Plymouth Harbor was built more than 50 years ago on Coon Key — home to both native plant and animal life. Over the years, we have added unique and beautiful plant species to help further enhance our environment.

As you walk the grounds, you may notice that our unique plant life is identified with signs displaying both the common and scientific name of the species. Our landscaping team, which consists of Marcos Franca and George Kingston, serve as experts on the plant species here at Plymouth Harbor, performing all groundskeeping duties.

What are some of the most interesting plant species found on campus? The landscaping team sums it up with the following items: the African Tulip tree, which does not normally grow in climates that are not consistently over 70 degrees and is native to the tropical dry forests of Africa; the Gumbo Limbo tree, which has unusual red bark that peels back, reminiscent of sunburned skin, giving it the nickname “tourist tree;” the Banyan tree, with roots and branches that reach the ground; the Floss Silk tree, which grows fast in spurts when water is abundant, and can reach more than 82 feet tall. Below is an aerial photo of the Plymouth Harbor grounds, with each of these species identified.

 

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