Did you know that most people are two different ages?  How can this be?  A person’s chronological age is often different than their biological age; but what  is the difference?

Chronological age is determined by the number of years that a person has existed.  Biological age is determined by the physiology of a person, which includes aspects such as physical structure of his or her body, sensory awareness, performance of motor skills, cognitive abilities, general mobility and functionality.

Chronological age has little to do with fitness capability.  When considering the intensity level at which you should exercise, or deciding whether or not you should even exercise at all, take into account your biological age instead of your chronological age. Analyze how you feel while performing daily activities instead of saying, “I’m 82,  I’m too old to exercise.” Think positively and ask yourself, “Do I really feel my age?”

An example of someone being two different ages is when an individual says, “I feel 10 years younger than I am.”  According to Cody Sipe, Ph.D. and director of clinical research in the physical therapy program at Harding University, “Most adults view themselves as being 10 or more years younger than their chronological age, but they also realize that they are not as young as they once were and need to train differently than younger individuals.”

Be careful not to dismiss physical activity out of your day because of your chronological age.  But when deciding on intensity level, be careful not to ignore signs that your body is conveying to you.

Try this out!  Avoid making decisions based on chronological age alone and instead base your decision on your biological age by listening to your body and analyzing your daily capabilities.  You might surprise yourself—or even better—impress yourself!

And just for fun!


References:  Vogel, A. (2013).  Older-Adult Fitness: Gauging the Limits of Your Fit Clients.  IDEA Fitness Journal, 10(2), 28-31.