Nancy and Jerry Kaplan married after college. Nancy, while raising three children, worked as a professional artist, and at age 50, trained and then worked as a Registered Nurse. As a teenager, Jerry contracted Polio. Despite the lifelong effects, he started and operated a business for 15 years before working for 30 years as an elementary school teacher and principal. What led these two down their respective career paths?

 

View their August Insights presentation to find out:

Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoardInsights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to Phil Starr, each Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.

 

Congratulations 2016 Scholarship Recipients! We are very pleased to present the following individuals who have been awarded scholarships from the Plymouth Harbor Foundation this year.

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Carol Bello — Daughter of Martha Chavez, Housekeeping Staff, 
Foundation Scholarship ($2,000)

Carol is in her final year at Florida State University, pursuing a degree in social work and political science. She hopes to go on to law school after earning her bachelor’s degree. One day, she wants to make a difference in the government and assist in creating better laws and regulations to help immigrants.


Picture2Dallas Conklin — Dining Staff, Foundation Scholarship ($1,500)

Dallas has been accepted into the Art of Sound Recording Course of the Audio Engineer Training Program at Clear Track Studios in Clearwater. Dallas has been a musician and writer of music since grade school and wishes now to pursue the technical and production aspects of recording. He hopes someday to have a career in music production/engineering.

 


Picture3Dayle Cortes — Son of Hernando Cortes, SCC Nursing Staff, 
Foundation Scholarship ($2,000)

Dayle has been accepted into the University of Florida Innovation Academy to pursue an accounting degree. He hopes to become a CPA in the next five years. He is excited to be attending the Innovation Academy, as he will be able to explore entrepreneurship while working on an accounting major and an innovation minor.

 


Picture4Desiree Whatley — Home Care Staff, Foundation Scholarship ($2,000)

Desiree is a student at Manatee Technical College, studying to be a Surgical Technical Assistant. She recently earned her Associates in Arts degree at State College of Florida and hopes to eventually earn a Bachelor’s in Health Science. The Surgical Technical Assistant program certification at Manatee Technical College will get her one step closer to her goal.

 


Picture5Vernicia (Nici) Crenshaw — Dining Staff and Daughter of Michelle 
Brinson, Housekeeping Staff, Bea Davis Scholarship ($1,500)

Nici is a student at Meridian College, studying obstetric sonography. She is intrigued by the 3D and 4D ultrasounds, and has a passion for being part of the process as parents first “meet” their babies, seeing their faces through the advanced technology. Nici said she knew when she was in high school that this was the career for her.

 

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Hannah Matosky — Daughter of Steve Matosky, Security Staff, 
Foundation Scholarship ($2,000)

Hannah is a senior at University of Central Florida, earning her bachelor’s degree in human communications. She hopes to work in brand development after graduation and has several internships lined up along the way. Her passion is to help companies be the best they can be by helping them tell their story.

 


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Kaylee Hood — Dining Staff, Evelin Corsey Scholarship ($1,500)

Kaylee is a student at University of South Florida, majoring in health sciences and healthcare administration, and would eventually like to earn her master’s degree. She hopes to become a speech pathologist so that she can help children with speech disorders adjust to the society around them.  

 


Picture8Lucas Smith — Son of Edna Pineda, Housekeeping Staff, Jeannette 
Gehrie Music Scholarship ($1,500)

Lucas is our youngest scholarship recipient, having turned six this year. His mother shares that he has shown an inclination in music for several years and during testing was shown to have an ear and talent for it. He will be taking drum and keyboard lessons for the next six months.

 

 

VPicture9alerie Bixler — Daughter of Shelley Bixler, SCC Nursing Staff, Jane T. Smiley Scholarship ($2,000)

Valerie aspires to become a dental hygienist, as she would like to help educate patients on the importance of dental health and prevention. She is currently at State College of Florida pursuing her associates’ degree and will then continue on to the dental hygiene program.

 

 


Picture10Venise Andre — Dining Staff, Foundation Scholarship ($2,000)

Venise Andre is attending Valencia Community College to pursue a degree in business management. Venise is the youngest of five siblings, the first to finish high school, and the only one to go on to college. She lost her mother when she was 10 and hopes that by furthering her education, she will be fulfilling a dream her mother had for her.

 

IMG_3797Greg and Don Fosselman have an inseparable bond. Numbers five and six, respectively, of seven children, the two live next door to each other here at Plymouth Harbor. Of their seven siblings, they had only one sister — the oldest. While Greg and Don seem to be the closest of their siblings, they led two very different lives after leaving their hometown of Waterloo, Iowa, years ago.

After finishing high school, Greg attended the University of Iowa. As he always had a keen interest in newsprint growing up, it came as no surprise that he decided to study journalism. After graduation, however, he joined the U.S. Army and was stationed in Germany from 1950 IMG_3802until 1952. While there, he handled logistics for field engineer units in Frankfurt, and later held an administrative position in Kaiserslautern. Soon after he returned to the United States, Greg was offered a position at United Press International (UPI), a leading newswire service. Greg was at UPI for over 15 years, serving as a newspaper and broadcast editor in Milwaukee and Madison, Wisconsin, and eventually Chicago. In 1968, he was offered a job at the Chicago Tribune as a headline writer and news editor, where he remained until he retired in 1989.

Don also joined the U.S. Army after he graduated from Iowa State Teachers College (now University of Northern Iowa). Like his older brother, he was stationed in Germany from 1953 until 1955. After Don returned to the United States, he accepted a teaching position in Montour, Iowa, for two years before he went on to attend Teacher’s College at Columbia University to earn his master’s degree. “I went to New York and never moved back,” Don says. He held teaching positions for several years in New York and Connecticut before he transitioned into a guidance counselor position, retiring in 1992. “I enjoyed my years as an educator,” he says. “But, as a guidance counselor, I felt that my day-to-day interactions were much more varied and meaningful.”

While Greg and Don lived states away from each other, their lives often overlapped. The two kept in touch as most siblings do and visited each other frequently. On occasion, even their professional lives overlapped, which is exemplified by the summer of 1958 when Don was working for a charity in New York City. The organization operated a barge called “The Floating Hospital,” which cruised around the New York Harbor, providing healthcare facilities and summer activities for underprivileged families.

The charity was in need of some publicity, so Don reached out to Greg, who was still at UPI at the time. Greg set to work on the story, sent it out over the wire, and it was picked up in no time by several media outlets in New York City. It received so much traction that the local outlets sent their reporters out to cover the story in person. Needless to say, the organization was quite impressed with Don Fosselman.

Don was the first to move to Sarasota. After retiring in Westchester County in New York, he spent his winters traveling to many different areas in Florida. A neighbor in New York owned a home on Longboat Key and ended up sharing the Longboat Observer with him. He answered an advertisement for a two-month Lido Key rental and the rest was history when he moved here in 2000. In 2011, he moved into Plymouth Harbor.

In contrast, Greg spent his winters on the West Coast, namely in California and Arizona, but a visit to Don convinced him to move to Plymouth Harbor in 2013. Today, the two are located on the fourteenth floor, with only a short walk down the hallway between them.

At Plymouth Harbor, the brothers enjoy dining together and exercising in the Wellness Center. Greg attends the Sit Fit class every Monday and Wednesday, while Don participates in Tap class on Wednesdays. Outside of Plymouth Harbor, Don spends his time volunteering as an usher at various venues around Sarasota. The Van Wezel, Sarasota Opera House, Historic Asolo Theater, Asolo Repertory Theatre, and the Players Theater are among the many places you might find him.

In addition to his appreciation for theater, Don has a passion for traveling. “I’ve been to almost every place I ever dreamed of going. I’ve never left Earth though,” he jokes. “Maybe if I were younger.” This year, Don went on a tour of the American National Parks, and in a few short weeks he’ll be on a Danube River Cruise through Europe. When Greg was asked about traveling, he laughed and said, “I’ve never been much of a traveler — I let Don do it for me.”

While the Fosselman brothers certainly have a  mix of fascinating interests, you’ll be sure to find these two enjoying dinner together almost every night in the Plymouth Harbor restaurant.

 

Resident Vera Kohn passed away in March of this year. During her lifetime, Vera made annual gifts to the Employee Assistance Fund to benefit Employee Hardship cases. In July, we were fortunate to receive a gift of $10,000 from the Vera Kohn Trust to benefit employee hardship. The trust officer said in his letter to us: “Vera held you in high esteem and she wished to express her appreciation and admiration.” We are very honored and appreciative of Vera’s kind feelings for our hardworking and deserving employees. We welcome Vera as a new member of the MacNeil Society.

 

In 1999, Anne and Albert Moore established a Charitable Remainder Unitrust (CRUT) with their financial managers, naming Plymouth Harbor as one of the recipients of the remainder. Albert passed away in January 2015, and a little over a year later, in February 2016, Anne passed. In June, we received the unrestricted distribution from their CRUT in the amount of $29,000. Anne shared this information with us years before she passed away, so we were able to recognize the Moores in the MacNeil Society over the years and celebrate their estate gift while they were alive. We are very grateful for their forward thinking in establishing this gift.

A Charitable Remainder Unitrust is a gift vehicle that has several advantages to the donor:

1) Generates income to the donor for life;

2) Offers a tax deduction at the time the gift is made;

3) Rate of income is a fixed percent for life;

4) Donor may use cash or appreciated securities to fund;

5) Donor may name more than one charitable beneficiary. With a CRUT, the donor continues to receive a fixed percentage of income over their life, and whatever remains in the trust at the end of life is what is distributed to the charitable beneficiaries.

 

By: Celia Catlett

phillipsMarjorie and Bernard “Bernie” are a dynamic couple, and they parlayed their energy and intelligence into useful and interesting careers. Both born in New York City, they met at Cornell University when she was an undergraduate and he was working toward his doctorate in sociology.

Marjorie went on to get her master’s in education from Boston University. Hired at Middlesex Community College, she initiated a course to teach parents how to choose a preschool. The class went from eight to 35 students and then developed into a two-year Early Childhood Teachers’ Training Program. She founded a second similar program at the Minuteman Vocational Technical School in Lexington, Massachusetts. When asked to teach a trilingual first grade (French, Spanish, and English) in Lowell, she discovered that most of the pupils were Cambodian! After that adventure, she enjoyed teaching science from kindergarten to fourth grade for a number of years.

During this time, she was also busy with two sons, David who is now a professor of humanities at Wake Forest, and Michael who works in Atlanta’s City Planning Department using computer applications for geographic information systems. Looking back on it, Marjorie says that she wonders how she managed it all.

Bernie also has brought a creative force to his work in academia. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Colombia University, crossed the country to get his master’s from Washington State University (where he enjoyed riding a motorcycle through the rolling hills of the area) and then it was back to the East Coast to pursue his Ph.D. in sociology from Cornell University. He has taught at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the University of Illinois (Champaign/Urbana), and, for the greater part of his career, at Boston University. He has written a number of books, from textbooks like Social Research: Strategies and Tactics to a book entitled Worlds of the Future, which combined fiction and nonfiction.

He founded and directed the Sociological Imagination Group in 2000 and has just finished collaborating with three co-authors on Invisible Crisis: Toward an Interdisciplinary Scientific Method, a book that they will use for a textbook for their Academy for Individual Evolution (www.individualevolution.org). Its focus is on how each individual can evolve. Interaction versus isolation is the key concept in their approach.

But life has not been all work for the Phillips. They enjoy classical music and jazz, art and travel, the latter two well combined in some Japanese art in their apartment. In the seventeen years they were on Longboat Key, they became involved in the local arts culture. They are readers and film lovers, and, by the way, Bernie would like to find a ping-pong partner. As I said, they are a dynamic duo.

 

Last month, we learned that Fran Knight had passed away. Fran lived at Plymouth Harbor for nearly 20 years before she moved in early 2015 to be closer to her daughters in Massachusetts.

During her years with us, she was involved in a variety of committees and activities at Plymouth Harbor. One such involvement was in art, as she was both an artist and a lover of art. We are honored to have recently received $5,000 from Fran’s trust, which her daughters wish to benefit the Plymouth Harbor Art Fund. The fund was established to support both resident artists and overall art at Plymouth Harbor. It is our pleasure to include Fran Knight as a member of the MacNeil Society.

 

By: Lee Yousri

GaylordWhen I invited Dee Gaylord to my apartment for her “bio” interview, she immediately said, “Why don’t you come to mine and you can see my artwork?” That was my first clue: I was dealing with a genuine, gracious person—dedicated to her home and her art. Welcome, Dee.

Life for Dee started in Peoria, Illinois. It really started when she attended Bradley College there and met her husband-to-be. Welcome, Jim. In the early years of their marriage, Dee taught first grade and Jim was a real estate developer. In 1969, they moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, where Jim had purchased a Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise. It was a magical progression after that as Jim developed a chain of restaurants in Iowa, Illinois, and Nebraska. Dee took advantage of their domicile, a university town, by continuing her education. She took classes in art, clinical psychology, and gerontology, and received a post-graduate degree.

But Dee’s first and all-consuming love was painting. She dedicated considerable time to it, participating in many shows. Photos of her paintings were included in books on watercolor. Their first exposure to this area was at a meeting held in Sarasota where Jim was appointed as the Upper Midwest Franchise President. They stayed at The Colony on Longboat Key, now defunct, but at that time reputedly the top tennis resort in the country—and as tennis buffs, they enjoyed it so much they actually purchased a condo on this very first visit. It was a “had to rent” deal that permitted them to spend only one month yearly there. They sold it a few years later and purchased a condo that allowed them to stay as long as they chose. For 25 years, they were snowbirds. Dee had the pleasure of owning a gallery in downtown Sarasota and she studied with many great artists who came here to conduct workshops.

Upon retirement in 1995, Jim served on many boards and enjoyed being a lecturer at the University of Nebraska’s business school. He lectured on entrepreneurship, and in 1997, was selected by the university as Entrepreneur of the Year. While all this was going on, they raised three children: Tim, John, and Missy. This of course progressed into grandchildren—four to be exact. In 2008, the Gaylords bought a home in Lakewood Ranch and subsequently became Florida residents.

Through friends they heard about Plymouth Harbor and they find it ideal. They love their beautiful Tower apartment where they are surrounded by Dee’s art, and at the same time, Jim deals with his health issues as a resident of the Smith Care Center.

 

WellnessAmiAmi French has been a Yoga instructor with Plymouth Harbor for over six years. She teaches the all-level Yoga class on Monday mornings at 11:00 a.m. in the Wellness Center. Ami is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, where she studied fine arts. Although she practiced Yoga throughout college, Ami first went on to a career in advertising and graphic design after graduating. After several years and a move from Massachusetts to Florida, Ami found her true passion teaching Yoga — which eventually prompted her to travel to Tamil Nadu, India, eight years ago, where she studied Hatha and Sivananda Yoga techniques.

Today, Ami primarily teaches Yoga to older adults. In addition to Plymouth Harbor, Ami instructs at other local organizations, including having taught individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease at Sarasota’s Jewish Family & Children’s Services. Her work with this population inspired her to go back to school six years ago, first to become a Certified Nursing Assistant, and later, a Registered Nurse (RN). In July 2016, Ami received her license as an RN from the Florida Board of Nursing. She plans to continue her work in the wellness industry, teaching Yoga and using her knowledge as a nurse to help others.

One thing Ami enjoys most about Yoga is taking ancient techniques and applying them to everyday issues. She discusses the physical benefits, including flexibility, balance, and posture correction, in addition to benefits that come from meditation and breathing exercises, including increased lung capacity and circulation as well as cellular repair and improved memory.

“Although Yoga stems from Hindu roots, the American version is a revision of wellness with a mix of its original spiritual elements,” Ami says. “My interest is in using traditional Yoga techniques to help people improve their lifestyle, and prevent and slow disease processes.”

Ami describes her class here at Plymouth Harbor as a hybrid class — one that is open to people of all levels, where you can participate while seated or using a floor mat. If you’re interested in learning more, stop by Ami’s class on Monday mornings.

 

mural1If you’ve stopped by the Smith Care Center’s (SCC) Therapy room recently, you might have noticed a change of scenery. In July, the SCC Therapy team welcomed a new mural on one of its walls, depicting a colorful and inviting beach scene.

The mural is the work of self-taught artist Carol Roman, who is also the mother of Tony Roman in our Dining Services department. Carol is a talented local artist, having produced artwork for Bradenton Healthcare and Peach’s Restaurants, in addition to specializing in artwork for individual homes, pool areas, furniture, and more.

The mural illustrates a beautiful shoreline with fencing along the beach, an anchored boat, islands off in the distance, and palm trees seemingly extending into the therapy room. While at first glance it may seem mural2like your typical beach scene, you may want to take a closer look. Each member of the SCC Therapy team has a personalized item incorporated into the mural. And if you are lucky, they just may give you a clue behind the meaning.

This mural is only the start for the SCC Therapy team. In the coming weeks, they hope to add inspirational quotes to the room’s remaining walls. With no
windows to the outside, the team felt this was the perfect way to incorporate the unique location and atmosphere of Plymouth Harbor. After stopping multiple visitors in their tracks and receiving several comments from residents, it seems they were right. If you are interested in viewing the new mural, simply stop by the SCC Therapy office and take a look.