On Friday, December 16th, Plymouth Harbor held a surprise celebration for the retirement of our longest-serving employee, housekeeper Lanette Davis. She spent her last day at Plymouth Harbor on December 30, 2016, after more than 42 years of service.

In December 1973, at 22 years old, Lanette filled out an application for a housekeeping position at the suggestion of a friend. One interview was all it took and she was on the floor the next day. Lanette credits her length of service to an outstanding work environment and exceptional leadership. Most of all, however, she credits the sense of family she feels with both her co-workers and the residents she has cared for over the years.

Residents and employees alike gathered on the Mezzanine to celebrate Lanette, honoring her decades of service with laughs, cake, memory books filled with photos, a special plaque recognizing her dedication to Plymouth Harbor, and, of course, her favorite flowers (yellow roses). Special guests in attendance included Lanette’s son and husband.

“In this type of environment, it’s not often that you see this kind of cross-culture with residents and staff,” resident Dr. Paul Groen remarked. Residents and coworkers went on to share stories of their years spent with Lanette, consistently noting her unwavering positive attitude, work ethic, and contagious smile. “In my 13 years, she’s never not had a smile on her face,” says resident Ish Pedersen with a smile. “She will be missed.”

We are pleased to bring two lifelong learning courses to Plymouth Harbor in 2015, led by instructors from the Lifelong Learning Academy in Sarasota.  These offerings are supported in part through gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation

EisenhowerSecret Illnesses of U.S. Presidents and their Effect on World History and Politics  

Thursdays 4:00-5:30 p.m. (3 sessions) January 29, February 5, 12 in the Club Room

Was the course of world history during the twentieth century altered as a result of the secret and unknown illnesses of U.S. presidents?  Until recently, presidential illnesses were often kept hidden from press and public. Most have since been revealed, but how at the time did they affect the sufferers’ interaction with world leaders and their management of crises? Did FDR’s hypertension influence the conduct of WWII and his critical negotiations with Stalin at Yalta? What about the impact on the Cold War of Eisenhower’s hypertension and heart attack and JFK’s back surgery and Addison’s disease? In this course, blending history and medicine, we’ll explore these and other intriguing questions.   Course Fee:  $15 per registrant

Course leader:  Allan B. Schwartz, M.D. 

Professor of medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, specializing in nephrology and hypertension. He has served as vice chair of the department as well as clinical service chief, academic service chief, recipient of many “outstanding clinician” and “outstanding teacher” awards.  He has conducted numerous regional and national CME seminars. His publications include two textbooks and many chapters, national and international meeting presentations, abstracts, and articles. He is a peer reviewer for numerous medical journals. Dr. Schwartz received his M.D. degree from Hahneman Medical College (later Drexel University College of Medicine).

 

history medicineThe Epic of Medicine

Thursdays 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. (6 sessions) March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 9, 16 in the Club Room

This course traces the history of medicine as it relates to the history of mankind from pre-historic time to the 20th century. The emphasis will be on Western medicine, but influences from Eastern traditions will be included. A fervent attempt will be made to learn from history so we will not be destined to repeat it. Parallels will be drawn throughout the course to “modern medicine” as well as “alternative medicine.” Come to learn about the origins of “scientific” medicine, folk remedies, the role of religion in medicine, and so much more. This will be a PowerPoint presentation augmented by videotapes from the Teaching Company.  Course Fee:  $30 per registrant

Course leader:  Al Tripodi, M.D.

Dr. Tripodi has a B.A. from Cornell and an M.D. from SUNY Upstate Medical University, where he was an associate clinical professor of medicine. He is certified in internal medicine and geriatrics and practiced in Syracuse, N.Y. and Sarasota for forty years.  He has been responsible for teaching medical students and residents and was medical director of two extended-care facilities in Syracuse. He presently volunteers and is medical director of the Senior Friendship Center’s medical clinic in Sarasota. He has an abiding interest in history and a fervent belief that “to know history may prevent us from repeating it.”

Finlay_5x7 300 dpiThe Board of Trustees of Plymouth Harbor, Inc. welcomed three new members and elected new leadership for 2015.

The newly elected Chair of the Board of Trustees is G. Duncan Finlay, MD who is also currently serving as President and CEO of the Florence A. Rothman Institute and Chief Medical Officer of Alive Sciences, LLC.  During his previous tenure as Chief Medical Officer and President and CEO of Sarasota Memorial Hospital, the system was named one of America’s Best Hospitals by US News and World Report in seven medical specialties.

Harry Hobson, CEO of Plymouth Harbor said, “Dr. Finlay has served as a Trustee for the past three years.  He brings leadership, experience, vision, and a passion that is consistent with Plymouth Harbor’s mission.”

After four years as Chairperson during which he guided Plymouth Harbor through a significant growth initiative that culminated in the grand opening of new Wellness Center, F. Thomas Hopkins will now serve as Immediate Past Chair.

“Tom has always been present for important governance discussions and decision,” says Hobson, “I can’t imagine a more dedicated person than Tom Hopkins.  While we will miss him as Chair, we will cherish this coming year knowing he is in the Board Room with us.”

Sarah Pappas-portrait_4x5Three current Trustees have also been elected to serve as officers of the Board. Sarah H. Pappas, EdD, has been elected to the position of Vice Chair. Dr. Pappas is President of the William G.  and Marie Selby Foundation and former President of Manatee Community College (now State College of Florida).

Cindy Malkin, recently Board Chair at the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation, also a member of the Women’s Resource Board, will serve as Secretary.

Brian D. Hall, Executive Vice President and Director of Wealth Management at the Gateway Bank of Southwest Florida, will serve as Treasurer.

Cindy-Malkin

Brian-D--Hall

In addition to the officers, Plymouth Harbor is pleased to welcome three new trustees to the board:

CranorJohn M. Cranor, III, former President and CEO for the New College Foundation, has over 30 years of management experience in the food service and retail industries including senior executive positions with Pepsi-Cola North America, Taco Bell Corporation, Wilson Sporting Goods, and Frito-Lay Company. He currently serves as the non-executive Chair of the Board of Directors of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc.

PattersonNora Patterson, a Sarasota County Commissioner, was first elected to the Sarasota City Commission in 1991, and served until 1998 when she was elected to the Sarasota County Commission.  Prior to this she served as the Mayor of Sarasota from 1994-95 and was appointed by the Governor to serve two years on Florida’s Legislative Committee on Intergovernmental Relations from 1996-98.

Woeltjen lo resWilliam Woeltjen has served as the Chief Financial Officer of Sarasota Memorial Health Care System since 2010, where he is responsible for all financial matters related to the health care system, including financial reporting, financial planning, revenue cycle, reimbursement, debt management, and managed care contracting. He has more than 25 years of experience in corporate health care finance.

fall cleaningEverybody knows about spring cleaning.  Fall, however, may be a better time for cleaning since for many of us the year starts after summer and the hurricane season leaves us.

Of course, for Plymouth Harbor residents who hail from the more northern parts of our country, Fall cleaning conjures images of colored leaves collecting on the lawn and in the gutters. Yard work, lots of it, came on the heals of the bright fall colors. However, retirement years, particularly those in Sarasota, Florida don’t include much time with a rake in your hands. And at Plymouth Harbor, yard work is entirely a thing of the past, unless you enjoy tending your own garden.

Instead, Fall has other chores that seem to make sense.  Fall is good for throwing stuff out, all that stuff you have been collecting ever since you moved in.  There are some easy ways to get rid of your discards.

Think about your file cabinet.  How many outdated records do you have?  Those pounds of paper and their folders can go straight to the Recycling Bin.  If some are too private, there is the shredder in our Business Office near the mailboxes.

Old, dead batteries sitting around?  If they are marked with a letter (AA, AAA, C, D, etc.) they go straight to the trash and down the chute.  Batteries without a letter marking and all hearing aid batteries get special handling. They go to Audrey in the Maintenance Office on the ground floor.  Your housekeeper will take them there, if you ask her.

And your unused medicines, prescription or otherwise.  They are rather dangerous to keep around, some of them.  We all know they should not go into the toilet.  The A#1 place for them?  Take them to those great nurses in the Callahan Center.  They are disposing of their unused meds.  They will dump yours in with theirs.

And that chic skirt that makes you look fat?  The appliance that works but you do not need two?  To our handy dandy Fund Shop!  You know where it is — across from the Security Office in the East Garden Garage.

Whatever is not saleable here (would you buy it?) — off to Goodwill!!

Does it not make your life easier to be rid of that stuff?  The only question is “Can you resist the urge to fill up those shelves all over again?”

landfill We dump all that stuff down the chute or into the recycling bins and never give it another thought.  But we should.

After our recent resident  trip to the county landfill in Nokomis, we are a good bit smarter.  All that STUFF does not go up in smoke, literally or figuratively.  There is no burning to pollute our pure Florida air.  And, most assuredly, that debris does not just go away.  It requires an enormous number of employees, many of them operating challenging equipment, to get rid of our discards.

There is an area for construction waste.  By law, we are required to separate out the REusable lumber, pipe, metals and such from the UNusable.  When you see the piles of waste that arrive daily, you can see why many workers are required for this.

Someone has to oversee the Hazardous Waste disposal area.  There is usually a charge for getting rid of toxic materials.  It should be paid by you, if you deliver them yourself.  You will probably pay that charge to anyone else who takes those old electronics, liquid paint, and chemicals to the landfill for you.

Then there are the employees who separate all those plastics we dump, a separate pile for each type of plastic.  And tires.  There are a few uses being developed for ground-up tires and a few for the whole tire but, for the most part, these are a landfill problem.

A trip to the Nokomis landfill can clear up many of the mysteries about why we do what we do.