My parents Elsa and Donald Price moved to Sarasota in the mid-70s after looking for a warm climate in which to retire. They settled on Lido Shores in an old Florida style home. After many visits, I myself relocated to Sarasota in 1984. A few years later, my father called me to say they were ready to move to a community that had all the amenities as they aged and had put a deposit down in a place called Plymouth Harbor.

I was shocked, but my father assured me he was doing what he thought best—he did not want to be a burden to us. I did some research and found that Plymouth Harbor was truly a hidden gem. They waited 5 years for their apartment, and then spent the next 3-4 years traveling on their boat Priceless and at Plymouth Harbor. My father quickly immersed himself in Plymouth Harbor daily life. He was the first resident trustee on the board in 1997-98, which paved the way for future resident trustees. My mom’s 25 years now at Plymouth Harbor have been incredibly satisfying and busy!

I was traveling the world for work, but after a career change in 1998, I was able to spend my entire time in Sarasota. I am very fortunate to be in financial services with my wife, Leslie Juron, guiding families to achieve lifelong success. Leslie and I spend many hours giving back to the community and thoroughly enjoy our clients who are either about to, or have retired. Our experience in this community has helped us understand how to age with a better quality of life. It has also helped us teach our clients and families how to achieve better family dynamics and communication. When children or spouses are not the caregivers, relationships with family have better outcomes.

Having been on the Plymouth Harbor Foundation board for a number of years, I now serve as the chair. I
have also served on numerous Sarasota nonprofit organizations in the past. I feel fortunate to have been able to get to know many of the residents and staff throughout my visits to Plymouth Harbor and through serving on the Foundation board. The Foundation supports positive aging by adding new and exciting opportunities for residents and employees. Some examples include employee scholarships, leadership development, and programming or capital support to improve life at Plymouth Harbor. In the past few years we have upgraded Pilgrim Hall, the Wellness Center, and the Memory Care program. We have clients in many other similar communities, but none that I have seen are as dynamic and forward thinking as Plymouth Harbor.

We are excited to begin 2019 with many initiatives that will make Plymouth Harbor an even better place.
We look forward to communicating those to you as they develop–always with resident input. While we will
greatly miss Becky Pazkowski, she has left us with a great legacy and in good hands with a very capable board.

I am also excited that we have added four new trustees who will be a huge asset with their past experiences. I hope everyone gets to meet them in the very near term. I appreciate the opportunity to serve the Plymouth Harbor Foundation for the next few years and look forward to continuing to meet all the residents coming to our gem on the West Coast.

Introducing yoga classes in our Starr Memory Care Residence

It is commonly known that exercise is important for everyone. Physical activity, whether it is
walking, working out at the gym, or any other type of movement you enjoy, can improve your
self-esteem, mood, and physical health. Maintaining a good level of fitness is key to healthy aging,
and it becomes even more important for those with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Incorporating regular
movement into our residents’ days is important to help maintain strength, flexibility, and a level of
independence. To help with this, we have begun a yoga program to keep our residents moving.

Through our partnership with Sarasota Memorial Health Fit, we now offer 30-minute yoga classes
for our residents in the Starr Memory Care Residence and Seaside Assisted Living Residences. Every
Saturday morning, yoga instructor Nancy Zampella holds classes in both the Ringling and Lido
neighborhoods of our Starr Memory Care Residence.

Nancy has been practicing yoga since 1991 and is now the owner of her own studio, Yoga Libre.
She was a student of yoga for 10 years before she decided to pursue a career as a yoga teacher.
The training program was a transformative experience for Nancy that helped her heal her own
carpal tunnel by improving her shoulder alignment. She completed the course with a feeling of
empowerment and a new mission to show others they don’t have to live in pain.

On Saturday mornings, Nancy teaches chair yoga to residents in the Starr Memory Care Residence.
Chair yoga is a gentle, non-traditional form of yoga that reduces strain on the limbs and joints.
“A lot of people don’t know that you can do yoga while sitting in a chair, but it is a lot of fun,”
Nancy said. “This class has been an opportunity for me to try new ways of teaching, which has
been a wonderful surprise.” Whether in a chair or on a mat, yoga is all about moving your energy
throughout your body. As a teacher of yoga, Nancy’s goal is to help people open up their bodies and
feel better, mentally and physically. The class focuses on simple, rhythmic movements to increase
circulation and develop muscle memory.

Yoga is not only an exercise for the body. It also works the mind and helps reduce stress and improve
mood. Alzheimer’s can be disorienting, and yoga’s emphasis on connection with your body, mind,
and breath helps people reconnect with themselves and their world. The group setting of the class
provides residents with an experience they can share in together, and friends and family of residents are encouraged to attend the classes as well. “Both caretakers and residents can benefit from a yoga class, and doing it together can be a meaningful experience,” Nancy said. “The more the merrier!”

Almost 7 years. Can you believe it? It has gone so fast, and together we have done so much. As I think back, you might first be drawn to the gifts you have given in the monetary form…over $10,000,000 in fact! But in reality, you have given me so many gifts much more lasting than monetary or tangible gifts. You have me given personal gifts that truly have made me a better person.

The gift of friendship.
My first task here, since I knew literally NO ONE, was to get to know you all. I had no idea who you were, what was important to you, and, well, vice versa. But when I called, you all (almost all) said yes when I asked if I could come and visit with you. You were warm and shared about your life with me. As a result, we became friends. Over the years, you shared more, I shared more, and our friendships deepened. I am profoundly proud to say that you are my friends.

The gift of honesty.
I said earlier that “most” of you said yes when I called to ask for a visit. I recall one resident who said no. He did not have any interest in the foundation or in giving to the foundation. He was honest, not mean, but honest. I thanked him and said I would still like to meet him and get to know him. He agreed, and one-and-a-half hours later, we each had a new friend. I knew that he was not interested in supporting the foundation, and I knew why, and we didn’t have to avoid each other at all. The gift of honesty is so important, because without honesty, you can never have trust.

The gift of trust.
People have asked me what I feel is the most important ingredient in fundraising. Without a doubt, it is trust. How could you ever expect someone to make a gift if they didn’t trust that the gift would be applied correctly, thanked correctly, and recorded correctly? Trust gives us all courage, commitment, and integrity. You have trusted me, and for that I am most grateful, because it makes me want to be a better person.

The gift of forgiveness.
No one is perfect, and I fully admit that I am far from it. I have made mistakes for which I am truly sorry. There are several examples I can think of, but one jumps to the top in my memory. A couple here had shared something about support for a project that I misunderstood. I was embarrassed and very sorry for having misinterpreted their intentions. I asked to meet with them and apologized for my mistake. They could have been angry and standoffish, but they were remarkably forgiving. It takes a strong person to forgive. I learned from that experience that forgiveness is a great gift to share. The world would be a better place if we all learned forgiveness.

The gift of generosity.
It takes a village to make things happen. Perhaps it is because of the way Plymouth Harbor was designed in colonies, but residents here are generous of their time, their wisdom, and their assets. The projects that the Foundation has been successful in supporting have come from the time and wisdom of residents, who think through the possibilities and ramifications of a project, and if feasible, end up generously supporting with their own assets. Friends and neighbors follow, and the result is something wonderful…a new wellness center, performance venue, educational scholarships, or a premier memory care program. Your generosity is overwhelming, and it makes Plymouth Harbor a better place.

The gift of compassion.
It is no secret that our residents here have experienced substantial financial success throughout their lives. It is also safe to say that most of our staff have modest means, and some struggle to pay the bills. Some have lost their homes or possessions to fire or hurricane. Some have lost their loved ones. Whatever the case, Plymouth Harbor leads with heart and comes to the rescue of those less fortunate or who are experiencing a catastrophic event. Two of our staff lost their homes to fire, and residents pooled their funds and helped to get each family back on their feet. Hurricane Irma left us all temporarily homeless for a short period of time. Residents and staff came together in nothing short of a miracle and survived 48 hours of anxiety, not knowing what the storm would leave behind. Everyone pulled together with a show of courage and compassion. I learned that together we can survive most anything if we allow compassion to be our guide.

The gift of empathy.
A lot can happen in 7 years. Our two sons have graduated from college (one is in graduate school), met the loves of their lives, are gainfully employed, and one has produced a beautiful grand-daughter for us. Alas, Paul and I have decided to return to our roots, Michigan, where our family grows. Given all that I have said earlier, you could be angry and claim that we are not being true to our Sarasota and Plymouth Harbor home. But, you haven’t. Many of you have taken a moment to talk to me and/or Paul and have expressed your well-wishes for us, understanding that family is important. For the empathy that you so graciously show us, we are ever so thankful.

Whomever replaces me will have new ideas and energy to make Plymouth Harbor better, stronger, and more fun! I know you will all help them get started, like you did me, building friendships, honesty, trust; forgiving shortcomings or unintended mistakes; and showing your generosity, compassion, and empathy for the gifts they have to share.

We will miss you, and we will visit. Sarasota has become our home away from home, truly.
Thank you.

-Becky Pazkowski

Sarasota is in the midst of a great reimagining of our bayfront, and Plymouth Harbor resident Karl Newkirk has taken on an important role in the future of our community as a member of the Van Wezel Foundation’s strategy committee.

After moving to Sarasota upon retirement, a friend invited him to join the Van Wezel Foundation board of directors in 2007. “As I got to understand Sarasota, I realized that the Van Wezel is one of the city’s special things,” Karl said.

The Van Wezel is an iconic piece of Sarasota, but at 50 years old, the building’s infrastructure has started to show its age. Karl and the Van Wezel Foundation Board evaluated whether the purple performance hall would be able to meet the future needs of the Sarasota community, and sadly the answer was no. Icon or not, the Van Wezel would need to be replaced with a new performing arts hall for Sarasota to continue its role as the art and cultural center of the west coast. “For the good of Sarasota, it needed to be done,” Karl said.

Around the same time, a dialogue about the future of the bayfront was beginning among community leaders. Enter the Sarasota Bayfront 20:20 initiative.

Started by local restaurant owner Michael Klauber, Sarasota Bayfront 20:20 is a group of local community organizations who “support the creation of a long-term master plan for the Sarasota bayfront area that will establish a cultural and economic legacy for the region while ensuring open, public access to the bayfront.” According to the initiative’s website, “more than 55 arts, neighborhood, foundation, and business groups have had their boards unanimously vote to support a common vision statement.” Thanks to Karl, Plymouth Harbor was one of them.

With so much support from the community, Sarasota Bayfront 20:20 caught the attention of the City Commissioners, who agreed to creating the Sarasota Bayfront Planning Organization (SBPO). Karl, as a member of the Van Wezel Foundation’s strategy committee, worked closely with SBPO as they studied the area and developed a plan to best utilize the 53 acres. Fortunately, these acres reside in a trust that prohibits large-scale commercial development.The plan, which the City Commission approved last September, places a new performing arts hall at the hub of the design, along with walking trails, boat docks, and shops and restaurants. The beloved current Van Wezel will remain open and operating during the years it will take to fundraise, design, and build the new performing arts hall. Then, the City will decide how to re-purpose the old building. The goal is to create an accessible, walkable facility that has something for everyone, no matter their age or status. With three large pedestrian ramps crossing U.S. Highway 41, people will be able to traverse the area by foot or by bike without worrying about motor vehicle traffic.

“I love being able to be a part of something that will solidify Sarasota’s premier status today as a cultural center,” Karl said. “It is important we continue educating our community and exposing our children to the arts.”

This is a massive project, one that has been met with its fair share of pushback, but “it is important that future generations have the ability to experience what we have gotten to,” Karl said. “I want to see it through.”

Rudyard Kipling was a successful writer, leaving a sizable estate upon his death. A newspaper reporter came up to him once and said, ”Mr. Kipling, I read somebody calculated that the money you make from your writings amounts to over $100 a word.” Mr. Kipling raised his eyebrows and said, ”I certainly wasn’t aware of that.” The reporter cynically reached into his pocket, pulled out a $100 bill, gave it to Kipling and said, ”Here’s a $100 bill. Now you give me one of your $100 words.” Kipling looked at the $100 bill, took it, put it in his pocket, and said ”Thanks.” The word ”thanks” was certainly a $100 word then, and it is more like a million dollar word now, one that is too seldom heard, too rarely spoken, and too often forgotten.

When I was growing up, children were expected to write thank you notes for every gift. From the time I learned to write, “thank you” became a staple in my vocabulary. Sometimes notes were written for gifts I found to be wonderful, and sometimes they were written tongue-in-cheek for gifts under-appreciated, such as handkerchiefs! It was in my adult years that I came to understand the distinction between “thanks” and “gratitude.” Up into my early forties, I believed I had worked my way through college – with jobs on the Cape over summers and holidays along with four jobs in college. Based on the amount I worked, my truth was that “I worked my way through college” because my parents were unable to help with college expenses. I had my comeuppance the day I remembered my two aunts who provided funding for me each year, my father’s best friend who gave me a check toward tuition every semester, and the two scholarships over four years from the Federated Church of Orleans and the Eastern Star. Adding all those up, I realized that my earnings were meager in comparison! It was only when I remembered the generous persons in my life that I understood the meaning of gratitude, and I hold those faces close in my heart.

In the Harry Potter novels, there are characters called dementors – dark spirits – that come into a room and suck every bit of life, enthusiasm and hope out of all present. While the good news is that chocolate is the antidote, the dementors’ presence drags everyone down. Over the years, I’ve come to understand that there are a few dementors everywhere, those who seem ungrateful and angry with life and leave us sucked dry of enthusiasm and hope. While I suppose we should always carry a little chocolate, just in case, dementors remind us that gratitude is a much healthier quality to embody.

An article in Psychology Today listed some characteristics of grateful people, including (1) they feel a sense of abundance in their lives, (2) they appreciate the contributions of others to their well-being, (3) they recognize and enjoy life’s small pleasures and (4) they acknowledge the importance of experiencing and expressing gratitude.

As Thanksgiving grows near, gratitude is brought to the forefront of our minds. This season, let us all fill our hearts with gratitude for all the wonders, both big and small, that this life brings us.

-Chaplain Sparrow

On November 11, 1919, the first observance of Veterans Day, President Woodrow Wilson expressed the following sentiment: “To us in America the reflections of Armistice Day (Veterans Day) will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service, and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of nations.”

In 1926, Congress called for the annual observance of Veterans Day, and in 1938, the day was made a legal holiday. From that day forward, November 11 has been a day to honor all the brave men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces and to thank them for their dedication to our nation.

According to the most recent census, there are 18.5 million veterans in the U.S., at least 38 of whom live at Plymouth Harbor and 4 of whom are board members. Here are three of their stories:

After graduating from Vassar College in 1944, resident Sallie VanArsdale joined the women’s division of the United States Navy as part of W.A.V.E.S.: Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service. After nine weeks of officer training followed by eight weeks of supply corps training, she was stationed at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. For 22 months during World War II, Sallie ordered supplies that were needed to build and repair naval ships docked at the port. “It was an entirely different life than I had ever lived before,” Sallie said. “Seeing the whole place in operation and being a part of it all was very exciting. The whole country was totally unified.”

Colonel Jamo C. Powell, another resident, was commissioned a Second Lieutenant of Field Artillery from Texas A&M University in May 1958 and went on to serve 30 years of active duty. His military career was extensive: He served as a Major during the Vietnam War; commanded the 2nd Battalion, 6th Artillery Regiment in Gelnhausen, Germany; and served as a staff officer at the Pentagon in the Department of the Army. His final assignment before retirement was Deputy Chief of Staff and Personnel for the 2nd United States Army in Atlanta, Georgia.

Colonel Dale Woodling, Plymouth Harbor board member, was a judge advocate general and served in the United States Army for 28 years. He and his wife, who was a nurse, both expected to only serve for one assignment, but it turned into a career. Woodling has dealt with all types of legal matters, ranging from courts-martial to environmental law, and ended his career as Commander of the U.S. Army Claims Service.

Thank you to all of our Plymouth Harbor veterans:
Asterisks denote our board members.

Air Force
Terry Aldrich
H. Graham Barkhuff
Thomas H. Belcher
Lawrence E. Coffey
Irwin Eisenfeld
Duncan Finlay*
Leon Gainsboro
Allen Jennings
Jack Kidd
Don MacLean
Jay Price*
Arthur Sandler

Army
Martin Abrahams
Al Balaban
Robert Barkley
Bill Brackett
Tom Bulthuis
Richard P. Carroll
Richard Cooley
John Cranor III*
Jack Denison
Tom Elliott
Jerry Hamovit
Gregory Hetter
Bill Johnston
Sidney Katz
Tom Luebbe
Francis O’Brien
Jamo C. Powell
Tom Towler
Clifford Tuttle
Dale Woodling*

Coast Guard
Carl P. Denney

Marine Corps
David A. Beliles
Harold Dombrowski
Ky Thompson
Douglas West

Navy
Jim Ahstrom
Medora Dashiell
Arthur Davidson
Tom Goddard
James J. Griffith
Donald Hackel
Richard J. March
William A. Stanford
Jim Stern
Sallie VanArsdale
John Williams

We did our best to identify all Plymouth Harbor veterans. We know it is possible that some were missed, and we apologize for any who were missed.

The courtyards in the Northwest Garden were designed specifically as a welcoming and social area for each neighborhood. The courtyards provide an opportunity for a safe, secure outdoor experience for residents and their family members. Whether a sunny stroll, a social visit, or just to sit and reflect next to the water features, the courtyard gardens provide a wonderful outdoor experience.

The Seaside Courtyard is open to all, and is accessed from the Bridge (pathway from the Lobby to the entrance of the Starr Memory Care Residence). The water feature is a main focal point in the courtyard, with the soothing sounds of water splashing down the tiles, and is surrounded by beautiful plantings and pavers. The seating areas offer conversation spaces under the large four-canopy umbrella. Elegant lighting along the pathways and the seating areas makes way for pleasant visits during the day or night. Other special features include kinetic art that swirls with the wind, and musical instruments that makes beautiful tones when tinged. Going into the busy season and the cooler temperatures, we will see more and more people taking advantage of this beautiful courtyard garden, which was supported by Barry and Phil Starr during our “A Commitment to Memory” capital campaign.

The Lido and Ringling Memory Care neighborhoods each offer their own private courtyards with similar features, including beautifully lush plantings and pavers. The Lido Courtyard, supported by Carol and Morton Siegler, offers a beautiful tiled water feature, the Harp musical instrument, and two kinetic art pieces. The Ringling Courtyard, supported by a gift from the estate of Joan Runge, features a water cauldron with soothing sounds, the Griffin musical instrument, and two ‘Desert Flower’ kinetic art pieces that twirl in the breeze. Both courtyards have teak tables and chairs that are nicely positioned under the canopy umbrella for daytime use, and soft lighting suggests a cozy area for nighttime relaxation. Many life enrichment activities take place in the courtyards.

Future plans for the Lido and Ringling Courtyards include raised gardens for resident participation and soft piped-in music. We look forward to hosting more life enrichment activities and events in the cooler weather this fall and winter.

On Friday, December 16th, Plymouth Harbor held a surprise celebration for the retirement of our longest-serving employee, housekeeper Lanette Davis. She spent her last day at Plymouth Harbor on December 30, 2016, after more than 42 years of service.

In December 1973, at 22 years old, Lanette filled out an application for a housekeeping position at the suggestion of a friend. One interview was all it took and she was on the floor the next day. Lanette credits her length of service to an outstanding work environment and exceptional leadership. Most of all, however, she credits the sense of family she feels with both her co-workers and the residents she has cared for over the years.

Residents and employees alike gathered on the Mezzanine to celebrate Lanette, honoring her decades of service with laughs, cake, memory books filled with photos, a special plaque recognizing her dedication to Plymouth Harbor, and, of course, her favorite flowers (yellow roses). Special guests in attendance included Lanette’s son and husband.

“In this type of environment, it’s not often that you see this kind of cross-culture with residents and staff,” resident Dr. Paul Groen remarked. Residents and coworkers went on to share stories of their years spent with Lanette, consistently noting her unwavering positive attitude, work ethic, and contagious smile. “In my 13 years, she’s never not had a smile on her face,” says resident Ish Pedersen with a smile. “She will be missed.”

We are pleased to bring two lifelong learning courses to Plymouth Harbor in 2015, led by instructors from the Lifelong Learning Academy in Sarasota.  These offerings are supported in part through gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation

EisenhowerSecret Illnesses of U.S. Presidents and their Effect on World History and Politics  

Thursdays 4:00-5:30 p.m. (3 sessions) January 29, February 5, 12 in the Club Room

Was the course of world history during the twentieth century altered as a result of the secret and unknown illnesses of U.S. presidents?  Until recently, presidential illnesses were often kept hidden from press and public. Most have since been revealed, but how at the time did they affect the sufferers’ interaction with world leaders and their management of crises? Did FDR’s hypertension influence the conduct of WWII and his critical negotiations with Stalin at Yalta? What about the impact on the Cold War of Eisenhower’s hypertension and heart attack and JFK’s back surgery and Addison’s disease? In this course, blending history and medicine, we’ll explore these and other intriguing questions.   Course Fee:  $15 per registrant

Course leader:  Allan B. Schwartz, M.D. 

Professor of medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, specializing in nephrology and hypertension. He has served as vice chair of the department as well as clinical service chief, academic service chief, recipient of many “outstanding clinician” and “outstanding teacher” awards.  He has conducted numerous regional and national CME seminars. His publications include two textbooks and many chapters, national and international meeting presentations, abstracts, and articles. He is a peer reviewer for numerous medical journals. Dr. Schwartz received his M.D. degree from Hahneman Medical College (later Drexel University College of Medicine).

 

history medicineThe Epic of Medicine

Thursdays 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. (6 sessions) March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 9, 16 in the Club Room

This course traces the history of medicine as it relates to the history of mankind from pre-historic time to the 20th century. The emphasis will be on Western medicine, but influences from Eastern traditions will be included. A fervent attempt will be made to learn from history so we will not be destined to repeat it. Parallels will be drawn throughout the course to “modern medicine” as well as “alternative medicine.” Come to learn about the origins of “scientific” medicine, folk remedies, the role of religion in medicine, and so much more. This will be a PowerPoint presentation augmented by videotapes from the Teaching Company.  Course Fee:  $30 per registrant

Course leader:  Al Tripodi, M.D.

Dr. Tripodi has a B.A. from Cornell and an M.D. from SUNY Upstate Medical University, where he was an associate clinical professor of medicine. He is certified in internal medicine and geriatrics and practiced in Syracuse, N.Y. and Sarasota for forty years.  He has been responsible for teaching medical students and residents and was medical director of two extended-care facilities in Syracuse. He presently volunteers and is medical director of the Senior Friendship Center’s medical clinic in Sarasota. He has an abiding interest in history and a fervent belief that “to know history may prevent us from repeating it.”

Finlay_5x7 300 dpiThe Board of Trustees of Plymouth Harbor, Inc. welcomed three new members and elected new leadership for 2015.

The newly elected Chair of the Board of Trustees is G. Duncan Finlay, MD who is also currently serving as President and CEO of the Florence A. Rothman Institute and Chief Medical Officer of Alive Sciences, LLC.  During his previous tenure as Chief Medical Officer and President and CEO of Sarasota Memorial Hospital, the system was named one of America’s Best Hospitals by US News and World Report in seven medical specialties.

Harry Hobson, CEO of Plymouth Harbor said, “Dr. Finlay has served as a Trustee for the past three years.  He brings leadership, experience, vision, and a passion that is consistent with Plymouth Harbor’s mission.”

After four years as Chairperson during which he guided Plymouth Harbor through a significant growth initiative that culminated in the grand opening of new Wellness Center, F. Thomas Hopkins will now serve as Immediate Past Chair.

“Tom has always been present for important governance discussions and decision,” says Hobson, “I can’t imagine a more dedicated person than Tom Hopkins.  While we will miss him as Chair, we will cherish this coming year knowing he is in the Board Room with us.”

Sarah Pappas-portrait_4x5Three current Trustees have also been elected to serve as officers of the Board. Sarah H. Pappas, EdD, has been elected to the position of Vice Chair. Dr. Pappas is President of the William G.  and Marie Selby Foundation and former President of Manatee Community College (now State College of Florida).

Cindy Malkin, recently Board Chair at the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation, also a member of the Women’s Resource Board, will serve as Secretary.

Brian D. Hall, Executive Vice President and Director of Wealth Management at the Gateway Bank of Southwest Florida, will serve as Treasurer.

Cindy-Malkin

Brian-D--Hall

In addition to the officers, Plymouth Harbor is pleased to welcome three new trustees to the board:

CranorJohn M. Cranor, III, former President and CEO for the New College Foundation, has over 30 years of management experience in the food service and retail industries including senior executive positions with Pepsi-Cola North America, Taco Bell Corporation, Wilson Sporting Goods, and Frito-Lay Company. He currently serves as the non-executive Chair of the Board of Directors of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc.

PattersonNora Patterson, a Sarasota County Commissioner, was first elected to the Sarasota City Commission in 1991, and served until 1998 when she was elected to the Sarasota County Commission.  Prior to this she served as the Mayor of Sarasota from 1994-95 and was appointed by the Governor to serve two years on Florida’s Legislative Committee on Intergovernmental Relations from 1996-98.

Woeltjen lo resWilliam Woeltjen has served as the Chief Financial Officer of Sarasota Memorial Health Care System since 2010, where he is responsible for all financial matters related to the health care system, including financial reporting, financial planning, revenue cycle, reimbursement, debt management, and managed care contracting. He has more than 25 years of experience in corporate health care finance.