By: Becky Pazkowski

On March 17, at the third of the three-part Series A Look Inside, The Plymouth Harbor Foundation announced that over the last nine months a campaign committee has been working quietly to garner support for the Memory Care Program and Residence. The result of that early work is nearly 50 gifts that total over $2,337,000 toward the $3 million campaign! This announcement marks the official launch of the campaign, and we will work diligently between now and the November opening to raise the additional funds needed to meet the goal.

What will the $3 million support?
The $3 million raised in this campaign will establish a premier program in innovative care. The funding will be divided into two pieces: $2 million into a Designated Investment Fund, and $1 million for Capital Resources necessary to support programs. You will find these two components described in detail below.

Designated Investment Fund ($2 million)
This fund will generate income, from which we will draw $100,000 (or five percent) annually to support our two program components: Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming.

Educational Leadership ($40,000)
We have adopted the Positive Approach™ to Care (PAC), developed by Teepa Snow, whose techniques and training models are used throughout the world. Campus-wide training on this approach is ongoing for all of our employees caring for and interacting with persons with dementia. The premier program funded by the campaign will allow us to expand the training to include family members and the community-at-large. Educational Leadership and associated annual cost is defined by four components:

Staff Training ($10,000): We currently train all of our staff in the PAC model, and we will continue to do so on a semi-annual basis. With the additional funding from the campaign, we will be able to increase the frequency to quarterly, or even monthly training.

Family Support and One-On-One Counseling ($10,000): We plan to continue our family support groups, which have proven beneficial to those experiencing dementia with a loved one. With funding from the campaign, we will be able to offer one-on-one support and counseling.

Lecture Series ($15,000): We plan to bring local experts to share the latest in research and treatment of dementia. With the additional funding, we will be able to look beyond our own backyard to bring nationally- and internationally-known experts who will share their knowledge on the latest breakthrough research and treatments, to bring us hope that progress is being made throughout the world.

Community Education ($5000): The additional funding from the campaign will allow us to offer community education, outside of our campus, to help demystify and normalize behaviors associated with dementia-related diseases.

Inspirational Programming ($60,000)
A diagnosis of dementia is devastating for the entire family. We understand it is the present in which one must live…to seek and celebrate the joy and connection that happen in a moment. The premier programs that we will establish will bring fulfilling opportunities to spark that engagement in the moment within each resident. This will be accomplished through:

Expressive arts and wellness programs ($10,000): To encourage our residents to connect and communicate throughout their journey. While our program will include staff-driven activities, the campaign funding will allow us to bring professional therapists to our campus.

Spiritual and faith-based programs ($10,000): To nourish the souls of our residents through this stage of their life. The funding from the campaign will allow us to supplement our own chaplain-led offerings with guest pastors and spiritual leaders in the community.

Intellectually stimulating programs ($20,000): Offered by staff to fulfill the need for human curiosity, while celebrating skills and capabilities residents spent their lifetime developing. The additional funding will make it possible to expand these programs to deliver individually-designed and executed plans for each resident.

Social opportunities ($20,000): Offered frequently by staff, these events will create community. The additional funding will allow us to bring all residents, families, and staff together for professionally-led musical concerts, receptions, and holiday events that are so important to stay connected and engaged with our loved ones.

Capital Resources ($1 million)
The education and programming described above requires additional capital resources to deliver the premier program level of which we are so capable. These items include, but are not limited to:

– Water features, interactive musical instruments, and shaded seating in the Courtyard Gardens.
– Brain games such as “It’s Never Too Late,” chapel equipment, and musical instruments in Family Rooms.
– Massage recliners and sound systems in the Reflection Rooms.
– Aquariums, tactile interactions, and sensory stations in the Sensory Circles.
– Art, musical, and fitness equipment in the Life Enrichment Centers.
– And so much more.

When philanthropy — your philanthropy — is combined with the vision of others, an opportunity emerges to establish Plymouth Harbor as the premier leader in inspirational care and education for those challenged with dementia. This is important to our current and future memory care residents and their families. We hope it is important to all of you, too.

 

By: Judy Sarnowski, ADC, CDP, Smith Care Center’s Activity Director

In any Skilled Nursing Facility, this adage unfortunately holds true when attempting to design an activity calendar that fits the leisure patterns of adults who have diverse backgrounds, levels of education, and religious preferences. Throw varying degrees of cognition into the mix and the challenge to provide activities that appeal to the majority of your residents, becomes
even greater.

Experienced activity directors know that the key to developing a successful program is to find a common thread within the patchwork quilt of each person’s interests, the three most common being some form of exercise, music, and reading. Once that is accomplished, the task of providing activities that have a global appeal to your resident population becomes much simpler.

The next step is to simplify each activity into segments that can be altered to match each resident’s specific abilities. Variations of card games like UNO allow residents with varying levels of cognitive ability the opportunity to participate and enjoy a positive experience. Adaptive devices and task segmentation can also be used to facilitate the participation of a large group of residents in a single activity.

For example, the task of building a birdhouse could evolve into a successful activity simply by assigning the more difficult aspects of the project, like measuring and cutting, to residents capable of performing these tasks, and allowing those with cognitive or physical limitations the opportunity to perform simpler tasks like sanding or painting.

In a Life Plan Community, activity offerings should address the individual needs and interests of residents within their specific level of care. At times, this can be difficult to achieve as residents whose needs are ever-increasing are unable to move through the care continuum due to lack of available space. As Plymouth Harbor nears the completion of our Northwest Garden Building —complete with state-of-the-art Memory Care and Assisted Living Residences — we will be able to offer enhanced activities for each individual resident and accommodate the influx of people searching for the ultimate destination in which to live life to the fullest.

 

By: Becky Pazkowski

The grief of losing someone near and dear to us is very personal. Comfort may come in a variety of forms. When my mother died at age 73 (way too soon, in my mind), I struggled with doing something meaningful and positive at a time when I wasn’t feeling too positive. Since her illness was very rare, I couldn’t make a donation to support research into it, as there wasn’t really an organization that did that. What I, and others, settled on was a non-profit that she gave to throughout her lifetime. Somehow, through making a donation in her memory to an organization that she was passionate about made sense to me, and it helped me to find some comfort with her death.

Memorial gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation have been a source of comfort to families, knowing that gifts support programs and capital projects for the good of everyone at Plymouth Harbor. In 2016 alone, over 100 memorial gifts were made, totaling more than $14,000. We put these donated dollars to work supporting programs, employee education, training, hardship cases, and many other causes. Just as I had received some comfort knowing that another’s life would be made better as a result of my mother’s death, our hope is that memorial donors find peace and solace knowing the same.

By: Becky Pazkowski

In January, we said goodbye to a longtime friend of Plymouth Harbor, Priscilla Heindel. Priscilla and her husband Dennis moved to Sarasota from Massachusetts in 1988, and into Plymouth Harbor in 1997. They were members of the First Congregational United Church of Christ in Sarasota. Dennis passed away in 2006, and in 2011 Priscilla moved to Albuquerque to be closer to family.

Priscilla has been a loyal annual donor to the Foundation, through their Donor Advised Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. We learned of her death in February and subsequently received a gift in memory of the couple. Their daughter, Kathy Kuy, has been very kind in representing Priscilla over the last few years. Priscilla spent her final years at an assisted living residence in Albuquerque. We wish to extend our sympathy to the family of Priscilla and Dennis Heindel, for the loss of their mother, and a kind thank you for the support over the years to make life at Plymouth Harbor the best it can be. We are honored to welcome our newest member to the MacNeil Society.

By: Becky Pazkowski

In 2015, a Foundation trustee phoned a resident donor to thank her for her gift to the Foundation. During their conversation, the donor mentioned that she didn’t know a lot about the Foundation and thought that it might be nice to have a tea every now and then so that residents can ask questions and learn about the good things the Foundation is doing. Since then, nearly 60 guests have attended one of the Foundation Teas. They are small groups, typically hosted by two Foundation trustees, and held in one of the colony card rooms. If you have not come to a Foundation Tea, and are interested, please call Becky Pazkowski at Ext. 398 and we will be sure to add you to the guest list for the future.

In the January 2017 issue of Harbor Light, we introduced the Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) clinicals program from Suncoast Technical College (STC) that is partnering with our Smith Care Center. Now, we’d like to introduce STC’s Certified Nursing Assistant program, which began working with the SCC at the end of February.

This program, known as the Health Careers Program, is the first step toward a future in nursing for many students. The program works with high school juniors and seniors from schools across the county who are interested in both nursing and overall healthcare.

In their first semester, students learn about the broader spectrum of healthcare; in their second semester, they focus on nursing curriculum. During this time, students perform clinicals for the period of one month at various facilities in the area, including Plymouth Harbor — spending half the day on their school campus and the other half performing clinicals. At the completion of the program, students have the option to take the state CNA Exam. While many choose this option, others decide to further their nursing education and enroll in STC’s LPN program.

According to Clinical Instructor Linda Hart, RN, MSN, STC is the only high school program that offers training in hands-on patient care. Linda joined STC 16 years ago, and throughout the years, she has seen the program grow from three students to over 160. Today, the program has anywhere from nine to 13 students onsite with instructors. In the SCC, students are paired with a CNA, and are able to assist with items such as denture care, hair and nail care, range-of-motion exercises, meal assistance, and more. “It’s a natural fit because many of Plymouth Harbor’s nurses graduated from this program,” Linda says.

Karen Novak, SCC Director of Health Services, adds, “Care is the essence of nursing and the dominant, distinctive, and unifying feature.” She goes on to say that care is taught day-by-day by working with the novice learner. Stepping into a new environment can overwhelm anyone, but the nurses in the SCC help to guide STC’s students through their first experiences in healthcare, giving them permission to ask questions, seek out answers, and learn as much as possible in the process.

“It’s the joy of my life. This program changes our students’ lives,” Linda says. “It gives them confidence and a purpose for learning — what a gift.”

With deep appreciation we recognize Tom Hopkins as he ends his second term as a trustee of the Plymouth Harbor Foundation Board of Trustees. A charter trustee of the Foundation, he was instrumental in drafting the Operating Agreement and filing the final documents to establish the Foundation in the spring of 2012. In addition to his two terms on the Foundation Board, Tom also served six years on the Board of Trustees for Plymouth Harbor, Inc. — four years as Chair.

His loyalty to the governance of Plymouth Harbor is second only to the contributions he has made over the years to help make Plymouth Harbor what it is today. His quiet and diligent leadership are impressive and have proved extremely effective. During his service, the Wellness Center was conceived, funded, and completed. The rejuvenation of Pilgrim Hall was planned, funded, and completed. He also served during the planning and groundbreaking of the Northwest Garden Building, scheduled to open late this year.

We extend a fond farewell and huge thanks to Tom Hopkins for his loyal and valuable service to The Plymouth Harbor Foundation. We will most certainly miss you.

“Tom Hopkins has definitely left his thumbprint on Plymouth Harbor, and for this we will forever be grateful,” stated Harry Hobson during a recent meeting.

At the January annual meeting of the Foundation Board, Cade Sibley was re-elected to Chair, Harry Hobson to Vice Chair, and Garry Jackson to Secretary/Treasurer. We welcome and appreciate their leadership.

The Foundation just completed its fifth year in operation. Much has been accomplished, and many lives have been positively affected. The year 2016 was our most impressive yet, with total gifts raised exceeding $3 million — $1.525 million in current gifts and $1.546 million in deferred giving. Below is a summary of the funds that benefitted from the current gifts. Please note: numbers are rounded.

Zest For Life: Capital Projects $ 1,258,130
Resident Assistance $ 1,450
Zest For Life: Programs $ 18,970
General – Unrestricted $ 155,221
Employee Assistance $ 91,700

Deferred giving in 2016 was equally as impressive, exceeding $1.5 million in intended gifts. Donors to deferred giving are those who have identified the Plymouth Harbor Foundation in their estate plans in some way, thus joining the MacNeil Society. In 2016 alone, we welcomed 13 new MacNeil Society members, bringing our total members to 39. Interest in giving to the various projects and programs of the Foundation continues to bring in new donors.

In 2016, 47% of residents, 85% of board members, and 70% of management staff participated in giving to the Foundation. We are sincerely grateful to these participants. Finally, a measurement used throughout the country in effectiveness of any philanthropy program is the amount of money it costs to raise $1. The national average is 20 cents. Our cost for 2016 was 9 cents.

You can find a complete summary of giving in our 2016 Impact Report, which will be released at the end of March. Thank you to everyone for a great year!

“History has provided us with many examples of nurses’ contributions to mankind. But what sets us apart as a recognized profession?” asks Karen Novak, Director of Health Services. “Tradition! Florence Nightingale was a change agent and seemed to do it without compromise; leadership techniques and advocacy were many of her strong points. It is important to have these traits to
provide nursing students with the tools necessary to promote health.”

The tradition of nursing care is alive and passionate at Plymouth Harbor. Suncoast Technical College’s (STC) Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) program partnered with Plymouth Harbor’s Smith Care Center (SCC) years ago, but somehow that tradition fell through the cracks. Dedicated leadership at Plymouth Harbor decided to get things back on track, and the revival of the tradition resumed in November 2016.

STC’s LPN program is a one-year program where students gain both classroom and real-world experience — completing six months in a “freshman” course and their second six months in an advanced course. As a result, half of their time is spent honing skills in the classroom, while the other half is spent completing student clinicals at numerous healthcare sites, including Plymouth Harbor.

According to Clinical Instructor Michelle Boudreaux, there are three clinical instructors. Students rotate between healthcare facilities, allowing them to work in different environments with different instructors. Boudreaux notes that while the maximum number of students allowed by law in a class is 12, STC limits theirs to seven, ultimately providing a much more in-depth, hands-on experience.

By working in environments such as Plymouth Harbor, students are able to learn delegation, management, and can witness first-hand how facilities function as a team. At the end of each clinical rotation, students are asked to provide a “head-to-toe” assessment to their instructor, along with a Medicare note and patient history. Additionally, the students conduct a daily “post-conference” in which they discuss items that came up and how they solved them. Under supervision, students are able to perform general patient care and some skills such as IVs, dressing changes, vital signs, and patient assessments.

To succeed in nursing, a strong and broad foundation must be laid to build upon. SCC’s tenured nurses are all too happy to contribute to building this foundation, seeing these novice nursing students bloom right before their eyes. For some SCC nurses, it is a completion of the circle they started many years ago, as they, too, were in the shoes of the students not so long ago. SCC LPN, and STC graduate, Manny Flores remembers it well, and now facilitates the growth of many students as they learn.

“To touch the life of a student and give them wings to grow is our goal here at Plymouth Harbor,” Karen says. “Who knows, you might find them one day in our healthcare center taking care of you!”

On Thursday, December 22, 2016, Plymouth Harbor held a wonderful “red carpet” Grand Opening event for our newly rejuvenated Pilgrim Hall. All in all, the event celebrations included a donor appreciation, red carpet photos, self-guided tours, a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony, and a celebratory reception.

The first Project Design Team meeting for the rejuvenation of Pilgrim Hall was held on December 22, 2015, exactly one year before the Grand Opening, and official renovations began in July 2015. Today, only seven months later, the new hall features exciting upgrades, including acoustics, seating, lighting, state-of-the-art technology, and more.

As a part of Pilgrim Hall’s Grand Opening, we have prepared a special program lineup beginning this month that will run through the end of February. These programs specifically showcase the variety of amenities that are now offered in Pilgrim Hall.

We are so very grateful to all those who helped this dream become a reality and to those who celebrated the opening of Pilgrim Hall with us. As the New Year begins, we look forward to offering many new and exciting programs here at Plymouth Harbor.