On October 10th, the Plymouth Harbor Foundation gathered its major donors and supporters of the Scholarship Program at the Sarasota Yacht Club to celebrate their philanthropic commitments and goodwill. “Over $115,000 was awarded this year to 22 Plymouth Harbor employees and their children” announced Jay Price, Chair of the Plymouth Harbor Foundation, “which includes all the students who renewed their Doyle Scholarships this year, an amazing feat of accomplishment.”

Beth Watson thanked all the donors for their thoughtfulness in wanting to help our truly deserving employees fulfill their dream of an education. The guests had the opportunity to meet some of this year’s scholarship recipients who eloquently shared how the donor’s investment in them has impacted their lives.

Plymouth Harbor’s Human Resources Recruiter Stephen Moros, a recipient of the Doyle Scholarship, explained how he was teaching tennis lessons part-time to pay for his Master’s Degree, taking even more precious time away from his wife and 8-month-old daughter Sophia. “Not only was this a gift of education, but also the gift of time with my family,” Stephen said. “Now I won’t have to miss those precious first milestones and bonding experiences. This scholarship was life-changing for me.”

Many others echoed the same sentiments as Stephen, emphasizing how much the scholarships means to them, their family, and their lives. Closing remarks included comments from Ky Thompson, Plymouth Harbor resident since 2016, who said “The Bible tells us that it is more blessed to give than receive….the very act of giving brings a tremendous sense of satisfaction and the elation of knowing that, through your beneficence, you have enabled another human being to attain their full potential.”

He went on to say “Harry provides Plymouth Harbor with clarion leadership. As our CEO, he finds himself thanking others for all they do for Plymouth Harbor. Perhaps not enough thanks are given to Harry, so before I sit down, I’d like to say thanks to Harry for all you do for us!”

Bill Johnston recognized Bruce Crawford, Tom Towler and Harry Hobson for their vision to begin the Foundation in 2013 and congratulated them on the many successes it has achieved. Harry Hobson also recognized the Fund Shop Ladies who continuously donate very generously to PH Foundation’s Scholarship Program and thanked all for partnering with the Foundation in helping support our Plymouth Harbor family.

On Monday, September 16th, The Plymouth Harbor Foundation celebrated it’s MacNeil Society members with a private service in the MacNeil chapel and reception. Roughly 60 guests attended, including members of the Foundation’s board of trustees.

President and CEO Harry Hobson gave welcoming remarks followed by Rev. Dick Sparrow, Plymouth Harbor’s resident chaplain, who gave a moving sermon about John MacNeil’s vision through the lens of Field of Dreams and the hope that “If you build it, they will come”. Resident Dr. Fred Moffat was then called upon to present his paper entitled “Reflections on The Happy Warrior, The Rev. Dr. John Whitney MacNeil”. This included a historical timeline of events on the visions and works of John MacNeil, Jack Smith and architect Lou Schneider, to the delight of their wives, Judy, Peg and Fran respectively, who were all in attendance. It was The Rev. Dr. Jack Smith, a skilled poet, who once wrote a tribute to John MacNeil for his loving and inspirational leadership, referring to him as the Happy Warrior named after William Wordsworth’s epic poem. “Dr. Moffat’s talk was quite the homage to these men who each made indelible marks on Plymouth Harbor” stated Beth Watson, Vice President of the Plymouth Harbor Foundation.

Jay Price, Chair of the Foundation, called for a moment of silence in announcing those MacNeil Society members who passed on since the year prior, and then presented lapel pins to the new members of the society. The Rev. Dr. Wes Bixby brought the service to a conclusion with a benediction while Greg Chestnut served as organist. Guests were then treated to food and refreshments, courtesy of Chef René and his staff, including make-your-own strawberry shortcake – a tribute to John MacNeil’s favorite dessert. “We are continually grateful to have donors who believe in the mission and commitment to the vision that Dr. MacNeil started some six decades ago” stated Harry Hobson.

Members of the MacNeil Society are those individuals who have thoughtfully included a gift to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation through their estate. Their gift has been named through a will, gift annuity agreement, trust agreement, life insurance policy, or retirement plan. For more information or to become a member of the society, please contact Beth Watson in The Plymouth Harbor Foundation office at extension 398 or bethw@plymouthharbor.org

Every Tuesday on the Mezzanine, you can now find a competitive game of duplicate bridge going on. Organized under the American Contract Bridge League, Plymouth Harbor has recently started a sanctioned duplicate bridge game. Margaret Tominosky serves as the game’s certified director. She knows the laws of Duplicate Bridge and keeps track of points, which she then submits to the American Contract Bridge League. At these games, players earn master points which allow them to move up in rank. “People strive to become a life master, but there are more achievements beyond
that,” Margaret said.

There are currently eight Bridge tables set up, but that number is expected to grow to 10 or more when residents return during season. The Plymouth Harbor game is invitational, and all residents and Harbor Club members are invited to play. Residents and Harbor Club members may invite any guest they wish. There is an $8 fee per game per person. As our players amass points, there are opportunities for them to play at larger local, regional, and national tournaments.

Joyce Steele, resident, is a huge supporter of Duplicate Bridge and helped bring the sanctioned game to Plymouth Harbor. “When we moved to Plymouth Harbor six months ago, it seemed to me that the only thing missing in the vast amount of amenities that Plymouth provides was a sanctioned duplicate bridge game,” Joyce said. Joyce went on to interview many directors for the position, looking for someone who not only had the necessary abilities but who would also be a good teacher. “Margaret gave me a good deal of advice about directors that she knew and after many phone calls I told her the very best person for this job is her,” Joyce said. “When she said she would do it, I knew we had gotten the best director in seven counties for Plymouth Harbor.”

“There are many people at Plymouth Harbor for whom Bridge has been a huge part of their lives,” Margaret said. “To be able to play competitively without having to leave home is a wonderful opportunity.” Results of our games can be found online at Unit102.com, along with other local clubs, results, and players.

Margaret offers complimentary mini-lessons on Tuesdays before the game from 12:30-1 p.m. “Anyone is welcome to come to the lesson, whether they stay to play or not,” she said. Margaret started a similar club at Bay Village prior to helping Plymouth Harbor start one. “I am very much in favor of people being able to play competitive bridge as long as they are able,” she said. If you have any questions or would like to make a reservation or request a partner, please contact Margaret at motominosky@comcast.net or 941-223-3712.

Earth day originated on April 22, 1970 and is considered to be the birth of the modern environmental movement. Ideated by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, Earth Day was meant to serve as a “national teach-in on the environment” that would educate the masses about the effects our actions have on the health of our planet. While most of America remained largely unaware of growing environmental concerns prior to April 22, 1970, the first celebration of Earth Day brought these concerns to center stage.

Drawing from the energy of the anti-war protest movement, the first Earth Day saw 20 million Americans participate in rallies and demonstrations highlighting the need for greener practices. By the end of 1970, the United States Environmental Protection Agency had been created, and the Clear Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts had all been passed. In 1990, Earth Day became globally recognized, with 200 million people in over 140 nations participating, according to the Earth Day Network (EDN), a nonprofit organization that coordinates Earth Day activities. It has since grown into an internationally celebrated holiday that focuses on how to live a more eco-friendly life. The EDN estimates that more than 1 billion people are involved in Earth Day activities every year, making it “the largest secular civic event in the world.”

Thirteen years ago, a group of environmentally-minded residents came together to find ways to bring the movement to Plymouth Harbor. This was the beginning of the Conservation Committee, which then became a formal committee three years later. Now, members of the committee share a common mission: to promote conservation of resources within Plymouth Harbor, including recycling, water, and electricity usage, and other appropriate conservation measures. The committee also researches and makes recommendations on ways in which Plymouth Harbor may become more environmentally responsible.

“Our biggest job is to educate residents on simple ways to conserve resources,” said Isabel Pedersen. Tips and tricks can be found in the weekly flyer, and residents are encouraged to try to incorporate these small changes into their daily routines. “Although independently they don’t sound like much, lots of little things can add up and make a big change,” Isabel said.
If you want to learn more about the Conservation Committee, contact Isabel at ext. 561. There are also Conservation Committee liaisons in each colony. Although new committee members won’t be chosen until next year, you can still act as a role model for others by putting into place environmentally friendly practices.

While turning off lights and recycling are what you initially think of when you think about conserving resources, those aren’t the only ways. Conserving resources also means finding new uses or new homes for things you already have. Instead of throwing away old clothing, household items, and furniture, donate them to the Resident Fund Shop or the donation collection bins located on the Ground Floor of the Tower. These four organizations (All Faiths Food Bank, Resurrection House, Sarasota County Animal Services, and Meals on Wheels) and our Fund shop put our reusable items to good use and prevents the need for someone to buy something new that they can get used.

To celebrate Earth Day this year, the Conservation Committee will have a table set up in the lobby where you can get reusable cloth grocery bags, reusable water bottles, and information about what Plymouth Harbor is doing to reduce our footprint. Someone will be at the table throughout the day to answer questions, so make sure you stop by!

Sources: www.earthday.org, www.history.com