A. Rothman Institute, where he serves as President and CEO, and The Rothman Index. 

According to Dr. Finlay, healthcare in the United States is beset by upward spiraling and financially unsustainable costs and quality that is disappointing at best. He says, “These pressures have led to a broad conclusion by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the industry as a whole, that the system must change from the current fee-for-service payment model to a ‘value-based’ reimbursement model.”
 
Early efforts to address this issue have had inconsistent results in terms of both quality and cost measurements. Common to these approaches, and any others likely to be proposed, is that they are patient-centered and thus require a means to accurately measure and follow a patient’s overall condition at any level of care, from the acute care hospital through skilled nursing, home health care, and assisted and independent living organizations.
 
The Rothman Index
The Rothman Index is an acuity metric developed at Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The Index uses data empirically, associated with severity of illness, and automatically computed, using data routinely entered in the electronic medical record — including nursing assessments, Braden Scale score, cardiac rhythm, vital signs, blood oxygen level, and lab test results.
 
The Rothman Index has been validated with over 30 peer-reviewed articles and is used in over 60 hospitals nationwide, including Methodist Houston, the Yale New Haven Health System, and the University of Florida Hospitals. Preliminary studies in skilled nursing facilities appear to support its accuracy outside the hospital.

Plymouth Harbor’s Involvement
It has been speculated that a functionally equivalent index of acuity can be constructed for those persons living independently. Therefore, the Florence A. Rothman Institute is exploring a trial study whereby patients conduct their own medical self-assessments by answering a series of questions.

In April 2017, Dr. Finlay formally invited our independent living residents to participate in the study, working collaboratively with The Rothman Index and Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The study officially began on May 9, 2017, with 43 Plymouth Harbor participants.
 
About the Study
The study consists of 43 independent living volunteers who will answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to 14 questions about possible symptoms pertaining to their own body systems. Then, the same volunteers will have a Registered Nurse independently perform a “standard” head-to-toe nursing assessment for comparison. This assessment will be repeated on a second occasion separated by more than 24 hours.

This study is funded by the Florence A. Rothman Institute (www.farinstitute.org) under the auspices of the Institutional Review Board of Sarasota Memorial Healthcare System.

We hope to have results to share from this study in the coming weeks.

In recent months, Plymouth Harbor engaged in a competitive graduate student project with architectural students from the University of Florida’s CityLab-Sarasota campus. We worked with six students enrolled in a master’s seminar under the instruction of adjunct professor and celebrated local architect, Guy Peterson.

Through this partnership, the major project for the seminar was decided to be the porte cochère on the ground level entrance of our new Northwest Garden Building. As the main point of entry to the new building, the porte cochère’s design served as an important, hands-on project for the students. The students worked in pairs, forming three teams. From there, each team was given a period of three months to outline their design and a stipend of $1,000 for any materials needed for their involvement in the project.

Guy Peterson, George McGonagill (Plymouth Harbor’s Vice President of Facilities), and Lorraine Enwright (THW Architects), worked with the students to identify the scope of the project, budget, structural parameters, and a materials list that was consistent with that of the building. Becky Pazkowski (Plymouth Harbor’s Senior Vice President of Philanthropy) served as Program Advisor, while George served in the role of Construction Advisor.

At the completion of the project, students were asked to present their designs for consideration for a first, second, or third prize. The first place pair received a $5,000 prize, second received $3,000, and third received $1,000, each to be split between the two team members. The first place award was supported by residents Marie and Tom Belcher, and the second and third place awards were supported by resident Charles Gehrie.

On Friday, May 5, the students presented their respective projects to Plymouth Harbor’s selection committee, and were called back to Plymouth Harbor on Monday, May 8, for the award announcements.

Each design was impressive, and one stood out among the rest. Offering a sophisticated, modern design, the first place winner met the requirements for the scope of the project above all others (rendering pictured on page 1. Please note: this is only a rendering, not an actual depiction of the final product). In the coming months, we will incorporate much of this design into the final plans for the Northwest Garden.

Plymouth Harbor was proud to collaborate with these talented students, four of whom are now graduates with their Master of Architecture degrees.

Below are the student teams, by prize:

1st Prize: Gabriella Ebbesson & Miranda Crowe
2nd Prize: Elena Nonino & Olivia Ellsworth
3rd Prize: Brittany Perez & Francia Salazar

 
 

Resident Sue Johnson discusses growing up in Brooklyn, becoming one of the first female superintendents in the country, and her marriage to a “Georgia Boy.”

View her May 2017 Insights presentation here:
 

 

On Monday, April 3rd, the Residents Association Executive Council held its annual meeting in Pilgrim Hall. Over 200 residents attended the meeting, which covered a number of pertinent issues.

Most notably, the association voted to change their by-laws so that the fiscal year of the Residents Association now aligns with the calendar year of the Plymouth Harbor Corporation — operating from January to January, rather than April to April as done since its founding. The Executive Council and Board of Directors reviewed this proposed resolution and unanimously voted to approve it.

Residents were also given a copy of the resolution in early March. To accomplish this transition, all currently serving officers, directors, and committee chairs will extend their terms for the interim period, which will last until the 2018 annual meeting on January 8, 2018.

Other important items discussed include Rev. Dick Sparrow accepting the position as our permanent Chaplain, rather than interim; a resident portal, accessible by computer, will be available later this year; and a new resource has been added to the library, which provides an inside look into the inner workings of each resident committee.

At the end of the meeting, Dr. Duncan Finlay, Chair of the Plymouth Harbor, Inc. Board of Trustees, spoke to the range of expertise and the enthusiasm that the trustees bring to the oversight of the plans and activities of Plymouth Harbor. Congratulations to all on another successful year for the Residents Association!

 
 

By: Becky Pazkowski

A Commitment to Memory campaign is in full swing, with current gifts exceeding $2,345,000! The Campaign Committee is reaching out to neighbors and friends to ask for participation in the campaign. Our goal is to reach the $3 million by November 1st, when we cut the ribbon for the Grand Opening.

The campaign support will give us the opportunity to build a premier program in Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming, unlike no other in our region. Specifically, $2 million will go into an income-generating Designated Investment Fund, from which we will draw off 5 percent (or $100,000) annually to specifically support the Educational Leadership ($40,000) and Inspirational Programming ($60,000). The balance of $1 million will support the capital resources needed to deliver these programs.

We hope you will all be interested in learning more about how you could be part of this campaign. We are able to take pledges payable over a five-year period and there are naming opportunities for you to consider, should that be of interest. If you have questions or would like to know more, please contact one of the Campaign Committee members or me (Becky Pazkowski) at Ext. 398.

Campaign Committee: Honorary Chairs: Gerry and (the late) Walt Mattson; Campaign Co-Chairs: Barry and Phil Starr; Committee Members: Marie and Tom Belcher, Joan Sheil and Bruce Crawford, Jack Denison, Charles Gehrie, Jean Glasser, Harry Hobson, Jeanne Manser, Ann and Ray Neff, Cade Sibley, Nancy Lyon and Tom Towler; Staff: Joe Devore, Becky Pazkowski.

 

By: Chris Cooper, Wellness Director

We have all heard the benefits of exercise either from our doctors or in literature. Usually it is in reference to aerobic exercise, such as walking or biking, because of its cardiovascular-enhancing benefit as well as its ability to decrease risk for disease and increase weight loss. It is the go-to prescription for health enhancement at any age.

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society concluded that weekly resistance training sessions not only resulted in strength gains but also significant improvements in cognitive function in older adults who presented with mild cognitive impairment. 1

Simply put, resistance-training exercises are proving to be a powerful tool for enhancing brain function as well as resulting in stronger bones and muscles.

This is not the first study to show the cognitive benefits of exercise. However, this particular study differs in that the researchers set out to determine if the cognitive improvements were a result of enhanced cardiovascular capacity or enhanced muscular strength. Participants performed 2-3 strength training sessions per week along with aerobic exercise and were regularly tested on cognitive ability. At the end of the study, only the persons with enhanced strength gains were associated with improvements in cognition. This illustrates that maintaining/improving muscle strength contributes to brain health as well.

If you are interested in reading this complete study and learning the mechanisms for these gains, please see the reference below:

1) Mavros Y, Gates N, Wilson GC, et al. Mediation of Cognitive Function Improvements by Strength Gains After Resistance Training in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Outcomes of the Study of Mental and Resistance Training. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2016.

 

By: Sallie VanArsdale

Prominent among the common interests of new residents Laurie and Tom Goddard is the desire to live next to water. Possibly, this began in their childhoods. Laurie grew up in Weymouth, Massachusetts, near Massachusetts Bay. Tom did the same in Brooklyn, New York, where the southern shore edges the Atlantic.

After graduating from Weymouth High School, Laurie worked at the General Dynamics Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts. Tom graduated from “Poly Prep” in Brooklyn and went on to MIT. After graduating with B.S. and M.S. degrees, MIT’s ROTC took him to the U.S. Navy, assigned to the Quincy General Dynamics Shipyard, where, of course, he met Laurie. Within a few months they married. After they left the shipyard, Laurie worked for Mobil Oil and Tom went to Exxon in New York City. Wherever they lived there was water; Brooklyn, briefly, Darien, Connecticut, and Madison, New Jersey, for longer periods.

In Darien, they joined the Roton Point Sailing Association (RPSA) and raced a tornado class catamaran. They supported the RPSA on land, too — Laurie as Treasurer, Tom as Commodore. Summers found them vacationing at Hyannis at a Goddard family home.

Tom spent twenty-nine years at Exxon International. One early project, research on building large oil tankers, sent him to Scandinavia where the best facilities are located. “Some of the research models we used were pretty large themselves, forty feet long,” he commented. In 1973, Tom and a Dutch engineer, Wilhem Van Berlekom, won the Kinnard Prize of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers.

Laurie took advantage of Tom’s travel to visit the site and meet the researchers. She worked for Mobil for 21 years, including 10 of those as Assistant to the President. When Mobil moved to Virginia, she signed on with Exxon. “Commuting together was much pleasanter,” she observed smiling.

After retirement, the Goddards spent 20 summers on Cape Cod and winters in Stuart, Florida. They joined the U.S. Sailing Center in Martin County. The Center must have been delighted when two seasoned sailors volunteered for their race committee.

How did they find Plymouth Harbor? The Goddards searched Stuart and Delray Beach for Continuing Care Retirement Communities, then came to Sarasota. They drove by Plymouth Harbor and noted the waterside campus. After investigating, “We knew this was the place for us!” Laurie said.

So, two more water lovers are settling in here and appear happy with their decision.

 

Each year on Earth Day, various events are held across the globe to demonstrate support for environmental protection. At Plymouth Harbor, Earth Day, held last month on April 21st, is a campus-wide celebration of conservation efforts and a reminder to strive to do more each year.

Hosted by the Conservation Committee, the event continues to grow in size and creativity each year, offering vendor stations, giveaways, trivia, informational videos, prizes, and this year, a local produce vendor, Central Market, and a special interactive art installation. As with years past, the Conservation Committee also provided information on Plymouth Harbor’s recycling, water, and electricity conservation efforts.

The art installation (pictured above, right) used materials collected from the Resident Fund Shop and depicted a “love scene gone wrong.” Residents and visitors had the opportunity to vote on what happened, coming up with fun and far-reaching explanations.

Other noteworthy additions this year include a local produce vendor, the offering of Publix reusable shopping bags, and a fashion show and exhibit by the Fund Shop. Additionally, there was increased involvement from resident artists, displaying environmentally-friendly works of art across the room, with a special display from Smith Care Center residents. Visitors had the opportunity to vote on their favorite work of art, with the interactive art installation receiving the No. 1 spot. Winners of the trivia challenge included Susan Mauntel in first place and Alida de Jongh as runner-up. We look forward to next year’s event!
 
 

As residents of Sarasota since 1997, Drs. Sarah and George Pappas have a strong tie to Plymouth Harbor. Sarah first became aware of Plymouth Harbor 30 years ago through Peggy Bates, a very prominent person at New College of Florida and in the Sarasota community. In 2012, Sarah joined the Plymouth Harbor, Inc. Board of Trustees. She ended her term in January 2017, and served as Vice Chair for two years.

In November 2017, when the highly-anticipated Northwest Garden opens, Sarah and George will join us on the Plymouth Harbor campus as residents of the new building. In the meantime, the two are busy “rightsizing,” selling their home, and preparing for the move into their new apartment — in addition to balancing their work life.

Sarah is the current President of the William G. and Marie Selby Foundation, and the past president of Manatee Community College (now State College of Florida). While Sarah plans to step down from her position at the Selby Foundation this coming June, she is sure to remain busy with her positions on the Board of the Sarasota Tiger Bay Club and her recent appointment to the Ringling Museum Board of Trustees.

George is a talented abstract artist whose work can be found at the Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art Gallery, and additional galleries in Tampa and New Smyrna Beach. In fact, in 2011, the Ringling Museum acquired one of his works, “Double Trouble,” for its permanent collection. In addition, up until last year, George served on the Board of Trustees at the Hermitage Artist Retreat.

Both Sarah and George spent much of their lives working in higher education. Sarah received her master’s degree in social science education from the University of South Florida and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Nova Southeastern University. Her career spans 40 years at three community colleges and the University of Central Florida. George studied at the Massachusetts College of Art, then continued his arts-related education with a master’s from Harvard and Ph.D. from Penn State University. After teaching at Northern Iowa University and Penn State, he taught art education for 27 years at the University of South Florida, serving 10 years as chair of the art department.

When asked why they chose Plymouth Harbor as their new home, Sarah responded, “The fact that Plymouth Harbor was a non-profit was number one for us. The practice of having residents on the Board was another attraction. Since both George and I spent our whole lives in higher education, it reminded us of the shared governance that is seen in universities and colleges. It really impressed us.”

What are they most looking forward to in living in the Northwest Garden and at Plymouth Harbor? The couple highlighted their brand-new apartment, and its 10-foot ceilings and plentiful wall space to display George’s artwork, as well as the Bistro just down the hall for entertaining friends. Additionally, George plans to use their second bedroom as his art studio overlooking their waterfront view, and together, they plan to take advantage of the many lectures, seminars, and activities that take place on campus.

As November quickly approaches, we certainly look forward to welcoming Sarah and George.