Every Tuesday on the Mezzanine, you can now find a competitive game of duplicate bridge going on. Organized under the American Contract Bridge League, Plymouth Harbor has recently started a sanctioned duplicate bridge game. Margaret Tominosky serves as the game’s certified director. She knows the laws of Duplicate Bridge and keeps track of points, which she then submits to the American Contract Bridge League. At these games, players earn master points which allow them to move up in rank. “People strive to become a life master, but there are more achievements beyond
that,” Margaret said.

There are currently eight Bridge tables set up, but that number is expected to grow to 10 or more when residents return during season. The Plymouth Harbor game is invitational, and all residents and Harbor Club members are invited to play. Residents and Harbor Club members may invite any guest they wish. There is an $8 fee per game per person. As our players amass points, there are opportunities for them to play at larger local, regional, and national tournaments.

Joyce Steele, resident, is a huge supporter of Duplicate Bridge and helped bring the sanctioned game to Plymouth Harbor. “When we moved to Plymouth Harbor six months ago, it seemed to me that the only thing missing in the vast amount of amenities that Plymouth provides was a sanctioned duplicate bridge game,” Joyce said. Joyce went on to interview many directors for the position, looking for someone who not only had the necessary abilities but who would also be a good teacher. “Margaret gave me a good deal of advice about directors that she knew and after many phone calls I told her the very best person for this job is her,” Joyce said. “When she said she would do it, I knew we had gotten the best director in seven counties for Plymouth Harbor.”

“There are many people at Plymouth Harbor for whom Bridge has been a huge part of their lives,” Margaret said. “To be able to play competitively without having to leave home is a wonderful opportunity.” Results of our games can be found online at Unit102.com, along with other local clubs, results, and players.

Margaret offers complimentary mini-lessons on Tuesdays before the game from 12:30-1 p.m. “Anyone is welcome to come to the lesson, whether they stay to play or not,” she said. Margaret started a similar club at Bay Village prior to helping Plymouth Harbor start one. “I am very much in favor of people being able to play competitive bridge as long as they are able,” she said. If you have any questions or would like to make a reservation or request a partner, please contact Margaret at motominosky@comcast.net or 941-223-3712.

Earth day originated on April 22, 1970 and is considered to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. Ideated by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, Earth Day was meant to serve as a “national teach-in on the environment” that would educate the masses about the effects our actions have on the health of our planet. While most of America remained largely unaware of growing environmental concerns prior to April 22, 1970, the first celebration of Earth Day brought these concerns to center stage.

Drawing from the energy of the anti-war protest movement, the first Earth Day saw 20 million Americans participate in rallies and demonstrations highlighting the need for greener practices. By the end of 1970, the United States Environmental Protection Agency had been created, and the Clear Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts had all been passed. In 1990, Earth Day became globally recognized, with 200 million people in over 140 nations participating, according to the Earth Day Network (EDN), a nonprofit organization that coordinates Earth Day activities. It has since grown into an internationally celebrated holiday that focuses on how to live a more eco-friendly life. The EDN estimates that more than 1 billion people are involved in Earth Day activities every year, making it “the largest secular civic event in the world.”

Thirteen years ago, a group of environmentally-minded residents came together to find ways to bring the movement to Plymouth Harbor. This was the beginning of the Conservation Committee, which then became a formal committee three years later. Now, members of the committee share a common mission: to promote conservation of resources within Plymouth Harbor, including recycling, water, and electricity usage, and other appropriate conservation measures. The committee also researches and makes recommendations on ways in which Plymouth Harbor may become more environmentally responsible.

“Our biggest job is to educate residents on simple ways to conserve resources,” said Isabel Pedersen. Tips and tricks can be found in the weekly flyer, and residents are encouraged to try to incorporate these small changes into their daily routines. “Although independently they don’t sound like much, lots of little things can add up and make a big change,” Isabel said.
If you want to learn more about the Conservation Committee, contact Isabel at ext. 561. There are also Conservation Committee liaisons in each colony. Although new committee members won’t be chosen until next year, you can still act as a role model for others by putting into place environmentally friendly practices.

While turning off lights and recycling are what you initially think of when you think about conserving resources, those aren’t the only ways. Conserving resources also means finding new uses or new homes for things you already have. Instead of throwing away old clothing, household items, and furniture, donate them to the Resident Fund Shop or the donation collection bins located on the Ground Floor of the Tower. These four organizations (All Faiths Food Bank, Resurrection House, Sarasota County Animal Services, and Meals on Wheels) and our Fund shop put our reusable items to good use and prevents the need for someone to buy something new that they can get used.

To celebrate Earth Day this year, the Conservation Committee will have a table set up in the lobby where you can get reusable cloth grocery bags, reusable water bottles, and information about what Plymouth Harbor is doing to reduce our footprint. Someone will be at the table throughout the day to answer questions, so make sure you stop by!

Sources: www.earthday.org, www.history.com

On January 30, Plymouth Harbor will be seeing snow for the first time since 2015, but not the cold, white kind that falls from the sky. Teepa Snow, a leading educator on dementia, will be on campus to teach residents, staff, board members, and community partners about dementia and her Positive Approach™ to Care.

As an occupational therapist with more than 30 years of clinical experience in the field of dementia, Teepa has become an advocate for those with dementia. She has made it her mission to help people better understand what it is like to live with the challenges that accompany the condition and to change the way people think about it.

In 2005, she founded her own company, the Positive Approach™ to Care, to teach people how to effectively and compassionately work with those living with neurocognitive degeneration. The Positive Approach™ to Care (PAC) uses the GEMS® States model for brain change, Teepa’s own creation that focuses on retained abilities instead of those that are lost. “Rewiring our own perceptions, attitudes, communication strategies, actions, and responses provides the shift that promotes change for others around us,” says Teepa on her website. Through the PAC and using the GEMS® States model, she now educates family and professional care providers across the world, but mainly in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K.

“Snow Day,” as we like to call her visit, will span from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., allowing Teepa time with all members of our Plymouth Harbor community so that we can all learn how to better care for those with dementia. Teepa will have specific sessions dedicated to each of our constituents, beginning with staff, caregivers, and area partners, then residents and Harbor Club members, and finally our board members.

This year, we have combined “Snow Day” with our annual Doyle Trust Lecture, and she will serve as the annual event’s keynote speaker. “We are very proud to bring Teepa here for the inaugural Doyle Trust Lecture,” says Becky Pazkowski, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy. “The Doyles were residents here and I’d imagine would be very pleased to know that care for all kinds of conditions, including dementia, has expanded over the years. With their legacy, we are able to offer an even broader educational opportunity.”

Teepa has visited Plymouth Harbor once before in March of 2015, before the Northwest Garden Building was built, for our first “Snow Day.” This time around, in addition to speaking to our residents and staff, Teepa will tour the Starr Memory Care Residence. We are excited to show her the supportive, state-of-the-art environment created for our residents thanks to the careful thought and ingenuity of the Plymouth Harbor team and THW, the architectural and design firm. We are so proud of our residence, and this will serve as a rare occasion for us to show Teepa how the design of the space and the program has been influenced by her own positive approach.

Brandi Burgess, Interim Administrator of Assisted Living and Memory Care, is a certified PAC trainer and has worked hard to incorporate Teepa’s approach into the way Plymouth Harbor cares for its residents. “The tenets of her program are that if caregivers understand what is happening physically and cognitively to those with dementia, we can identify the levels of progression and remaining strengths in the moment,” Brandi said.

More information about Teepa and the Positive Approach™ to Care and the GEMS® States model for brain change can be found online at TeepaSnow.com.