Picture13Lisa Bradley has been an independent contractor with Plymouth Harbor for nearly two years, now teaching our Total Fitness class. She is an ACE (American Council on Exercise) certified personal trainer with over 15 years of experience specializing in senior fitness.

While Lisa is passionate about her work with seniors, she first got her start working in television. After majoring in TV production at New York University, she went on to work for ABC’s Good Morning America (GMA), handling the transportation of personalities and guests that were featured on the show. When Lisa married, she moved out to Connecticut and commuted to work in New York City. Eventually, after five years at GMA, Lisa and her husband relocated their three daughters (two of which are twins) from Connecticut to Columbus, Ohio, and, ultimately, Sarasota.

Lisa and her family moved into The Landings and she began work at a cardiac rehabilitation office. While there, she took an exercise class at Bath & Racquet Fitness Club. She had only taken the class two times when the teacher asked her to substitute, as she was the only one in the class who could do all of the exercises. She enjoyed it so much that she began working on her Personal Training certification shortly thereafter. While still working at the rehab office, Lisa was featured as one of the area’s top personal trainers in Sarasota’s Style Magazine. She received so many calls that she decided to work full time as a personal trainer and started her own company, Fit For Life of Sarasota.

In the early years of Fit For Life of Sarasota, Lisa mostly trained with senior clients who also lived in The Landings. Several years ago she branched out to teach classes and work with other larger organizations in the Sarasota area. Today, Lisa holds specialty certificates in Lifestyle and Weight Management, Exercise for Special Populations (i.e. diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, etc.), and Strength Training over 50. She is an avid runner and has participated in eight marathons, including the Sarasota Music Half Marathon and the Boston Marathon. In keeping with her love of working with seniors, Lisa has been a volunteer with Tidewell Hospice for 17 years. During that time, she has been awarded three President’s Volunteer Service Awards from President Obama.

Of her Total Fitness class here at Plymouth Harbor, Lisa says it enhances endurance and balance through standing and floor exercises, stretching, and static and dynamic balance exercises. “What I enjoy most about my class here is getting to know the residents and their stories,” she says. “I love talking with them, and I find the more you take people’s mind off working out, the more they enjoy it.”

To learn more, stop by Lisa’s class on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings, or find her information in the Wellness Center’s Preferred Professionals brochure.

 

Picture11According to the 2016 Point-in-Time Census — an annual census of the homeless population required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development — 497 homeless people were counted in Manatee County and 971 in Sarasota County. This represents an increase of nearly 23 percent from 2015.

Resurrection House, a faith-based day resource center for the homeless of Sarasota County, was created to help transition these at-risk individuals to a path of self-sufficiency. In its 26th year, Resurrection House has a small number of paid staff and does not accept funding from the city, county, state, or federal government. Founded by six local churches, the organization instead operates solely off donations and depends on its network of more than 180 volunteers to help serve its ever-increasing number of “clients.”

Open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., Resurrection House offers services that other organizations serving the homeless may not, including: locker storage, medical help, legal advice, clothing, clothes washing, transportation options, and counseling. They also offer shower and bathroom facilities, barber services, meals, and more. After completing an intake form, each new client immediately meets with a case manager to help kick-start the transition process.

At Plymouth Harbor, efforts to support Resurrection House come in many forms. Resident Bill Vernon has been a volunteer for nearly two years, ever since a friend at All Angels Episcopal Church suggested he get involved. Bill spends his Fridays from 8:00 a.m.—12:00 p.m. manning the shower facilities, where he keeps a list of which client is up next and rations supplies. “We only have four showers, but we could use 40,” Bill says. “All in all, Resurrection House helps people who are down on their luck — and there are loads of success stories.”

Resident Buzz VanArsdale has also volunteered at Resurrection House for several years. After noticing a volunteer advertisement in the newspaper, he decided to see what he could do to help. With a passion for bicycling, he was the perfect fit for the bicycle shop — where volunteers help refurbish used bicycles that are given to clients who land a full-time job. When asked why he enjoys his time there, Buzz says, “It’s important. This place meets a large need for a very big population in our community.” 

Resident Mike Kolker got involved with Resurrection House after a suggestion by Bill Vernon. He was there for over a year, trading off Friday volunteer days with Bill before he stopped due to physical challenges. However, he does plan to look into a more administrative position. “The organization is doing a very fine job, and it is obviously needed,” he says. “I would encourage others to consider the possibility of volunteering there.” 

In December 2015, Plymouth Harbor employees also launched “Holiday Helpers” through the OnBoard Employee Wellness Program, which collected donations for Resurrection House. A total of 10 boxes of clothing, blankets, toiletries, and over $300 in cash and gift cards was gathered. It was so successful that employees have begun a permanent collection bin, where donations can be made on a year-round basis.

To learn more about Resurrection House, you can visit http://www.resurrectionhousesarasota.org/.

 

By: Addie Hurst

Have you seen an attractive lady with a winning smile and a charming foreign accent? Then you have seen Gunilla Dorsen, a newcomer who is delighted to be a Plymouth Harbor resident.

Gunilla was born in Lidingö, Sweden, a community outside of Stockholm, which accounts for her charming accent. She was the youngest of four children; her father was a professor of industrial economics and management, a position which caused them to move to Bergen, Norway, where Gunilla started school. However, when the Germans invaded, they were able to escape to Sweden where Gunilla had to start school all over.

Gunilla finished her education in Sweden and took secretarial and business courses. After a stint working for her father, she worked for the Swedish Foreign Service in San Francisco and then as a press assistant in Washington, D.C., and in Copenhagen.

It was in Washington, D.C., where she met Dr. Robert Dorsen, who was working with the Johnson Administration on family planning. He was sent to India, and she was stationed in Copenhagen. But fate decreed they were not to be separated for long, and they were married in 1967 in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Dorsen worked for the Public Health Service for 26 years. Then they moved to Riverdale (NYC) where Dr. Dorsen worked for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and then went into private practice. During this time, he pursued his love of theater and worked in many theater productions and several movies including “Panic in the Streets” and “Tootsie.” Meanwhile, Gunilla attended the New York School of Design and subsequently helped refurbish a cruise ship.

They traveled extensively, going to Sweden annually to visit her parents. In 1979, they took a 43-day train trip from London to Hong Kong. Then the Dorsens retired and moved to Sarasota. Sadly, Dr. Dorsen died at the Smith Care Center in 2009. Gunilla was a volunteer for the Salvation Army and served on the board of Bay Plaza. When she is totally unpacked and has sold her condo, she wants to volunteer for the Fund Shop, to try Tai Chi and Yoga, and to participate in water aerobics and to play Mahjongg.

 

Nancy and Jerry Kaplan married after college. Nancy, while raising three children, worked as a professional artist, and at age 50, trained and then worked as a Registered Nurse. As a teenager, Jerry contracted Polio. Despite the lifelong effects, he started and operated a business for 15 years before working for 30 years as an elementary school teacher and principal. What led these two down their respective career paths?

 

View their August Insights presentation to find out:

Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoardInsights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to Phil Starr, each Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.

 

IMG_3797Greg and Don Fosselman have an inseparable bond. Numbers five and six, respectively, of seven children, the two live next door to each other here at Plymouth Harbor. Of their seven siblings, they had only one sister — the oldest. While Greg and Don seem to be the closest of their siblings, they led two very different lives after leaving their hometown of Waterloo, Iowa, years ago.

After finishing high school, Greg attended the University of Iowa. As he always had a keen interest in newsprint growing up, it came as no surprise that he decided to study journalism. After graduation, however, he joined the U.S. Army and was stationed in Germany from 1950 IMG_3802until 1952. While there, he handled logistics for field engineer units in Frankfurt, and later held an administrative position in Kaiserslautern. Soon after he returned to the United States, Greg was offered a position at United Press International (UPI), a leading newswire service. Greg was at UPI for over 15 years, serving as a newspaper and broadcast editor in Milwaukee and Madison, Wisconsin, and eventually Chicago. In 1968, he was offered a job at the Chicago Tribune as a headline writer and news editor, where he remained until he retired in 1989.

Don also joined the U.S. Army after he graduated from Iowa State Teachers College (now University of Northern Iowa). Like his older brother, he was stationed in Germany from 1953 until 1955. After Don returned to the United States, he accepted a teaching position in Montour, Iowa, for two years before he went on to attend Teacher’s College at Columbia University to earn his master’s degree. “I went to New York and never moved back,” Don says. He held teaching positions for several years in New York and Connecticut before he transitioned into a guidance counselor position, retiring in 1992. “I enjoyed my years as an educator,” he says. “But, as a guidance counselor, I felt that my day-to-day interactions were much more varied and meaningful.”

While Greg and Don lived states away from each other, their lives often overlapped. The two kept in touch as most siblings do and visited each other frequently. On occasion, even their professional lives overlapped, which is exemplified by the summer of 1958 when Don was working for a charity in New York City. The organization operated a barge called “The Floating Hospital,” which cruised around the New York Harbor, providing healthcare facilities and summer activities for underprivileged families.

The charity was in need of some publicity, so Don reached out to Greg, who was still at UPI at the time. Greg set to work on the story, sent it out over the wire, and it was picked up in no time by several media outlets in New York City. It received so much traction that the local outlets sent their reporters out to cover the story in person. Needless to say, the organization was quite impressed with Don Fosselman.

Don was the first to move to Sarasota. After retiring in Westchester County in New York, he spent his winters traveling to many different areas in Florida. A neighbor in New York owned a home on Longboat Key and ended up sharing the Longboat Observer with him. He answered an advertisement for a two-month Lido Key rental and the rest was history when he moved here in 2000. In 2011, he moved into Plymouth Harbor.

In contrast, Greg spent his winters on the West Coast, namely in California and Arizona, but a visit to Don convinced him to move to Plymouth Harbor in 2013. Today, the two are located on the fourteenth floor, with only a short walk down the hallway between them.

At Plymouth Harbor, the brothers enjoy dining together and exercising in the Wellness Center. Greg attends the Sit Fit class every Monday and Wednesday, while Don participates in Tap class on Wednesdays. Outside of Plymouth Harbor, Don spends his time volunteering as an usher at various venues around Sarasota. The Van Wezel, Sarasota Opera House, Historic Asolo Theater, Asolo Repertory Theatre, and the Players Theater are among the many places you might find him.

In addition to his appreciation for theater, Don has a passion for traveling. “I’ve been to almost every place I ever dreamed of going. I’ve never left Earth though,” he jokes. “Maybe if I were younger.” This year, Don went on a tour of the American National Parks, and in a few short weeks he’ll be on a Danube River Cruise through Europe. When Greg was asked about traveling, he laughed and said, “I’ve never been much of a traveler — I let Don do it for me.”

While the Fosselman brothers certainly have a  mix of fascinating interests, you’ll be sure to find these two enjoying dinner together almost every night in the Plymouth Harbor restaurant.

 

By: Celia Catlett

phillipsMarjorie and Bernard “Bernie” are a dynamic couple, and they parlayed their energy and intelligence into useful and interesting careers. Both born in New York City, they met at Cornell University when she was an undergraduate and he was working toward his doctorate in sociology.

Marjorie went on to get her master’s in education from Boston University. Hired at Middlesex Community College, she initiated a course to teach parents how to choose a preschool. The class went from eight to 35 students and then developed into a two-year Early Childhood Teachers’ Training Program. She founded a second similar program at the Minuteman Vocational Technical School in Lexington, Massachusetts. When asked to teach a trilingual first grade (French, Spanish, and English) in Lowell, she discovered that most of the pupils were Cambodian! After that adventure, she enjoyed teaching science from kindergarten to fourth grade for a number of years.

During this time, she was also busy with two sons, David who is now a professor of humanities at Wake Forest, and Michael who works in Atlanta’s City Planning Department using computer applications for geographic information systems. Looking back on it, Marjorie says that she wonders how she managed it all.

Bernie also has brought a creative force to his work in academia. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Colombia University, crossed the country to get his master’s from Washington State University (where he enjoyed riding a motorcycle through the rolling hills of the area) and then it was back to the East Coast to pursue his Ph.D. in sociology from Cornell University. He has taught at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the University of Illinois (Champaign/Urbana), and, for the greater part of his career, at Boston University. He has written a number of books, from textbooks like Social Research: Strategies and Tactics to a book entitled Worlds of the Future, which combined fiction and nonfiction.

He founded and directed the Sociological Imagination Group in 2000 and has just finished collaborating with three co-authors on Invisible Crisis: Toward an Interdisciplinary Scientific Method, a book that they will use for a textbook for their Academy for Individual Evolution (www.individualevolution.org). Its focus is on how each individual can evolve. Interaction versus isolation is the key concept in their approach.

But life has not been all work for the Phillips. They enjoy classical music and jazz, art and travel, the latter two well combined in some Japanese art in their apartment. In the seventeen years they were on Longboat Key, they became involved in the local arts culture. They are readers and film lovers, and, by the way, Bernie would like to find a ping-pong partner. As I said, they are a dynamic duo.

 

By: Lee Yousri

GaylordWhen I invited Dee Gaylord to my apartment for her “bio” interview, she immediately said, “Why don’t you come to mine and you can see my artwork?” That was my first clue: I was dealing with a genuine, gracious person—dedicated to her home and her art. Welcome, Dee.

Life for Dee started in Peoria, Illinois. It really started when she attended Bradley College there and met her husband-to-be. Welcome, Jim. In the early years of their marriage, Dee taught first grade and Jim was a real estate developer. In 1969, they moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, where Jim had purchased a Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise. It was a magical progression after that as Jim developed a chain of restaurants in Iowa, Illinois, and Nebraska. Dee took advantage of their domicile, a university town, by continuing her education. She took classes in art, clinical psychology, and gerontology, and received a post-graduate degree.

But Dee’s first and all-consuming love was painting. She dedicated considerable time to it, participating in many shows. Photos of her paintings were included in books on watercolor. Their first exposure to this area was at a meeting held in Sarasota where Jim was appointed as the Upper Midwest Franchise President. They stayed at The Colony on Longboat Key, now defunct, but at that time reputedly the top tennis resort in the country—and as tennis buffs, they enjoyed it so much they actually purchased a condo on this very first visit. It was a “had to rent” deal that permitted them to spend only one month yearly there. They sold it a few years later and purchased a condo that allowed them to stay as long as they chose. For 25 years, they were snowbirds. Dee had the pleasure of owning a gallery in downtown Sarasota and she studied with many great artists who came here to conduct workshops.

Upon retirement in 1995, Jim served on many boards and enjoyed being a lecturer at the University of Nebraska’s business school. He lectured on entrepreneurship, and in 1997, was selected by the university as Entrepreneur of the Year. While all this was going on, they raised three children: Tim, John, and Missy. This of course progressed into grandchildren—four to be exact. In 2008, the Gaylords bought a home in Lakewood Ranch and subsequently became Florida residents.

Through friends they heard about Plymouth Harbor and they find it ideal. They love their beautiful Tower apartment where they are surrounded by Dee’s art, and at the same time, Jim deals with his health issues as a resident of the Smith Care Center.

 

WellnessAmiAmi French has been a Yoga instructor with Plymouth Harbor for over six years. She teaches the all-level Yoga class on Monday mornings at 11:00 a.m. in the Wellness Center. Ami is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, where she studied fine arts. Although she practiced Yoga throughout college, Ami first went on to a career in advertising and graphic design after graduating. After several years and a move from Massachusetts to Florida, Ami found her true passion teaching Yoga — which eventually prompted her to travel to Tamil Nadu, India, eight years ago, where she studied Hatha and Sivananda Yoga techniques.

Today, Ami primarily teaches Yoga to older adults. In addition to Plymouth Harbor, Ami instructs at other local organizations, including having taught individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease at Sarasota’s Jewish Family & Children’s Services. Her work with this population inspired her to go back to school six years ago, first to become a Certified Nursing Assistant, and later, a Registered Nurse (RN). In July 2016, Ami received her license as an RN from the Florida Board of Nursing. She plans to continue her work in the wellness industry, teaching Yoga and using her knowledge as a nurse to help others.

One thing Ami enjoys most about Yoga is taking ancient techniques and applying them to everyday issues. She discusses the physical benefits, including flexibility, balance, and posture correction, in addition to benefits that come from meditation and breathing exercises, including increased lung capacity and circulation as well as cellular repair and improved memory.

“Although Yoga stems from Hindu roots, the American version is a revision of wellness with a mix of its original spiritual elements,” Ami says. “My interest is in using traditional Yoga techniques to help people improve their lifestyle, and prevent and slow disease processes.”

Ami describes her class here at Plymouth Harbor as a hybrid class — one that is open to people of all levels, where you can participate while seated or using a floor mat. If you’re interested in learning more, stop by Ami’s class on Monday mornings.

 

mural1If you’ve stopped by the Smith Care Center’s (SCC) Therapy room recently, you might have noticed a change of scenery. In July, the SCC Therapy team welcomed a new mural on one of its walls, depicting a colorful and inviting beach scene.

The mural is the work of self-taught artist Carol Roman, who is also the mother of Tony Roman in our Dining Services department. Carol is a talented local artist, having produced artwork for Bradenton Healthcare and Peach’s Restaurants, in addition to specializing in artwork for individual homes, pool areas, furniture, and more.

The mural illustrates a beautiful shoreline with fencing along the beach, an anchored boat, islands off in the distance, and palm trees seemingly extending into the therapy room. While at first glance it may seem mural2like your typical beach scene, you may want to take a closer look. Each member of the SCC Therapy team has a personalized item incorporated into the mural. And if you are lucky, they just may give you a clue behind the meaning.

This mural is only the start for the SCC Therapy team. In the coming weeks, they hope to add inspirational quotes to the room’s remaining walls. With no
windows to the outside, the team felt this was the perfect way to incorporate the unique location and atmosphere of Plymouth Harbor. After stopping multiple visitors in their tracks and receiving several comments from residents, it seems they were right. If you are interested in viewing the new mural, simply stop by the SCC Therapy office and take a look.

 

By: Isabel Pedersen

NimickGeorge “Gus” Nimick is one of five Pittsburgh brothers who, each in his turn, marched off to study at Princeton University. His father had gone there, too.

It is no surprise that Gus, when they moved to Sarasota 30 years ago, looked for the Princeton Club. And, for 30 years, he has been the glue which kept that club alive: doing the boring stuff; maintaining lists, collecting dues, sending out notices, and making sure that someone besides Gus Nimick would be president. He did serve as president of the Ivy League Club but not “his” club.

Meanwhile, Deborah “Debbe” was cutting her own swath. Her presidency of the Child Protection Center and her private practice as the “teacher of last resort” for trouble
d and learning disabled children are the latest manifestations of a lifetime commitment to children. Her first child-centered job came at eleven, teaching swimming.

After finishing her classics major at Brown University, she added a master’s degree in Educational Psychology. Debbe started two pre-schools, in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, and in Houston, as they moved back and forth. Then she added some more courses in Houston and spent several years as a psychologist in the Houston schools. While in Pittsburgh, she had developed a fifth-grade curriculum for the gifted, all of this while raising three children.

The Nimick’s 59-year-old marriage involved moving from Gus’ native Pittsburgh where,  as a chemical engineer, he worked on product quality at Gulf Oil to managing Information Technology for Gulf’s trading branch in Houston. Then Pittsburgh, then Houston again. Gus’ early adoption of the computer to industry’s uses made him early in the IT work. He also served as Secretary to the Industry Advisory Board to the International Energy Agency.

Now, after studying economics at the University of South Florida and being elected to their honorary society, he does a bit of work as a Certified Financial Planner and tax preparer.

Between tap dancing classes, painting (which has become Debbe’s passion), Gus’ club work, their three children, three grandchildren, and their other volunteer activities, let us hope they can find time to relax here, just a bit, so we can enjoy this energetic pair.