By: Becky Pazkowski

A Commitment to Memory campaign is in full swing, with current gifts exceeding $2,345,000! The Campaign Committee is reaching out to neighbors and friends to ask for participation in the campaign. Our goal is to reach the $3 million by November 1st, when we cut the ribbon for the Grand Opening.

The campaign support will give us the opportunity to build a premier program in Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming, unlike no other in our region. Specifically, $2 million will go into an income-generating Designated Investment Fund, from which we will draw off 5 percent (or $100,000) annually to specifically support the Educational Leadership ($40,000) and Inspirational Programming ($60,000). The balance of $1 million will support the capital resources needed to deliver these programs.

We hope you will all be interested in learning more about how you could be part of this campaign. We are able to take pledges payable over a five-year period and there are naming opportunities for you to consider, should that be of interest. If you have questions or would like to know more, please contact one of the Campaign Committee members or me (Becky Pazkowski) at Ext. 398.

Campaign Committee: Honorary Chairs: Gerry and (the late) Walt Mattson; Campaign Co-Chairs: Barry and Phil Starr; Committee Members: Marie and Tom Belcher, Joan Sheil and Bruce Crawford, Jack Denison, Charles Gehrie, Jean Glasser, Harry Hobson, Jeanne Manser, Ann and Ray Neff, Cade Sibley, Nancy Lyon and Tom Towler; Staff: Joe Devore, Becky Pazkowski.

 

By: Chris Cooper, Wellness Director

We have all heard the benefits of exercise either from our doctors or in literature. Usually it is in reference to aerobic exercise, such as walking or biking, because of its cardiovascular-enhancing benefit as well as its ability to decrease risk for disease and increase weight loss. It is the go-to prescription for health enhancement at any age.

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society concluded that weekly resistance training sessions not only resulted in strength gains but also significant improvements in cognitive function in older adults who presented with mild cognitive impairment. 1

Simply put, resistance-training exercises are proving to be a powerful tool for enhancing brain function as well as resulting in stronger bones and muscles.

This is not the first study to show the cognitive benefits of exercise. However, this particular study differs in that the researchers set out to determine if the cognitive improvements were a result of enhanced cardiovascular capacity or enhanced muscular strength. Participants performed 2-3 strength training sessions per week along with aerobic exercise and were regularly tested on cognitive ability. At the end of the study, only the persons with enhanced strength gains were associated with improvements in cognition. This illustrates that maintaining/improving muscle strength contributes to brain health as well.

If you are interested in reading this complete study and learning the mechanisms for these gains, please see the reference below:

1) Mavros Y, Gates N, Wilson GC, et al. Mediation of Cognitive Function Improvements by Strength Gains After Resistance Training in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Outcomes of the Study of Mental and Resistance Training. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2016.

 

By: Sallie VanArsdale

Prominent among the common interests of new residents Laurie and Tom Goddard is the desire to live next to water. Possibly, this began in their childhoods. Laurie grew up in Weymouth, Massachusetts, near Massachusetts Bay. Tom did the same in Brooklyn, New York, where the southern shore edges the Atlantic.

After graduating from Weymouth High School, Laurie worked at the General Dynamics Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts. Tom graduated from “Poly Prep” in Brooklyn and went on to MIT. After graduating with B.S. and M.S. degrees, MIT’s ROTC took him to the U.S. Navy, assigned to the Quincy General Dynamics Shipyard, where, of course, he met Laurie. Within a few months they married. After they left the shipyard, Laurie worked for Mobil Oil and Tom went to Exxon in New York City. Wherever they lived there was water; Brooklyn, briefly, Darien, Connecticut, and Madison, New Jersey, for longer periods.

In Darien, they joined the Roton Point Sailing Association (RPSA) and raced a tornado class catamaran. They supported the RPSA on land, too — Laurie as Treasurer, Tom as Commodore. Summers found them vacationing at Hyannis at a Goddard family home.

Tom spent twenty-nine years at Exxon International. One early project, research on building large oil tankers, sent him to Scandinavia where the best facilities are located. “Some of the research models we used were pretty large themselves, forty feet long,” he commented. In 1973, Tom and a Dutch engineer, Wilhem Van Berlekom, won the Kinnard Prize of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers.

Laurie took advantage of Tom’s travel to visit the site and meet the researchers. She worked for Mobil for 21 years, including 10 of those as Assistant to the President. When Mobil moved to Virginia, she signed on with Exxon. “Commuting together was much pleasanter,” she observed smiling.

After retirement, the Goddards spent 20 summers on Cape Cod and winters in Stuart, Florida. They joined the U.S. Sailing Center in Martin County. The Center must have been delighted when two seasoned sailors volunteered for their race committee.

How did they find Plymouth Harbor? The Goddards searched Stuart and Delray Beach for Continuing Care Retirement Communities, then came to Sarasota. They drove by Plymouth Harbor and noted the waterside campus. After investigating, “We knew this was the place for us!” Laurie said.

So, two more water lovers are settling in here and appear happy with their decision.

 

Each year on Earth Day, various events are held across the globe to demonstrate support for environmental protection. At Plymouth Harbor, Earth Day, held last month on April 21st, is a campus-wide celebration of conservation efforts and a reminder to strive to do more each year.

Hosted by the Conservation Committee, the event continues to grow in size and creativity each year, offering vendor stations, giveaways, trivia, informational videos, prizes, and this year, a local produce vendor, Central Market, and a special interactive art installation. As with years past, the Conservation Committee also provided information on Plymouth Harbor’s recycling, water, and electricity conservation efforts.

The art installation (pictured above, right) used materials collected from the Resident Fund Shop and depicted a “love scene gone wrong.” Residents and visitors had the opportunity to vote on what happened, coming up with fun and far-reaching explanations.

Other noteworthy additions this year include a local produce vendor, the offering of Publix reusable shopping bags, and a fashion show and exhibit by the Fund Shop. Additionally, there was increased involvement from resident artists, displaying environmentally-friendly works of art across the room, with a special display from Smith Care Center residents. Visitors had the opportunity to vote on their favorite work of art, with the interactive art installation receiving the No. 1 spot. Winners of the trivia challenge included Susan Mauntel in first place and Alida de Jongh as runner-up. We look forward to next year’s event!
 
 

As residents of Sarasota since 1997, Drs. Sarah and George Pappas have a strong tie to Plymouth Harbor. Sarah first became aware of Plymouth Harbor 30 years ago through Peggy Bates, a very prominent person at New College of Florida and in the Sarasota community. In 2012, Sarah joined the Plymouth Harbor, Inc. Board of Trustees. She ended her term in January 2017, and served as Vice Chair for two years.

In November 2017, when the highly-anticipated Northwest Garden opens, Sarah and George will join us on the Plymouth Harbor campus as residents of the new building. In the meantime, the two are busy “rightsizing,” selling their home, and preparing for the move into their new apartment — in addition to balancing their work life.

Sarah is the current President of the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation, and the past president of Manatee Community College (now State College of Florida). While Sarah plans to step down from her position at the Selby Foundation this coming June, she is sure to remain busy with her positions on the Board of the Sarasota Tiger Bay Club and her recent appointment to the Ringling Museum Board of Trustees.

George is a talented abstract artist whose work can be found at the Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art Gallery, and additional galleries in Tampa and New Smyrna Beach. In fact, in 2011, the Ringling Museum acquired one of his works, “Double Trouble,” for its permanent collection. In addition, up until last year, George served on the Board of Trustees at the Hermitage Artist Retreat.

Both Sarah and George spent much of their lives working in higher education. Sarah received her master’s degree in social science education from the University of South Florida and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Nova Southeastern University. Her career spans 40 years at three community colleges and the University of Central Florida. George studied at the Massachusetts College of Art, then continued his arts-related education with a master’s from Harvard and Ph.D. from Penn State University. After teaching at Northern Iowa University and Penn State, he taught art education for 27 years at the University of South Florida, serving 10 years as chair of the art department.

When asked why they chose Plymouth Harbor as their new home, Sarah responded, “The fact that Plymouth Harbor was a non-profit was number one for us. The practice of having residents on the Board was another attraction. Since both George and I spent our whole lives in higher education, it reminded us of the shared governance that is seen in universities and colleges. It really impressed us.”

What are they most looking forward to in living in the Northwest Garden and at Plymouth Harbor? The couple highlighted their brand-new apartment, and its 10-foot ceilings and plentiful wall space to display George’s artwork, as well as the Bistro just down the hall for entertaining friends. Additionally, George plans to use their second bedroom as his art studio overlooking their waterfront view, and together, they plan to take advantage of the many lectures, seminars, and activities that take place on campus.

As November quickly approaches, we certainly look forward to welcoming Sarah and George.
 
 

True of most scientists, Charles Miller knew what he wanted to do from a young age. “It goes back to when I was a boy, wiring light bulbs with my father and putting extension cords in the house,” he remembers. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Charles didn’t experience the glamour most associate with the city. “It’s like any other city – it has the persona of Hollywood over it, but underneath there’s a city of ordinary people doing ordinary things.”

Far from ordinary, Charles went on to earn both his B.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. In his senior year of college in 1952, Charles met his first wife. “I met her as I met both of my wives – on the telephone,” he laughs. His friend was on the phone with a girl, Anne-Marie, and handed it to Charles. They ended up hitting it off, Charles invited her to a party, and the rest was history when they married a year and a half later.

In his last semester of graduate school, Charles’ professor asked if he would be interested in a one-year teaching position at Amherst College. Charles accepted, and when his term came to a close, he ended up enjoying the experience so much that he looked for a similar opportunity nearby. He landed at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where he stayed for the next 35 years. His wife, who was also a teacher, taught education at Central Connecticut State University. Charles and his wife had two daughters — and it comes as no surprise that their daughters are both teachers today.

In contrast, Cynthia Lichtenstein was born and raised on the East Coast in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. She studied at Radcliffe College of Harvard University in Massachusetts and graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Russian History and Literature. “With my degree, my choices were to get a Ph.D. and teach, or to work for the government.”

During her final semester of college in 1955, Cynthia decided to take the exam to work for the U.S. State Department. She did well enough that she was given an oral exam, but that was as far as she would get. “One of the examiners was kind enough to say, ‘Don’t feel badly when you do not pass this. We do not take women,’” she remembers. Despite the setback, Cynthia was not discouraged. She had a friend who was studying at Harvard Law School, and when she began arguing a case with him, he suggested that she go to law school. Without too much consideration, she took the LSAT, scored in the top percentile, and applied.

Cynthia’s parents, however, did not want her to attend law school. Instead, they gave her a trip to Paris for graduation, and when she returned, the only job she could find was as a secretary. “I was dreadful at it,” she laughs. “I couldn’t do two things at once. But at the time, it wasn’t usual for young women to go to law school.” After she was let go from her job as a secretary, Cynthia followed her instincts, borrowed the money from an uncle, and attended Yale Law School.
 
Cynthia met her first husband when in Paris, and after graduation from Yale, went to work as an associate at a Wall Street firm. She worked full-time for two years before they began their family. While pregnant with her first child, Cynthia began a two-year program through the Ford Foundation, which was offering scholarships to study civil law for one year at the University of Chicago and a second year internship abroad. After Chicago, Cynthia’s husband got a job at the Economist in London, while she began her internship at the European Economic Community (EEC) in Brussels, where she worked on EEC African projects.

In 1963, Cynthia returned part-time to her firm in New York. But in 1971, she decided to explore a different career path. By this time, she was raising three children, her husband was in Boston working at MIT, and because she couldn’t commit to working full-time, her firm would not make her a partner. A friend recommended her for a teaching position at Boston College Law School, and she accepted — as their second female professor.

While Cynthia had a newfound love for teaching, she had her work cut out for her with 140 students in one class and 90 in another. Balancing work and home life, she taught corporate finance (including securities law) and contracts. She was also the second in the country to teach a course in international economic law at a law school. After five years in Boston, Cynthia and her husband divorced.

In 1984, Cynthia met Charles — who had been widowed two years before — over the phone. A mutual friend set them up, and Cynthia invited Charles to Boston for dinner. When he showed up with a loaf of bread and a bottle of wine, Cynthia fell in love. A year and a half later they were married.

After several years of a commuter marriage, Cynthia convinced Charles to take early retirement. He taught half the year for five years and then made the move. Cynthia retired from Boston College in 2001, but worked as a visiting professor at George Washington University Law School for four falls after that. The couple spent winters on their boat in Fort Myers, before coming to Sarasota and looking into Plymouth Harbor at the suggestion of friends.

Today, Charles and Cynthia spend half their time here and the other half at their home in Stonington, Connecticut. In his spare time, Charles reads with the Shakespeare Group and enjoys the Physics Club he co-founded nearly 10 years ago. Cynthia keeps busy with several law organizations. She is a panelist for NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) Chapter 19, and is occasionally appointed to hear cases. Up until the last year, she was a Vice Chair of the Executive Council of the International Law Association, which meets every six months in London.

Additionally, Cynthia worked with the International Law Students Association, which puts on the annual Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Today, she serves as a coach for Booker High School’s mock trial and appellate cases. This program works with students interested in law and allows them to compete in Florida-wide mock trials and appeals that go all the way up to Florida’s mock Supreme Court.

With a passion for life and a continued commitment to their work, there is surely more to come from Charles Miller and Cynthia Lichtenstein.

We have seen the structure of the Northwest Garden Building taking shape over the last few months. Now that we are familiar with the outside of the building, it is time to take a look on the inside. The following presentation, adapted for our Harbor Club members, discusses the building’s expanded assisted living, new memory care program, and how it will all come together. This video series will answer questions about the floor plan, amenities, dining options, training, programming, and much, much more!

A Look Inside with Harry Hobson, President & CEO, Brandi Burgess, Social Worker, and Becky Pazkowski, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy
Held on Thursday, April 27th at 3:30 p.m. in Pilgrim Hall

 

 

An only child born in Boston during the Great Depression, Reina Troiano lived a life of self-exploration. After high school, Reina says she “lived life backwards.” She went directly into the working world, holding many different positions, from a file clerk to advertising to working for a personnel agency and even modeling. It wasn’t until she was in her 40s that Reina decided to go back to college, double-majoring in English and interdisciplinary social studies. Reina later went on to study for a master’s degree, leaving before graduation, and eventually landing a job in the U.S. Senate. What did she learn along the way?

View her April 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

Former President and CEO for the New College Foundation, John Cranor, III has over 30 years of management experience in the food service and retail industries, including senior executive positions with Pepsi-Cola North America, Taco Bell Corporation, Wilson Sporting Goods, and Frito-Lay Company.

John holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from New College of Florida and a Master of Business Administration from Harvard University Graduate School of Business. He also received an honorary Doctorate from Bellarmine University. John currently serves as the non-executive Chair of the Board of Directors of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc. In addition to serving on the Plymouth Harbor, Inc. Board of Trustees, John now joins the Plymouth Harbor Foundation Board of Trustees.

 
 
 
 
 

In March 2017, Plymouth Harbor published the Northwest Garden Building, a special edition of the Harbor Light resident newsletter. This publication is intended to provide the most up-to-date information regarding the Northwest Garden Building. Please note that the images used in this publication are only renderings, not exact depictions of what each space will look like in terms of décor, design, etc.

To view the electronic version of this publication, click here.