar was decided to be the porte cochère on the ground level entrance of our new Northwest Garden Building. As the main point of entry to the new building, the porte cochère’s design served as an important, hands-on project for the students. The students worked in pairs, forming three teams. From there, each team was given a period of three months to outline their design and a stipend of $1,000 for any materials needed for their involvement in the project.

Guy Peterson, George McGonagill (Plymouth Harbor’s Vice President of Facilities), and Lorraine Enwright (THW Architects), worked with the students to identify the scope of the project, budget, structural parameters, and a materials list that was consistent with that of the building. Becky Pazkowski (Plymouth Harbor’s Senior Vice President of Philanthropy) served as Program Advisor, while George served in the role of Construction Advisor.

At the completion of the project, students were asked to present their designs for consideration for a first, second, or third prize. The first place pair received a $5,000 prize, second received $3,000, and third received $1,000, each to be split between the two team members. The first place award was supported by residents Marie and Tom Belcher, and the second and third place awards were supported by resident Charles Gehrie.

On Friday, May 5, the students presented their respective projects to Plymouth Harbor’s selection committee, and were called back to Plymouth Harbor on Monday, May 8, for the award announcements.

Each design was impressive, and one stood out among the rest. Offering a sophisticated, modern design, the first place winner met the requirements for the scope of the project above all others (rendering pictured on page 1. Please note: this is only a rendering, not an actual depiction of the final product). In the coming months, we will incorporate much of this design into the final plans for the Northwest Garden.

Plymouth Harbor was proud to collaborate with these talented students, four of whom are now graduates with their Master of Architecture degrees.

Below are the student teams, by prize:

1st Prize: Gabriella Ebbesson & Miranda Crowe
2nd Prize: Elena Nonino & Olivia Ellsworth
3rd Prize: Brittany Perez & Francia Salazar

 
 

By: Becky Pazkowski

A Commitment to Memory campaign is in full swing, with current gifts exceeding $2,345,000! The Campaign Committee is reaching out to neighbors and friends to ask for participation in the campaign. Our goal is to reach the $3 million by November 1st, when we cut the ribbon for the Grand Opening.

The campaign support will give us the opportunity to build a premier program in Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming, unlike no other in our region. Specifically, $2 million will go into an income-generating Designated Investment Fund, from which we will draw off 5 percent (or $100,000) annually to specifically support the Educational Leadership ($40,000) and Inspirational Programming ($60,000). The balance of $1 million will support the capital resources needed to deliver these programs.

We hope you will all be interested in learning more about how you could be part of this campaign. We are able to take pledges payable over a five-year period and there are naming opportunities for you to consider, should that be of interest. If you have questions or would like to know more, please contact one of the Campaign Committee members or me (Becky Pazkowski) at Ext. 398.

Campaign Committee: Honorary Chairs: Gerry and (the late) Walt Mattson; Campaign Co-Chairs: Barry and Phil Starr; Committee Members: Marie and Tom Belcher, Joan Sheil and Bruce Crawford, Jack Denison, Charles Gehrie, Jean Glasser, Harry Hobson, Jeanne Manser, Ann and Ray Neff, Cade Sibley, Nancy Lyon and Tom Towler; Staff: Joe Devore, Becky Pazkowski.

 

As residents of Sarasota since 1997, Drs. Sarah and George Pappas have a strong tie to Plymouth Harbor. Sarah first became aware of Plymouth Harbor 30 years ago through Peggy Bates, a very prominent person at New College of Florida and in the Sarasota community. In 2012, Sarah joined the Plymouth Harbor, Inc. Board of Trustees. She ended her term in January 2017, and served as Vice Chair for two years.

In November 2017, when the highly-anticipated Northwest Garden opens, Sarah and George will join us on the Plymouth Harbor campus as residents of the new building. In the meantime, the two are busy “rightsizing,” selling their home, and preparing for the move into their new apartment — in addition to balancing their work life.

Sarah is the current President of the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation, and the past president of Manatee Community College (now State College of Florida). While Sarah plans to step down from her position at the Selby Foundation this coming June, she is sure to remain busy with her positions on the Board of the Sarasota Tiger Bay Club and her recent appointment to the Ringling Museum Board of Trustees.

George is a talented abstract artist whose work can be found at the Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art Gallery, and additional galleries in Tampa and New Smyrna Beach. In fact, in 2011, the Ringling Museum acquired one of his works, “Double Trouble,” for its permanent collection. In addition, up until last year, George served on the Board of Trustees at the Hermitage Artist Retreat.

Both Sarah and George spent much of their lives working in higher education. Sarah received her master’s degree in social science education from the University of South Florida and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Nova Southeastern University. Her career spans 40 years at three community colleges and the University of Central Florida. George studied at the Massachusetts College of Art, then continued his arts-related education with a master’s from Harvard and Ph.D. from Penn State University. After teaching at Northern Iowa University and Penn State, he taught art education for 27 years at the University of South Florida, serving 10 years as chair of the art department.

When asked why they chose Plymouth Harbor as their new home, Sarah responded, “The fact that Plymouth Harbor was a non-profit was number one for us. The practice of having residents on the Board was another attraction. Since both George and I spent our whole lives in higher education, it reminded us of the shared governance that is seen in universities and colleges. It really impressed us.”

What are they most looking forward to in living in the Northwest Garden and at Plymouth Harbor? The couple highlighted their brand-new apartment, and its 10-foot ceilings and plentiful wall space to display George’s artwork, as well as the Bistro just down the hall for entertaining friends. Additionally, George plans to use their second bedroom as his art studio overlooking their waterfront view, and together, they plan to take advantage of the many lectures, seminars, and activities that take place on campus.

As November quickly approaches, we certainly look forward to welcoming Sarah and George.
 
 

We have seen the structure of the Northwest Garden Building taking shape over the last few months. Now that we are familiar with the outside of the building, it is time to take a look on the inside. The following presentation, adapted for our Harbor Club members, discusses the building’s expanded assisted living, new memory care program, and how it will all come together. This video series will answer questions about the floor plan, amenities, dining options, training, programming, and much, much more!

A Look Inside with Harry Hobson, President & CEO, Brandi Burgess, Social Worker, and Becky Pazkowski, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy
Held on Thursday, April 27th at 3:30 p.m. in Pilgrim Hall

 

 

In March 2017, Plymouth Harbor published the Northwest Garden Building, a special edition of the Harbor Light resident newsletter. This publication is intended to provide the most up-to-date information regarding the Northwest Garden Building. Please note that the images used in this publication are only renderings, not exact depictions of what each space will look like in terms of décor, design, etc.

To view the electronic version of this publication, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

By: Becky Pazkowski

On March 17, at the third of the three-part Series A Look Inside, The Plymouth Harbor Foundation announced that over the last nine months a campaign committee has been working quietly to garner support for the Memory Care Program and Residence. The result of that early work is nearly 50 gifts that total over $2,337,000 toward the $3 million campaign! This announcement marks the official launch of the campaign, and we will work diligently between now and the November opening to raise the additional funds needed to meet the goal.

What will the $3 million support?
The $3 million raised in this campaign will establish a premier program in innovative care. The funding will be divided into two pieces: $2 million into a Designated Investment Fund, and $1 million for Capital Resources necessary to support programs. You will find these two components described in detail below.

Designated Investment Fund ($2 million)
This fund will generate income, from which we will draw $100,000 (or five percent) annually to support our two program components: Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming.

Educational Leadership ($40,000)
We have adopted the Positive Approach™ to Care (PAC), developed by Teepa Snow, whose techniques and training models are used throughout the world. Campus-wide training on this approach is ongoing for all of our employees caring for and interacting with persons with dementia. The premier program funded by the campaign will allow us to expand the training to include family members and the community-at-large. Educational Leadership and associated annual cost is defined by four components:

Staff Training ($10,000): We currently train all of our staff in the PAC model, and we will continue to do so on a semi-annual basis. With the additional funding from the campaign, we will be able to increase the frequency to quarterly, or even monthly training.

Family Support and One-On-One Counseling ($10,000): We plan to continue our family support groups, which have proven beneficial to those experiencing dementia with a loved one. With funding from the campaign, we will be able to offer one-on-one support and counseling.

Lecture Series ($15,000): We plan to bring local experts to share the latest in research and treatment of dementia. With the additional funding, we will be able to look beyond our own backyard to bring nationally- and internationally-known experts who will share their knowledge on the latest breakthrough research and treatments, to bring us hope that progress is being made throughout the world.

Community Education ($5000): The additional funding from the campaign will allow us to offer community education, outside of our campus, to help demystify and normalize behaviors associated with dementia-related diseases.

Inspirational Programming ($60,000)
A diagnosis of dementia is devastating for the entire family. We understand it is the present in which one must live…to seek and celebrate the joy and connection that happen in a moment. The premier programs that we will establish will bring fulfilling opportunities to spark that engagement in the moment within each resident. This will be accomplished through:

Expressive arts and wellness programs ($10,000): To encourage our residents to connect and communicate throughout their journey. While our program will include staff-driven activities, the campaign funding will allow us to bring professional therapists to our campus.

Spiritual and faith-based programs ($10,000): To nourish the souls of our residents through this stage of their life. The funding from the campaign will allow us to supplement our own chaplain-led offerings with guest pastors and spiritual leaders in the community.

Intellectually stimulating programs ($20,000): Offered by staff to fulfill the need for human curiosity, while celebrating skills and capabilities residents spent their lifetime developing. The additional funding will make it possible to expand these programs to deliver individually-designed and executed plans for each resident.

Social opportunities ($20,000): Offered frequently by staff, these events will create community. The additional funding will allow us to bring all residents, families, and staff together for professionally-led musical concerts, receptions, and holiday events that are so important to stay connected and engaged with our loved ones.

Capital Resources ($1 million)
The education and programming described above requires additional capital resources to deliver the premier program level of which we are so capable. These items include, but are not limited to:

– Water features, interactive musical instruments, and shaded seating in the Courtyard Gardens.
– Brain games such as “It’s Never Too Late,” chapel equipment, and musical instruments in Family Rooms.
– Massage recliners and sound systems in the Reflection Rooms.
– Aquariums, tactile interactions, and sensory stations in the Sensory Circles.
– Art, musical, and fitness equipment in the Life Enrichment Centers.
– And so much more.

When philanthropy — your philanthropy — is combined with the vision of others, an opportunity emerges to establish Plymouth Harbor as the premier leader in inspirational care and education for those challenged with dementia. This is important to our current and future memory care residents and their families. We hope it is important to all of you, too.

 

We have seen the structure of the Northwest Garden Building taking shape over the last few months. Now that we are familiar with the outside of the building, it is time to take a look on the inside. Join us to learn about the expanded assisted living and new memory care program, and how it will all come together. This three-part series will answer questions about the floor plan, amenities, dining options, training, programming, and much, much more!

Part Two: A Positive Approach™ to Care with Brandi Burgess, Social Worker
Held on Friday, February 17th at 3:00 p.m. in Pilgrim Hall

Alzheimer’s Disease is a growing concern for all Americans. At Plymouth Harbor, we have adopted the Positive Approach™ to Care (PAC) by Teepa Snow. Join us for this encore of the PAC presentation held on January 20th, which will go into much more depth regarding the program, depicting examples of everyday life for residents who will reside in our new Memory Care Residence.