Resident David Beliles discusses his childhood, living through the Depression, and building his own newspaper business, with the help of his wife, Ruth, into what we know today as The Observer Group.

View his June 2017 Insights presentation here:
 

 

An only child born in Boston during the Great Depression, Reina Troiano lived a life of self-exploration. After high school, Reina says she “lived life backwards.” She went directly into the working world, holding many different positions, from a file clerk to advertising to working for a personnel agency and even modeling. It wasn’t until she was in her 40s that Reina decided to go back to college, double-majoring in English and interdisciplinary social studies. Reina later went on to study for a master’s degree, leaving before graduation, and eventually landing a job in the U.S. Senate. What did she learn along the way?

View her April 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

Connie Meadows was born in Maryland, and graduated from the University of Connecticut with a degree in psychology. Connie’s first job was with a consulting fi rm, but in 1966, she moved to The Hague to work for the Insurance Company of North America. After becoming Director of the European region, she moved to Brussels for more than a decade. She eventually moved back to Maryland and formed a company that provided financial services and managedcondominiums. But she didn’t stop there – Connie then became CFO of Ocean Petroleum before retiring in 2000. What lead her into her many different careers?

View her March 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

High school sweethearts Tom and Sue Elliott are originally from Toledo, Ohio. Tom graduated from Alma College with a degree in biology, and Sue graduated from the University of Toledo with a degree as a registered medical technologist. After Tom served in the Army in West Germany, the two traveled Europe before returning to the U.S. Upon their return, Sue focused on volunteer work and Tom earned his master’s degree before starting work at Applied Science Associates – where he helped build the company from three employees to over 150 when he retired.

How did he accomplish this growth? And what is the meaning behind the name of their talk?

View their February 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

After receiving his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from Cornell University, Dr. Lou Newman moved to Montana and developed a veterinary practice, a wholesale drug supply business, and a cattle ranch. He later made the decision to join the faculty of Michigan State University’s Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, where he completed his Ph.D. in Veterinary Pathology. Dr. Newman went on to work with two more universities before retiring and focusing on his passion for photography.

Has he always had a desire to work with animals? And what are his surprising stories from time spent with cowboys and cattle?

View his January 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

picture1-9The phrase coined for our 50th anniversary stated, Plymouth Harbor celebrates our past and envisions our future.

January 15, 2017, will mark Plymouth Harbor’s 51st year — as we look back, we thank our founder, The Rev. Dr. John Whitney MacNeil, and our many supporters: employees, residents, their families, board members, donors, and members of the community. We also look to the future, seeking ways to innovate and improve for both current and future residents, who we hope will enjoy Plymouth Harbor for more than 50 years to come.

The future is bright for Plymouth Harbor, located in beautiful Sarasota, which has been consistently ranked as one of the top places to live, work, and retire (No. 1 on Gallup-Healthways 2015 Well-Being Index; No. 14 on U.S. News and World Report’s ‘Best City To Live In 2016;’ and No. 2 on Livability’s 2015 Top 10 Places to Retire, to name a few).

A new attribute for Sarasota is that of  “one of the best ‘small cities’ in the U.S.,” on Condé Nast Traveler’s 2016 list. This list features the top 15 small cities around the U.S. as voted by more than 100,000 readers, highlighting cities that may be scaled down in size, but still offer big-city entertainment and activities.

Plymouth Harbor itself stands as a “small city” — a close-knit community focused on the best in daily living, dining, wellness, and care for our residents. When we look to the future, we realize the definition of “the best” will certainly change over time.

 According to a recent survey by Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, emerging trends in our industry point to items like increased use of technology to help sustain independent lifestyles; the expansion of services “beyond” the walls of the organization; and the biggest trend seen across the U.S.— an increased emphasis on choice and value. Older adults want more choices, more control, a redefinition of what community means, and convenience both inside and outside of the community.

Whatever the future holds, Plymouth Harbor is committed to evolving and revolutionizing care for our residents in the years ahead.

 

By: Resident Elsa Price

img_1025In stoic beauty and stately elegance stands Plymouth Harbor, the tallest building in our fair city, her statuesque posture marking a landmark of distinction and excellence. This is home to many embraced as “family” with people from all walks of life! This is where 24 years ago my late husband Don and I found our lovely new home in the tower on the 23rd floor, where the horizon meets the sky in a breathtaking vista!

As a “long-term” resident may I reminisce a bit?     Perhaps it may seem as though you have moved into a “construction zone” with the noise of huge rumbling trucks,  the jarring staccato of  jackhammering from somewhere within, the tall cranes piercing the sky, and the daily rush of the many contractors as they sprint, charts in hand, up and down the floors. This, I note with great satisfaction, is commonly referred to as progress!

Believe me, it was not this way many years ago when a dreary, lifeless color coated the entire outside of the building, including all inside halls and doors of each and every floor! It was not unlike a hotel, when one could not distinguish his room from all the others! Today, with the changes in administration over time, and the inspiration, motivation, and originality of incoming new residents, each floor now boasts lively colors, inviting those who live behind these doors to step out and greet their neighbors with a smile!

Of course, all this did not just “happen,” but rather it took the courage and initiative of many people throughout the years. These “visionaries” believed that beneath the drab, stark outward appearance of our building, it was quite promising that with a team of very talented, resourceful, and innovative people, miracles could happen! Indeed, happen they did!

With careful planning to the future needs of our expanding population, our small, rather bleak dining room was transformed to a spacious, cheerful welcoming area with attractive furniture and lovely artwork on the walls.

Keeping in mind first impressions matter, our previous nondescript lobby became a maze of “staging forms,” extending out from the elevators to the front desk so that a new look could be created, and residents tread carefully for many days under the complex network of scaffolding to get to our dining room! Attractive new facings enhanced the elevator doors, nonslip tile was laid on the lobby floor, and our mailboxes and front desk were reconfigured for greater vision for those working behind the desk. This was not without myriad confusion and provided an unforgettable exercise in patience!

Pilgrim Hall, our “gathering place” for many functions, holds a multitude of memories years past when residents whose latent theatrical talents blossomed as they enjoyed performing “on stage.” These very amusing, hilarious plays written by some of our more creative residents, whose previous vocation had been in the landscape of playwriting,  somehow always managed to project a satire or caricature of a “happening” within our hallowed halls! I was even inspired to participate in several of these plays and found the experience challenging, gratifying, and a real test of one’s memory! It is reassuring to know that Pilgrim Hall, currently undergoing extensive renovation, will provide our residents a bright, comfortable area in which to once again enjoy a multitude of diverse activities and programs.

As we age, exercise and mobility becomes more important, and that very fact is admirably reflected in our state-of-the-art Wellness Center. Careful attention and thought were given to the safety and the needs of residents, and instructors and trainers were hired with excellent credentials who would maintain the highest standards required. The pleasing ambiance of our Wellness Center beckons those who wish to find strength, relaxation, and companionship.

In the near future, we will have the very best that life has to offer with the completion of our new, much anticipated, “Memory Care Residence,” housed within the Northwest Garden Building, with a dedicated focus on creating a loving, safe retreat for those who require that very special care. The living areas will be thoughtfully designed with cheerful colors providing a soothing atmosphere, and will provide hope, peace, and joy to all who enter there, that each may live life with serenity and dignity as they make their final journey.

It is with a grateful heart that I pause and reflect on nearly 24 years in my home in the Tower, living within a vibrant community of people, where I have made lasting friends, and where new companions are warmly welcomed.  For many years I have watched as “Plymouth Harbor on Sarasota Bay” has evolved into the impressive structure we see today.

Maintaining this level of excellence will continue to be guided, advised, and directed by our capable administration and staff who prudently calculate and project our future needs with foresight and transparency, always keeping us well informed.

And so it is, the “saga” of the THEN, and NOW!

Your friend and neighbor,

Elsa Price, T-2301

 

Ann Burroughs has been an artist all her life – from oil painting to printmaking to working as a metal smith fusing gold, silver, brass, and copper. Her work with metal ranges from heavy casting to jewelry, some of which is created here in the Wood Shop. Born in Flint, Michigan, Ann attended Mount Vernon Seminary as a boarding student and received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from both the University of Colorado and the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit. How did she develop such an interest in the arts?

View Ann’s October Insights presentation to find out:

Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoardInsights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to Phil Starr, each Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.

 

Jack Denison is a graduate of Princeton University and served in the U.S. Army Field Artillery during WWII in England, Germany, and France. After that, he served a short time with the U.S. State Department and went on to spend his entire business career with the American Hospital Supply Corp. As president of the Export Division and a lead strategist for various sales and marketing projects, Jack traveled extensively in the Middle East, South America, and Japan. After retiring, Jack did volunteer work that brought him to Jordan, Egypt, Poland, Costa Rica, and Romania. What was it like traveling to so many different countries? And what is the meaning behind the title of his talk? Join us to find out!

View his September Insights presentation to find out:

Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoardInsights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to Phil Starr, each Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.

 

Nancy and Jerry Kaplan married after college. Nancy, while raising three children, worked as a professional artist, and at age 50, trained and then worked as a Registered Nurse. As a teenager, Jerry contracted Polio. Despite the lifelong effects, he started and operated a business for 15 years before working for 30 years as an elementary school teacher and principal. What led these two down their respective career paths?

 

View their August Insights presentation to find out:

Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoardInsights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to Phil Starr, each Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.