Since 1990, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has celebrated National Nurses Week from May 6th through May 12th, the birthday of Florence Nightingale – the founder of modern nursing. This annual event recognizes and celebrates the hard work and dedication exhibited each and every day by nurses across the country.

Additionally, National Nursing Home Week is celebrated annually, beginning May 14th and ending May 20th. Established by the American Health Care Association in 1967, and always beginning on Mother’s Day, National Nursing Home Week provides an opportunity for residents and their loved ones, staff, volunteers, and surrounding communities to recognize the role of skilled nursing care centers in caring for seniors. This year, Plymouth Harbor celebrated both annual events during the week of May 15th through May 19th.

Our campus-wide celebration honored our Home Care, Assisted Living, and Skilled Nursing staff, offering a small event each day, including: “Sundae” Monday, OJ and bagels on Tuesday, Staff Bingo on Wednesday, Taco and Potato Bar on Thursday, and the Blessing of the Hands on Friday.

Held in the Smith Care Center, the Blessing of the Hands offers a simple blessing to our caretakers through a cleansing with myrrh water. Aides, nurses, housekeepers, dining staff, residents, and administration alike are invited to attend, where we acknowledge the role each plays in caring for our residents. The following is said to each participant during the ceremony, “May the work of your hands bring comfort, dignity, and mercy to all the people your hands touch.”

We are truly thankful for the work of our healthcare team and for all those who care for our residents here at Plymouth Harbor.

Plymouth Harbor recently participated in the State of Talent Conference hosted by CareerSource Suncoast in partnership with the Patterson Foundation. This is the first year for the State of Talent Conference, which was held on Friday, May 19th, at the University of South Florida’s Sarasota-Manatee campus.

The conference was aimed at Human Resources and Operations Executives, and its purpose was to bring together employers from Sarasota and Manatee counties who wish to learn how better to recruit, train, and retain talent.

Plymouth Harbor was the sponsor for the Age-Friendly Workplace Panel discussion. Harry Hobson, our President/CEO, was joined on the panel by Kathy Black, Ph.D. (gerontologist and professor at USF), and Mike Jeffries (owner and operator of Mader Electric, Inc.). Laurey Strkyer of the Patterson Foundation moderated the discussion. The topics discussed included demographics of the current workforce, how companies like Plymouth Harbor and Mader Electric recruit and retain employees of all ages, and some of the highlights of each generation.

Harry Hobson kicked off the session by introducing Plymouth Harbor, as an employment leader in Sarasota for over 50 years. He cited the challenges we face in recruiting staff for the new Northwest Garden Building, especially our new level of care in the memory care residence, with the increasing demand in Sarasota for hospitality talent. He also stated the importance of Plymouth Harbor and other Life Plan Communities in Sarasota to make themselves known as an industry where individuals can build their careers in nearly every field, such as accounting, marketing, culinary, healthcare, trades, philanthropy, and hospitality.

“At a recent meeting of the Chamber of Commerce, it was surprising for us to learn that when naming industries that exist in our state, the Life Plan Community industry was not even recognized,” said Harry. “It was an eye-opener to us and we decided to take some action and get involved to introduce our industry to the budding and existing workforce.”

Other organizations participating in the sessions included Department of Economic Opportunity, Dr. Rick Goodman, the Herald-Tribune, Intern Bridge, Game On Nation, FCCI Insurance, PGT Industries, Design Concepts Marine Concepts, and Anna Maria Oyster Bar. The conference was sold out, with approximately 150 participants.

 

A. Rothman Institute, where he serves as President and CEO, and The Rothman Index. 

According to Dr. Finlay, healthcare in the United States is beset by upward spiraling and financially unsustainable costs and quality that is disappointing at best. He says, “These pressures have led to a broad conclusion by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the industry as a whole, that the system must change from the current fee-for-service payment model to a ‘value-based’ reimbursement model.”
 
Early efforts to address this issue have had inconsistent results in terms of both quality and cost measurements. Common to these approaches, and any others likely to be proposed, is that they are patient-centered and thus require a means to accurately measure and follow a patient’s overall condition at any level of care, from the acute care hospital through skilled nursing, home health care, and assisted and independent living organizations.
 
The Rothman Index
The Rothman Index is an acuity metric developed at Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The Index uses data empirically, associated with severity of illness, and automatically computed, using data routinely entered in the electronic medical record — including nursing assessments, Braden Scale score, cardiac rhythm, vital signs, blood oxygen level, and lab test results.
 
The Rothman Index has been validated with over 30 peer-reviewed articles and is used in over 60 hospitals nationwide, including Methodist Houston, the Yale New Haven Health System, and the University of Florida Hospitals. Preliminary studies in skilled nursing facilities appear to support its accuracy outside the hospital.

Plymouth Harbor’s Involvement
It has been speculated that a functionally equivalent index of acuity can be constructed for those persons living independently. Therefore, the Florence A. Rothman Institute is exploring a trial study whereby patients conduct their own medical self-assessments by answering a series of questions.

In April 2017, Dr. Finlay formally invited our independent living residents to participate in the study, working collaboratively with The Rothman Index and Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The study officially began on May 9, 2017, with 43 Plymouth Harbor participants.
 
About the Study
The study consists of 43 independent living volunteers who will answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to 14 questions about possible symptoms pertaining to their own body systems. Then, the same volunteers will have a Registered Nurse independently perform a “standard” head-to-toe nursing assessment for comparison. This assessment will be repeated on a second occasion separated by more than 24 hours.

This study is funded by the Florence A. Rothman Institute (www.farinstitute.org) under the auspices of the Institutional Review Board of Sarasota Memorial Healthcare System.

We hope to have results to share from this study in the coming weeks.

In recent months, Plymouth Harbor engaged in a competitive graduate student project with architectural students from the University of Florida’s CityLab-Sarasota campus. We worked with six students enrolled in a master’s seminar under the instruction of adjunct professor and celebrated local architect, Guy Peterson.

Through this partnership, the major project for the seminar was decided to be the porte cochère on the ground level entrance of our new Northwest Garden Building. As the main point of entry to the new building, the porte cochère’s design served as an important, hands-on project for the students. The students worked in pairs, forming three teams. From there, each team was given a period of three months to outline their design and a stipend of $1,000 for any materials needed for their involvement in the project.

Guy Peterson, George McGonagill (Plymouth Harbor’s Vice President of Facilities), and Lorraine Enwright (THW Architects), worked with the students to identify the scope of the project, budget, structural parameters, and a materials list that was consistent with that of the building. Becky Pazkowski (Plymouth Harbor’s Senior Vice President of Philanthropy) served as Program Advisor, while George served in the role of Construction Advisor.

At the completion of the project, students were asked to present their designs for consideration for a first, second, or third prize. The first place pair received a $5,000 prize, second received $3,000, and third received $1,000, each to be split between the two team members. The first place award was supported by residents Marie and Tom Belcher, and the second and third place awards were supported by resident Charles Gehrie.

On Friday, May 5, the students presented their respective projects to Plymouth Harbor’s selection committee, and were called back to Plymouth Harbor on Monday, May 8, for the award announcements.

Each design was impressive, and one stood out among the rest. Offering a sophisticated, modern design, the first place winner met the requirements for the scope of the project above all others (rendering pictured on page 1. Please note: this is only a rendering, not an actual depiction of the final product). In the coming months, we will incorporate much of this design into the final plans for the Northwest Garden.

Plymouth Harbor was proud to collaborate with these talented students, four of whom are now graduates with their Master of Architecture degrees.

Below are the student teams, by prize:

1st Prize: Gabriella Ebbesson & Miranda Crowe
2nd Prize: Elena Nonino & Olivia Ellsworth
3rd Prize: Brittany Perez & Francia Salazar

 
 

True of most scientists, Charles Miller knew what he wanted to do from a young age. “It goes back to when I was a boy, wiring light bulbs with my father and putting extension cords in the house,” he remembers. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Charles didn’t experience the glamour most associate with the city. “It’s like any other city – it has the persona of Hollywood over it, but underneath there’s a city of ordinary people doing ordinary things.”

Far from ordinary, Charles went on to earn both his B.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. In his senior year of college in 1952, Charles met his first wife. “I met her as I met both of my wives – on the telephone,” he laughs. His friend was on the phone with a girl, Anne-Marie, and handed it to Charles. They ended up hitting it off, Charles invited her to a party, and the rest was history when they married a year and a half later.

In his last semester of graduate school, Charles’ professor asked if he would be interested in a one-year teaching position at Amherst College. Charles accepted, and when his term came to a close, he ended up enjoying the experience so much that he looked for a similar opportunity nearby. He landed at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where he stayed for the next 35 years. His wife, who was also a teacher, taught education at Central Connecticut State University. Charles and his wife had two daughters — and it comes as no surprise that their daughters are both teachers today.

In contrast, Cynthia Lichtenstein was born and raised on the East Coast in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. She studied at Radcliffe College of Harvard University in Massachusetts and graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Russian History and Literature. “With my degree, my choices were to get a Ph.D. and teach, or to work for the government.”

During her final semester of college in 1955, Cynthia decided to take the exam to work for the U.S. State Department. She did well enough that she was given an oral exam, but that was as far as she would get. “One of the examiners was kind enough to say, ‘Don’t feel badly when you do not pass this. We do not take women,’” she remembers. Despite the setback, Cynthia was not discouraged. She had a friend who was studying at Harvard Law School, and when she began arguing a case with him, he suggested that she go to law school. Without too much consideration, she took the LSAT, scored in the top percentile, and applied.

Cynthia’s parents, however, did not want her to attend law school. Instead, they gave her a trip to Paris for graduation, and when she returned, the only job she could find was as a secretary. “I was dreadful at it,” she laughs. “I couldn’t do two things at once. But at the time, it wasn’t usual for young women to go to law school.” After she was let go from her job as a secretary, Cynthia followed her instincts, borrowed the money from an uncle, and attended Yale Law School.
 
Cynthia met her first husband when in Paris, and after graduation from Yale, went to work as an associate at a Wall Street firm. She worked full-time for two years before they began their family. While pregnant with her first child, Cynthia began a two-year program through the Ford Foundation, which was offering scholarships to study civil law for one year at the University of Chicago and a second year internship abroad. After Chicago, Cynthia’s husband got a job at the Economist in London, while she began her internship at the European Economic Community (EEC) in Brussels, where she worked on EEC African projects.

In 1963, Cynthia returned part-time to her firm in New York. But in 1971, she decided to explore a different career path. By this time, she was raising three children, her husband was in Boston working at MIT, and because she couldn’t commit to working full-time, her firm would not make her a partner. A friend recommended her for a teaching position at Boston College Law School, and she accepted — as their second female professor.

While Cynthia had a newfound love for teaching, she had her work cut out for her with 140 students in one class and 90 in another. Balancing work and home life, she taught corporate finance (including securities law) and contracts. She was also the second in the country to teach a course in international economic law at a law school. After five years in Boston, Cynthia and her husband divorced.

In 1984, Cynthia met Charles — who had been widowed two years before — over the phone. A mutual friend set them up, and Cynthia invited Charles to Boston for dinner. When he showed up with a loaf of bread and a bottle of wine, Cynthia fell in love. A year and a half later they were married.

After several years of a commuter marriage, Cynthia convinced Charles to take early retirement. He taught half the year for five years and then made the move. Cynthia retired from Boston College in 2001, but worked as a visiting professor at George Washington University Law School for four falls after that. The couple spent winters on their boat in Fort Myers, before coming to Sarasota and looking into Plymouth Harbor at the suggestion of friends.

Today, Charles and Cynthia spend half their time here and the other half at their home in Stonington, Connecticut. In his spare time, Charles reads with the Shakespeare Group and enjoys the Physics Club he co-founded nearly 10 years ago. Cynthia keeps busy with several law organizations. She is a panelist for NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) Chapter 19, and is occasionally appointed to hear cases. Up until the last year, she was a Vice Chair of the Executive Council of the International Law Association, which meets every six months in London.

Additionally, Cynthia worked with the International Law Students Association, which puts on the annual Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Today, she serves as a coach for Booker High School’s mock trial and appellate cases. This program works with students interested in law and allows them to compete in Florida-wide mock trials and appeals that go all the way up to Florida’s mock Supreme Court.

With a passion for life and a continued commitment to their work, there is surely more to come from Charles Miller and Cynthia Lichtenstein.

Located on Orange Avenue in downtown Sarasota, the Woman’s Exchange is a consignment store like no other. It began in 1962 with the idea to create a business means of supporting local arts in Sarasota and Manatee counties. The Woman’s Exchange was formed as a result, offering affordably priced treasures like Tiffany silver, Gucci handbags, fine jewelry, women’s clothing, high-end furniture, oriental rugs, and more. In fact, Lara Spencer of ABC’s “Good Morning America” and PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow” even lists the Woman’s Exchange as one of her favorite places to shop in her book, I Brake for Yard Sales

Along with a staff of nearly 20 employees, the 12,000 square foot store has over 230 dedicated volunteers who ensure that the ever-changing inventory is filled to the brim. Individuals are able to designate specific participating charities to receive their consignor profits, which is 65 percent of sale price. Additionally, any unsold clothing, furniture, and household items are typically donated to other local non-profit organizations, such as the Salvation Army and the Pines of Sarasota.

Through its consignment operation, the Woman’s Exchange has awarded more than $7.8 million in grants and scholarships to support the arts of Sarasota and Manatee, such as the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall, Asolo Theatre, Sarasota Opera, student scholarships, and more.

Resident Barbara MacLean became involved with the Woman’s Exchange nearly 26 years ago. At the suggestion of a friend, Barbara began as a seasonal volunteer when she and her husband spent their winters on Longboat Key, and continued her involvement when they moved to Sarasota full-time. Barbara works at the front desk, helping to check out customers and package their items. “The fun part is getting to know the customers,” she says. “People come from all over — New Hampshire, Maine, New Jersey, and some even drive up from Venice and Naples.”

Residents Mary Allyn and Weta Cannon began volunteering at the Woman’s Exchange five years ago. The two were instrumental in establishing the Encore! & More Consignment Shop, which benefited the Women’s Resource Center, and when it closed its doors, they decided to focus their efforts on the Woman’s Exchange. Once a week, they volunteer together doing pricing and computer input. “We think the world of the Woman’s Exchange team,” Mary says. Weta adds, “It’s an amazing organization in terms of its financial and moral support of the arts in our community. They really do a wonderful job.”

In addition to volunteering, numerous Plymouth Harbor residents support the mission of the Woman’s Exchange by both consigning and donating. To learn more, you may visit their website at www.SarasotaWEX.com.

 

By: Judy Sarnowski, ADC, CDP, Smith Care Center’s Activity Director

In any Skilled Nursing Facility, this adage unfortunately holds true when attempting to design an activity calendar that fits the leisure patterns of adults who have diverse backgrounds, levels of education, and religious preferences. Throw varying degrees of cognition into the mix and the challenge to provide activities that appeal to the majority of your residents, becomes
even greater.

Experienced activity directors know that the key to developing a successful program is to find a common thread within the patchwork quilt of each person’s interests, the three most common being some form of exercise, music, and reading. Once that is accomplished, the task of providing activities that have a global appeal to your resident population becomes much simpler.

The next step is to simplify each activity into segments that can be altered to match each resident’s specific abilities. Variations of card games like UNO allow residents with varying levels of cognitive ability the opportunity to participate and enjoy a positive experience. Adaptive devices and task segmentation can also be used to facilitate the participation of a large group of residents in a single activity.

For example, the task of building a birdhouse could evolve into a successful activity simply by assigning the more difficult aspects of the project, like measuring and cutting, to residents capable of performing these tasks, and allowing those with cognitive or physical limitations the opportunity to perform simpler tasks like sanding or painting.

In a Life Plan Community, activity offerings should address the individual needs and interests of residents within their specific level of care. At times, this can be difficult to achieve as residents whose needs are ever-increasing are unable to move through the care continuum due to lack of available space. As Plymouth Harbor nears the completion of our Northwest Garden Building —complete with state-of-the-art Memory Care and Assisted Living Residences — we will be able to offer enhanced activities for each individual resident and accommodate the influx of people searching for the ultimate destination in which to live life to the fullest.

 

Judy Liersch had a colorful childhood, growing up in Montréal with her parents and two younger sisters. As the second largest French-speaking city after Paris, only about 15 percent of the population was English. Judy’s family was English, but she learned to speak French and attended the same all-girls private school her mother had 25 years earlier. “We were very free and independent,” she remembers. “We grew up in a time where we could be turned loose after school and on weekends and my mother could say, ‘be back before dark.’”
 
After high school, Judy’s parents wanted her to experience life beyond Montréal and encouraged her to apply to other colleges, not only McGill University — but with one condition: no further than 500 miles away. Determined to attend a co-ed university, Judy settled on Cornell, where she majored in cultural anthropology.

During her last semester of college, Judy had a stroke of good luck on a family vacation when she met a man who was a senior manager at IBM. He told Judy to give him a call when she graduated, and she did just that, arriving at IBM’s Wall Street sales office in 1957. Trained as a Systems Service Girl, Judy wired control panels for the accounting machines used by stock brokerage firms and programmed one of the first commercial computers, the IBM Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC).

After a couple of years, Judy decided to get back to her anthropology interests. Her former academic advisor, a Japanese specialist, suggested looking into a teaching job in Japan. She applied to the Canadian Academy (a former missionary school) in Kobe but there were no openings for the upcoming school year — they suggested she try again the following year. She did, and was offered a position teaching second grade. Judy left from Seattle on an old Japanese ship with a two-week voyage ahead of her. Along the way, she befriended two other teachers heading to her school and a Japanese-Canadian artist, who became a life-long friend.

Judy arrived in Japan in 1959. Her K-12 boarding/day school served children from the international community in Kobe — Chinese, Korean, and English — all who spoke at least English and Japanese. While Judy wasn’t really fluent in Japanese, she learned enough to get by, traveling far and wide in her time there. “The exchange rate back then was 360 Yen to the dollar,” Judy says. “We would go to the Japanese Travel Bureau and ask what ryokan accommodations they had available for 500 Yen, which included dinner and breakfast. We hit a lot of the major sights like Kyoto, Shiga Kogen (skiing), Hiroshima, and the island of Kyushu.” Judy’s mother came to visit the summer after her first year in Japan.

“Years later I learned that my father had dispatched her to make sure that I came home,” she laughs. After another school year, Judy returned to New York City and worked at a small publishing firm. Not long after, she transitioned into a job at Time Inc. as a picture researcher. The catch, however, was that the position was in Time’s Montréal office. Judy gladly accepted the job with the stipulation that Time would eventually bring her back to New York. After a few years, Time made good on its promise, and Judy came back to New York as a computer programmer. Although she had experience in first generation computers, she had to be retrained in the third generation, with a unique specialty – typesetting and hyphenation.
 
“Remember that Time Magazine has very narrow columns,” Judy says. “Twenty-five percent of the lines have to be hyphenated. The computer system wasn’t very sophisticated and it had a fairly high hyphenation error rate.” So, Judy was assigned to develop an improved system that reduced the hyphenation error rate by building a dictionary of correctly hyphenated words. As a result, only new words had to be flagged in the copy editing process, improving the accuracy rate from 93 to 99 percent.
 
In 1971, Judy was accepted to Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. In a class of 300, she was one of 19 women. While there, Judy was fascinated by a new program in public management and quickly decided this was the career for her. She was later offered a job with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and after gaining her U.S. citizenship, Judy arrived in Washington, D.C., in 1973 — at the height of the Nixon Administration’s Watergate scandal and the OPEC oil crisis.

At the end of Judy’s six-year stint in Washington, she had worked in five different government offices, including OMB, the Federal Energy Office, the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Department of Energy (DOE). “I was changing offices, bosses, or programs constantly,” she says.

In 1979, the DOE had appointed a new director of its national laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The laboratory was not only hiring, but keen on hiring women managers. Judy interviewed and landed the job of Assistant Director for Government Relations. “While I had the right experience in Washington, this turned out to be a very hard job for two reasons – I was a woman and I was not a scientist,” Judy says. She stuck it out for four years and then transitioned into a line management job where she was in charge of publishing operations, the library, and museum.
 
At Los Alamos, Judy shared a wall with the Chief Financial Officer/Controller, who apparently wrote very loudly, and often, on his blackboard. One time while he was traveling, Judy decided to replace it with a white board. She left a message on it that read, “Confucius say he who have loud blackboard need quiet white board.” The CFO’s name? Allen Jennings.

Judy and Allen married in 1988. After more than 12 years living in Sante Fe and working at Los Alamos, the two retired in 1992. They returned to Washington, D.C., for three years, where they explored the city, reconnected with friends, and traveled to places like China, Egypt, Peru, and South Africa. After a few years back in New Mexico, Judy and Allen wintered in Venice, Florida, and eventually relocated full-time to Nokomis.

The couple moved into Plymouth Harbor in 2011. Today, Judy and Allen enjoy staying active in the community and spending their summers at their condo in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Judy is a longtime supporter of the Women’s Resource Center, the Sarasota Orchestra, and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. Within Plymouth Harbor, she is a member of the program and dining committees and has been actively involved with the annual Committee Fair. She and Esther Jensen also reach out to local artists and select those who exhibit in the Mezzanine Gallery.

 

Among the top reasons for moving into a Life Plan Community is a sense of security. Security, however, can take on several forms. By moving into Plymouth Harbor, residents can let go of their worries and take comfort in the fact that they will always be cared for. With helpful, friendly staff and a full continuum of care, residents know that any future needs can be provided within the community.

Furthermore, there is an increased sense of safety, freedom, and community — as residents are no longer responsible for the day-to-day demands of homeownership and are able to get to know their neighbors and engage in an abundance of new activities. Of course, there is also the added benefit of 24/7 security monitoring and security staff.

In total, Plymouth Harbor has 13 security officers, who each have first responder experience in a variety of different backgrounds —including law enforcement, military, and general security. In fact, combined experience in the security department here at Plymouth Harbor is more than 275 years. On any given day, there are three security personnel on campus during the day shift, and two during the second and third shifts. Throughout the entire campus, there are over 40 security cameras, with plans to install several additional cameras after the completion of the Northwest Garden Building.

While you may see and know many members of the security team, there is much that goes on behind the scenes. During each shift, security staff provide mobile and foot patrol of the campus; respond to alarms; aid with resident/guest assistance; assist in parking; provide shuttle service; guard against theft; maintain overall security; and write reports of daily activities and irregularities, such as equipment or property damage, theft, trespassers, or unusual occurrences. The Front Desk also aids in the security process by facilitating calls and serving as campus watch, keeping a close eye on all closed-circuit security cameras.

What sets Plymouth Harbor’s security team apart? According to Lyall Smith, Director of Concierge and Security Services, their willingness to go the extra mile, cooperating with all other departments. “Oftentimes, security staff are the only ones on campus after hours to assist with numerous requests, from simple to complex challenges,” he adds. “Plymouth Harbor is a ‘mini city,’ which creates similar demands of our security officers as they are the first responders on duty.”

In the January 2017 issue of Harbor Light, we introduced the Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) clinicals program from Suncoast Technical College (STC) that is partnering with our Smith Care Center. Now, we’d like to introduce STC’s Certified Nursing Assistant program, which began working with the SCC at the end of February.

This program, known as the Health Careers Program, is the first step toward a future in nursing for many students. The program works with high school juniors and seniors from schools across the county who are interested in both nursing and overall healthcare.

In their first semester, students learn about the broader spectrum of healthcare; in their second semester, they focus on nursing curriculum. During this time, students perform clinicals for the period of one month at various facilities in the area, including Plymouth Harbor — spending half the day on their school campus and the other half performing clinicals. At the completion of the program, students have the option to take the state CNA Exam. While many choose this option, others decide to further their nursing education and enroll in STC’s LPN program.

According to Clinical Instructor Linda Hart, RN, MSN, STC is the only high school program that offers training in hands-on patient care. Linda joined STC 16 years ago, and throughout the years, she has seen the program grow from three students to over 160. Today, the program has anywhere from nine to 13 students onsite with instructors. In the SCC, students are paired with a CNA, and are able to assist with items such as denture care, hair and nail care, range-of-motion exercises, meal assistance, and more. “It’s a natural fit because many of Plymouth Harbor’s nurses graduated from this program,” Linda says.

Karen Novak, SCC Director of Health Services, adds, “Care is the essence of nursing and the dominant, distinctive, and unifying feature.” She goes on to say that care is taught day-by-day by working with the novice learner. Stepping into a new environment can overwhelm anyone, but the nurses in the SCC help to guide STC’s students through their first experiences in healthcare, giving them permission to ask questions, seek out answers, and learn as much as possible in the process.

“It’s the joy of my life. This program changes our students’ lives,” Linda says. “It gives them confidence and a purpose for learning — what a gift.”