With deep appreciation we recognize Tom Hopkins as he ends his second term as a trustee of the Plymouth Harbor Foundation Board of Trustees. A charter trustee of the Foundation, he was instrumental in drafting the Operating Agreement and filing the final documents to establish the Foundation in the spring of 2012. In addition to his two terms on the Foundation Board, Tom also served six years on the Board of Trustees for Plymouth Harbor, Inc. — four years as Chair.

His loyalty to the governance of Plymouth Harbor is second only to the contributions he has made over the years to help make Plymouth Harbor what it is today. His quiet and diligent leadership are impressive and have proved extremely effective. During his service, the Wellness Center was conceived, funded, and completed. The rejuvenation of Pilgrim Hall was planned, funded, and completed. He also served during the planning and groundbreaking of the Northwest Garden Building, scheduled to open late this year.

We extend a fond farewell and huge thanks to Tom Hopkins for his loyal and valuable service to The Plymouth Harbor Foundation. We will most certainly miss you.

“Tom Hopkins has definitely left his thumbprint on Plymouth Harbor, and for this we will forever be grateful,” stated Harry Hobson during a recent meeting.

At the January annual meeting of the Foundation Board, Cade Sibley was re-elected to Chair, Harry Hobson to Vice Chair, and Garry Jackson to Secretary/Treasurer. We welcome and appreciate their leadership.

Brain training is thought to go a long way in slowing the aging process. What exactly is brain training? Essentially, it means incorporating mental exercises that focus on the brain’s neuroplasticity (or ability to change and adapt) in your daily lifestyle. A new concept in neuroplasticity is being seen in combining physical and mental exercises to ultimately strengthen brain power over time.

We are able to increase our brain’s neuroplasticity at any time, simply by engaging in new activities and learning new skills. This new concept takes it one step further, combining our physical and mental exercises all at once.

For instance, working on a mind game such as Sudoku helps exercise the brain’s mathematical functions. However, research suggests that long-term benefits in the brain occur when there are multiple movements (Biscontini 2016). So, while you finish your game of Sudoku, consider performing a seated march in place. Another good example is trying to solve a moderately-complex math problem (without any paper) while exercising or walking. If you stop to let yourself think, you’ll notice that it becomes much easier and more comfortable to concentrate. However, this interferes with neuroplasticity training. The key is that any additional movement while performing a mental task is beneficial, no matter how big or small.

The separate benefits of physical and mental exercise on long-term brain health have been well-established. Over the years, we’ve learned more and more that mental stimulation (like crossword puzzles), aerobic exercise, and an active social life altogether contribute to an active brain. By combining neuroplasticity training with physical movement, studies show we can strengthen,
improve, and even change certain regions in the brain (Reynolds 2009). This is because you are training your brain to function in new and different ways while operating simultaneously with your body’s needs.

There are many ways to combine mental and physical exercise in brain training. Understand tasks your mind can accomplish while your body is in motion, and take control of your brain training.

Sources:
Biscontini, L. (2016, March). Fight Aging With Brain Training. Retrieved January 26, 2017, http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/fight-aging-with-brain-training

Reynolds, G. (2009, September 15). Phys Ed: What Sort of Exercise Can Make You Smarter? Retrieved January 26, 2017. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/16/what-sort-of-exercise-can-make-you-smarter/

Founded in 2002, the Sarasota Architectural Foundation (SAF) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting architectural excellence within the Sarasota Community, and advocating to preserve and increase awareness of the Sarasota School of Architecture movement.

The internationally-known movement began in the 1940s, bringing fresh, innovative designs to Sarasota homes and marking the high point in the development of regional modernism in American architecture. Founded by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph, it counts Victor Lundy, Gene Leedy, Tim Seibert, Jack West, and Carl Abbott among its practitioners. “The Sarasota School architects were using simple materials at the time, but were really pushing the boundaries of modern design,” says Janet Minker, SAF Board Chair. “We’re so lucky to have some of these amazing structures still standing today.”

SAF is the outgrowth of An American Legacy: The Sarasota School of Architecture Tour and Symposium, a five-day showcase in 2001. Developed by members of the Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, the tour was attended by design professionals, scholars, and individuals from around the world, and was comprised of lectures, guided bus and boat tours, a documentary, exhibitions, and social events. 

Since then, SAF has presented numerous architectural tours of homes and public buildings, film screenings, and educational events for design professionals and the general public. In addition to funding two annual SAF-Paul Rudolph scholarships for architecture students, the organization also informs city and county leaders about the importance of the Sarasota School of Architecture movement and the benefits of preserving its structures. In fact, SAF was instrumental in advocating for the rehabilitation of the Paul Rudolph-designed Sarasota High School Addition and continues to advocate to retain the school’s Rudolph Walkway Canopy.

For the last three years, SAF has hosted SarasotaMOD Weekend, a mid-century modern architecture festival. As part of the 2015 SarasotaMOD Weekend, SAF constructed a full-scale replica of the 1952 Paul Rudolph-designed Walker Guest House. The replica opened for tours on November 6, 2015, on the grounds of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. Since its opening, SAF’s trained docents have greeted over 44,000 visitors, and counting, as the exhibit remains open daily with free admission until April 2017.

Resident Nathalie McCulloch has been an active member of the Sarasota community for over 40 years, with a dedicated focus on the local architectural movement. She has been an SAF member since its inception, serving as a docent for many years. In addition, two of the Walker Guest House docents can be found here at Plymouth Harbor — Carolyn Montgomery and Suzanne Freund. To serve in this position, the two participated in a training program focused on the project’s history, the architect himself, and the home’s design principles. Suzanne Freund comments, “My husband and I always had an interest in architecture, and it’s quite interesting to serve as a docent. I’ve had the opportunity to meet with architects from all over the world — China, Italy, and Brazil to name a few.”

If you’re interested in learning more about SAF, please visit www.SarasotaArchitecturalFoundation.org.

You asked. We answered. At a recent Café Chat with Harry, several questions were raised regarding the Northwest Garden Building. Below is a summary of this information. Please note that a new video discussing building details and construction progress is in production and will be shown at an upcoming February Resident Meeting (date forthcoming).

What will replace the Callahan Center Assisted Living space when the current residents are moved to the new Assisted Living Residence?
As many of you know, the space where the Callahan Center resides will become vacant when our assisted living residents are moved to the new building. At present, it is not known what will occupy this space. We presume this will be determined in late Spring 2017.

How will occupancy be determined for the new Assisted Living Residence?
Current residents of the Callahan Center have first choice of apartments in the new Assisted Living Residence. Following that, residents from the Smith Care Center who qualify for living in the new Assisted Living would be given the opportunity to transfer. Then priority will be given to Plymouth Harbor residents who are currently on the internal wait list and those who may need to consider Assisted Living. If apartments remain available, our final step will be to open it up to our Harbor Club wait list and then to non-Plymouth Harbor Sarasota community residents. If you are interested in being placed on the wait list, please contact Liz Clark, Administrator of Assisted Living/Director of Home Care, Ext. 245.

How will therapy change when the new building is opened?
The current therapy gym, which is located in the Smith Care Center, will remain as is. We see this space primarily being utilized by Smith Care Center residents. When the Northwest Garden Building is complete, we plan to open a new outpatient therapy gym for use by both our independent living residents and non-Plymouth Harbor Sarasota community residents. The new therapy gym will be placed in N-213. At 1,650 square feet, this space is the perfect size and location for this amenity.

Will the new building have its own kitchen and dining staff?
Yes. However, much of the preparation will be done in the Mayflower Restaurant kitchen, as is currently done for the Smith Care Center. Chef René has been involved in the planning process for the new building, and is confident in the ability of the kitchen staff to meet the increased demand for dining.

When the new building is complete in November 2017, what will be the process for residents who will be moving in?
We are currently in the process of developing a “traffic schedule.” To do this, we are meeting with residents who will occupy the new building and are creating a list and timeline that will allow for a smooth, gradual move-in process.

What is the current status of the Multi-Use Recreational Trail (MURT)?
As it stands, the City is responsible for finishing the MURT trail, including the portion from Plymouth Harbor’s entrance east to the Sarasota Yacht Club. This is slated to begin Fall 2017.

The Foundation just completed its fifth year in operation. Much has been accomplished, and many lives have been positively affected. The year 2016 was our most impressive yet, with total gifts raised exceeding $3 million — $1.525 million in current gifts and $1.546 million in deferred giving. Below is a summary of the funds that benefitted from the current gifts. Please note: numbers are rounded.

Zest For Life: Capital Projects $ 1,258,130
Resident Assistance $ 1,450
Zest For Life: Programs $ 18,970
General – Unrestricted $ 155,221
Employee Assistance $ 91,700

Deferred giving in 2016 was equally as impressive, exceeding $1.5 million in intended gifts. Donors to deferred giving are those who have identified the Plymouth Harbor Foundation in their estate plans in some way, thus joining the MacNeil Society. In 2016 alone, we welcomed 13 new MacNeil Society members, bringing our total members to 39. Interest in giving to the various projects and programs of the Foundation continues to bring in new donors.

In 2016, 47% of residents, 85% of board members, and 70% of management staff participated in giving to the Foundation. We are sincerely grateful to these participants. Finally, a measurement used throughout the country in effectiveness of any philanthropy program is the amount of money it costs to raise $1. The national average is 20 cents. Our cost for 2016 was 9 cents.

You can find a complete summary of giving in our 2016 Impact Report, which will be released at the end of March. Thank you to everyone for a great year!

After receiving his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from Cornell University, Dr. Lou Newman moved to Montana and developed a veterinary practice, a wholesale drug supply business, and a cattle ranch. He later made the decision to join the faculty of Michigan State University’s Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, where he completed his Ph.D. in Veterinary Pathology. Dr. Newman went on to work with two more universities before retiring and focusing on his passion for photography.

Has he always had a desire to work with animals? And what are his surprising stories from time spent with cowboys and cattle?

View his January 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

“I’ve been very fortunate in my life,” Norma Schatz says with a smile. “I had a wonderful marriage, have wonderful children, and am very blessed in whom I know…As I said, it’s been a most fortunate life.” Indeed it has.

Norma was born in New York and grew up in both Manhattan and Long Island. However, in between stints in New York, Norma and her mother moved abroad to live in Paris — twice. The first time was for a year and a half when she was very young, and the second was at the age of 14 for six months while her older sister studied abroad in Europe.

After returning to the U.S. and finishing high school in Manhattan, Norma attended Cornell University, where she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. She then went on to work for MGM Studios doing movie research. She and her late husband, Michael, were married in 1945 and settled down in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut. They had three sons and two daughters.

Norma spent a few years working in personnel for a department store. Then, as Norma says, she “kept working, but not for money.” She became involved in the local community and in politics.
“I can remember carrying my first child in a bassinet to a League of Women Voters meeting,” she laughs.

Norma went on to run for (and win) a seat on the West Hartford Board of Education and for the state legislature (and lost). She was also involved with the Community Council in charge of their Legislative Information Service, worked with the Connecticut Child Welfare Association, was on the board of Planned Parenthood, and chaired a study of the juvenile justice system. This resulted in an appointment by the Governor to the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee as a citizen representative, where she served for nearly 30 years.

In her time on the committee, Norma says she was very much aware of the different, and disproportionate, way children were treated if they were “from the wrong side of the tracks.” Her mission was to help bridge this gap, sharing research and information from her experiences in the community to help improve the system.

Similar to her own upbringing, Norma incorporated travel into her children’s lives as well. “I wanted them to know that they were a part of a big world,” she says. “To get to know and appreciate other cultures.” While they never lived abroad, Norma and her husband took many trips traveling through Europe. She fondly remembers one trip in particular where the family spent an entire month at a home in Spain — for what cost only $450 at the time.

In the early 2000s, when she and Michael decided to move full-time to Longboat Key, Norma stepped down from her post on the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee. Again, Norma immediately became an active member of her community. This time, however, she focused on working with Planned Parenthood and the Sarasota Democratic Party, rather than focusing specifically on children’s issues. “I write a lot of letters,” she laughs. Along with nearly 10,000 others, Norma even participated in the Sarasota Women’s Solidarity March across the John Ringling Causeway on January 21st.

When asked why she chose Sarasota, Norma shares stories of visiting her parents here in the 1960s, discussing the growth of the local community and citing the influence of the arts, even then. After moving to Sarasota, Norma reconnected with childhood friends Richard and Marian Kessler, for whom she was the Maid of Honor at their wedding. In 2007, Norma, then widowed, joined her longtime friends and moved into Plymouth Harbor.

When she’s not volunteering, Norma enjoys the local arts, including ballet and theatre. At Plymouth Harbor, she serves on the Library Committee and Residents Association Executive Council as Executive Associate Liaison to Residents. Norma jokes that she was never able to learn bridge, but she does manage to play Scrabble once a week with friends.

Most importantly, Norma enjoys spending time with her four children and nine grandchildren, located all over the map — from Kentucky to Pennsylvania and New York to England. With an upcoming trip planned for Paris in March, it’s not likely that Norma will be slowing down anytime soon.

“History has provided us with many examples of nurses’ contributions to mankind. But what sets us apart as a recognized profession?” asks Karen Novak, Director of Health Services. “Tradition! Florence Nightingale was a change agent and seemed to do it without compromise; leadership techniques and advocacy were many of her strong points. It is important to have these traits to
provide nursing students with the tools necessary to promote health.”

The tradition of nursing care is alive and passionate at Plymouth Harbor. Suncoast Technical College’s (STC) Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) program partnered with Plymouth Harbor’s Smith Care Center (SCC) years ago, but somehow that tradition fell through the cracks. Dedicated leadership at Plymouth Harbor decided to get things back on track, and the revival of the tradition resumed in November 2016.

STC’s LPN program is a one-year program where students gain both classroom and real-world experience — completing six months in a “freshman” course and their second six months in an advanced course. As a result, half of their time is spent honing skills in the classroom, while the other half is spent completing student clinicals at numerous healthcare sites, including Plymouth Harbor.

According to Clinical Instructor Michelle Boudreaux, there are three clinical instructors. Students rotate between healthcare facilities, allowing them to work in different environments with different instructors. Boudreaux notes that while the maximum number of students allowed by law in a class is 12, STC limits theirs to seven, ultimately providing a much more in-depth, hands-on experience.

By working in environments such as Plymouth Harbor, students are able to learn delegation, management, and can witness first-hand how facilities function as a team. At the end of each clinical rotation, students are asked to provide a “head-to-toe” assessment to their instructor, along with a Medicare note and patient history. Additionally, the students conduct a daily “post-conference” in which they discuss items that came up and how they solved them. Under supervision, students are able to perform general patient care and some skills such as IVs, dressing changes, vital signs, and patient assessments.

To succeed in nursing, a strong and broad foundation must be laid to build upon. SCC’s tenured nurses are all too happy to contribute to building this foundation, seeing these novice nursing students bloom right before their eyes. For some SCC nurses, it is a completion of the circle they started many years ago, as they, too, were in the shoes of the students not so long ago. SCC LPN, and STC graduate, Manny Flores remembers it well, and now facilitates the growth of many students as they learn.

“To touch the life of a student and give them wings to grow is our goal here at Plymouth Harbor,” Karen says. “Who knows, you might find them one day in our healthcare center taking care of you!”

During the last 37 years Myron Robinson has served as President/CEO of various Urban League affiliates around the country and is a consultant to the National Urban League in New York City. He was also a Marketing & Senior Sales Executive for AT&T. Before moving to paradise in the Sarasota area in 2009, he was an Executive-in-Residence at the School of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University.

Myron has had a multi-faceted volunteer career. He served on numerous boards in Cleveland including John Carroll University, Key Bank and University Hospitals. He is past Chair of the Board of Directors of Doctors Hospital here in Sarasota and is serving on the Manatee County Library Board and the Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce. Myron has been a member of the First Congregational United Church of Christ for seven years. He has served as a Deacon, Vice Moderator, Moderator, and Past Moderator of the Church Council. He is married to Brenda K. Robinson, a mixed-media artist. They have two adult children and four grandchildren.

“I have a passionate interest in continuing the long, productive relationship with First Congregational United Church of Christ and to further developing strategies to diversify Plymouth Harbor.”

On Friday, December 16th, Plymouth Harbor held a surprise celebration for the retirement of our longest-serving employee, housekeeper Lanette Davis. She spent her last day at Plymouth Harbor on December 30, 2016, after more than 42 years of service.

In December 1973, at 22 years old, Lanette filled out an application for a housekeeping position at the suggestion of a friend. One interview was all it took and she was on the floor the next day. Lanette credits her length of service to an outstanding work environment and exceptional leadership. Most of all, however, she credits the sense of family she feels with both her co-workers and the residents she has cared for over the years.

Residents and employees alike gathered on the Mezzanine to celebrate Lanette, honoring her decades of service with laughs, cake, memory books filled with photos, a special plaque recognizing her dedication to Plymouth Harbor, and, of course, her favorite flowers (yellow roses). Special guests in attendance included Lanette’s son and husband.

“In this type of environment, it’s not often that you see this kind of cross-culture with residents and staff,” resident Dr. Paul Groen remarked. Residents and coworkers went on to share stories of their years spent with Lanette, consistently noting her unwavering positive attitude, work ethic, and contagious smile. “In my 13 years, she’s never not had a smile on her face,” says resident Ish Pedersen with a smile. “She will be missed.”