In March 2017, Plymouth Harbor published the Northwest Garden Building, a special edition of the Harbor Light resident newsletter. This publication is intended to provide the most up-to-date information regarding the Northwest Garden Building. Please note that the images used in this publication are only renderings, not exact depictions of what each space will look like in terms of décor, design, etc.

To view the electronic version of this publication, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

By: Becky Pazkowski

On March 17, at the third of the three-part Series A Look Inside, The Plymouth Harbor Foundation announced that over the last nine months a campaign committee has been working quietly to garner support for the Memory Care Program and Residence. The result of that early work is nearly 50 gifts that total over $2,337,000 toward the $3 million campaign! This announcement marks the official launch of the campaign, and we will work diligently between now and the November opening to raise the additional funds needed to meet the goal.

What will the $3 million support?
The $3 million raised in this campaign will establish a premier program in innovative care. The funding will be divided into two pieces: $2 million into a Designated Investment Fund, and $1 million for Capital Resources necessary to support programs. You will find these two components described in detail below.

Designated Investment Fund ($2 million)
This fund will generate income, from which we will draw $100,000 (or five percent) annually to support our two program components: Educational Leadership and Inspirational Programming.

Educational Leadership ($40,000)
We have adopted the Positive Approach™ to Care (PAC), developed by Teepa Snow, whose techniques and training models are used throughout the world. Campus-wide training on this approach is ongoing for all of our employees caring for and interacting with persons with dementia. The premier program funded by the campaign will allow us to expand the training to include family members and the community-at-large. Educational Leadership and associated annual cost is defined by four components:

Staff Training ($10,000): We currently train all of our staff in the PAC model, and we will continue to do so on a semi-annual basis. With the additional funding from the campaign, we will be able to increase the frequency to quarterly, or even monthly training.

Family Support and One-On-One Counseling ($10,000): We plan to continue our family support groups, which have proven beneficial to those experiencing dementia with a loved one. With funding from the campaign, we will be able to offer one-on-one support and counseling.

Lecture Series ($15,000): We plan to bring local experts to share the latest in research and treatment of dementia. With the additional funding, we will be able to look beyond our own backyard to bring nationally- and internationally-known experts who will share their knowledge on the latest breakthrough research and treatments, to bring us hope that progress is being made throughout the world.

Community Education ($5000): The additional funding from the campaign will allow us to offer community education, outside of our campus, to help demystify and normalize behaviors associated with dementia-related diseases.

Inspirational Programming ($60,000)
A diagnosis of dementia is devastating for the entire family. We understand it is the present in which one must live…to seek and celebrate the joy and connection that happen in a moment. The premier programs that we will establish will bring fulfilling opportunities to spark that engagement in the moment within each resident. This will be accomplished through:

Expressive arts and wellness programs ($10,000): To encourage our residents to connect and communicate throughout their journey. While our program will include staff-driven activities, the campaign funding will allow us to bring professional therapists to our campus.

Spiritual and faith-based programs ($10,000): To nourish the souls of our residents through this stage of their life. The funding from the campaign will allow us to supplement our own chaplain-led offerings with guest pastors and spiritual leaders in the community.

Intellectually stimulating programs ($20,000): Offered by staff to fulfill the need for human curiosity, while celebrating skills and capabilities residents spent their lifetime developing. The additional funding will make it possible to expand these programs to deliver individually-designed and executed plans for each resident.

Social opportunities ($20,000): Offered frequently by staff, these events will create community. The additional funding will allow us to bring all residents, families, and staff together for professionally-led musical concerts, receptions, and holiday events that are so important to stay connected and engaged with our loved ones.

Capital Resources ($1 million)
The education and programming described above requires additional capital resources to deliver the premier program level of which we are so capable. These items include, but are not limited to:

– Water features, interactive musical instruments, and shaded seating in the Courtyard Gardens.
– Brain games such as “It’s Never Too Late,” chapel equipment, and musical instruments in Family Rooms.
– Massage recliners and sound systems in the Reflection Rooms.
– Aquariums, tactile interactions, and sensory stations in the Sensory Circles.
– Art, musical, and fitness equipment in the Life Enrichment Centers.
– And so much more.

When philanthropy — your philanthropy — is combined with the vision of others, an opportunity emerges to establish Plymouth Harbor as the premier leader in inspirational care and education for those challenged with dementia. This is important to our current and future memory care residents and their families. We hope it is important to all of you, too.

 

Located on Orange Avenue in downtown Sarasota, the Woman’s Exchange is a consignment store like no other. It began in 1962 with the idea to create a business means of supporting local arts in Sarasota and Manatee counties. The Woman’s Exchange was formed as a result, offering affordably priced treasures like Tiffany silver, Gucci handbags, fine jewelry, women’s clothing, high-end furniture, oriental rugs, and more. In fact, Lara Spencer of ABC’s “Good Morning America” and PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow” even lists the Woman’s Exchange as one of her favorite places to shop in her book, I Brake for Yard Sales

Along with a staff of nearly 20 employees, the 12,000 square foot store has over 230 dedicated volunteers who ensure that the ever-changing inventory is filled to the brim. Individuals are able to designate specific participating charities to receive their consignor profits, which is 65 percent of sale price. Additionally, any unsold clothing, furniture, and household items are typically donated to other local non-profit organizations, such as the Salvation Army and the Pines of Sarasota.

Through its consignment operation, the Woman’s Exchange has awarded more than $7.8 million in grants and scholarships to support the arts of Sarasota and Manatee, such as the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall, Asolo Theatre, Sarasota Opera, student scholarships, and more.

Resident Barbara MacLean became involved with the Woman’s Exchange nearly 26 years ago. At the suggestion of a friend, Barbara began as a seasonal volunteer when she and her husband spent their winters on Longboat Key, and continued her involvement when they moved to Sarasota full-time. Barbara works at the front desk, helping to check out customers and package their items. “The fun part is getting to know the customers,” she says. “People come from all over — New Hampshire, Maine, New Jersey, and some even drive up from Venice and Naples.”

Residents Mary Allyn and Weta Cannon began volunteering at the Woman’s Exchange five years ago. The two were instrumental in establishing the Encore! & More Consignment Shop, which benefited the Women’s Resource Center, and when it closed its doors, they decided to focus their efforts on the Woman’s Exchange. Once a week, they volunteer together doing pricing and computer input. “We think the world of the Woman’s Exchange team,” Mary says. Weta adds, “It’s an amazing organization in terms of its financial and moral support of the arts in our community. They really do a wonderful job.”

In addition to volunteering, numerous Plymouth Harbor residents support the mission of the Woman’s Exchange by both consigning and donating. To learn more, you may visit their website at www.SarasotaWEX.com.

 

By: Judy Sarnowski, ADC, CDP, Smith Care Center’s Activity Director

In any Skilled Nursing Facility, this adage unfortunately holds true when attempting to design an activity calendar that fits the leisure patterns of adults who have diverse backgrounds, levels of education, and religious preferences. Throw varying degrees of cognition into the mix and the challenge to provide activities that appeal to the majority of your residents, becomes
even greater.

Experienced activity directors know that the key to developing a successful program is to find a common thread within the patchwork quilt of each person’s interests, the three most common being some form of exercise, music, and reading. Once that is accomplished, the task of providing activities that have a global appeal to your resident population becomes much simpler.

The next step is to simplify each activity into segments that can be altered to match each resident’s specific abilities. Variations of card games like UNO allow residents with varying levels of cognitive ability the opportunity to participate and enjoy a positive experience. Adaptive devices and task segmentation can also be used to facilitate the participation of a large group of residents in a single activity.

For example, the task of building a birdhouse could evolve into a successful activity simply by assigning the more difficult aspects of the project, like measuring and cutting, to residents capable of performing these tasks, and allowing those with cognitive or physical limitations the opportunity to perform simpler tasks like sanding or painting.

In a Life Plan Community, activity offerings should address the individual needs and interests of residents within their specific level of care. At times, this can be difficult to achieve as residents whose needs are ever-increasing are unable to move through the care continuum due to lack of available space. As Plymouth Harbor nears the completion of our Northwest Garden Building —complete with state-of-the-art Memory Care and Assisted Living Residences — we will be able to offer enhanced activities for each individual resident and accommodate the influx of people searching for the ultimate destination in which to live life to the fullest.

 

By: Addie Hurst

That new, young, attractive couple you have been meeting in the elevator is Connie Sanders and Carl Koenig. They are very friendly and easy to talk to.

The most unique thing about them is that over a period of time they have befriended 24 students who have lived with them while attending college. One of their protégées is now coincidentally working here at Plymouth Harbor. She is Krystle Harvey, the Office Coordinator in Marketing and Community Affairs. The “kids” they sponsored became part of the family, sharing space, meals, successes, and challenges. Over the years, many still maintain contact even though they are spread across the country.

Connie was born in Baltimore and received degrees from Towson University (Towson, Maryland) and the University of Kansas in Lawrence. She has been certified to teach social science and children with developmental delays and emotional disturbance. She was an Educational Resource Teacher and a Director of Special Education. In her career, she was most recently Director of Special Services for Liberty Public Schools in Missouri. Connie was also an adjunct professor at several colleges including Avila University, Central Missouri State University, and William Jewell College. Before retiring, she held various positions with United Way and was on the board for an agency serving battered women and children with developmental delays and behavioral and mental health issues.

Since moving to Florida, she has volunteered at All Faiths Food Bank, served as chairperson for the Rosedale Rally for the Cure, raising $45,000 each year, and sat on the Rosedale Homeowners Board as vice president in charge of common grounds. It should come as no surprise that she is already a member of the Plymouth Harbor Conservation Committee and is interested in becoming involved with the Fund Shop.

As you can imagine, Carl is no slouch either! His youth was spent in Dearborn, a Detroit suburb. He earned his undergraduate degree from Wayne State University, and his master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. The next ten years he worked on the development of Precision Teaching and the first non-discriminatory assessment instrument. Next he taught computer science at Maple Woods Metropolitan Community College in Kansas City, and chaired their business division. Carl then taught online courses for the following ten years. He served on his local school board for nine years, and served on the County Board of Adjusters and the area Vocational School Board. He then became business manager for the International Council of Fine Arts Deans.

Each December, they have “family” dinners for their kids; one in Kansas City and one in Sarasota. What do they like to do in their spare time? Carl enjoys golfing, fishing, and reading. Connie enjoys reading, gardening, boating, and going to the beach.

They are very enthusiastic about Plymouth Harbor! They are impressed by the helpfulness of the staff and the friendliness of the residents. Go out of your way to meet them; you will be happy you did!

 

Judy Liersch had a colorful childhood, growing up in Montréal with her parents and two younger sisters. As the second largest French-speaking city after Paris, only about 15 percent of the population was English. Judy’s family was English, but she learned to speak French and attended the same all-girls private school her mother had 25 years earlier. “We were very free and independent,” she remembers. “We grew up in a time where we could be turned loose after school and on weekends and my mother could say, ‘be back before dark.’”
 
After high school, Judy’s parents wanted her to experience life beyond Montréal and encouraged her to apply to other colleges, not only McGill University — but with one condition: no further than 500 miles away. Determined to attend a co-ed university, Judy settled on Cornell, where she majored in cultural anthropology.

During her last semester of college, Judy had a stroke of good luck on a family vacation when she met a man who was a senior manager at IBM. He told Judy to give him a call when she graduated, and she did just that, arriving at IBM’s Wall Street sales office in 1957. Trained as a Systems Service Girl, Judy wired control panels for the accounting machines used by stock brokerage firms and programmed one of the first commercial computers, the IBM Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC).

After a couple of years, Judy decided to get back to her anthropology interests. Her former academic advisor, a Japanese specialist, suggested looking into a teaching job in Japan. She applied to the Canadian Academy (a former missionary school) in Kobe but there were no openings for the upcoming school year — they suggested she try again the following year. She did, and was offered a position teaching second grade. Judy left from Seattle on an old Japanese ship with a two-week voyage ahead of her. Along the way, she befriended two other teachers heading to her school and a Japanese-Canadian artist, who became a life-long friend.

Judy arrived in Japan in 1959. Her K-12 boarding/day school served children from the international community in Kobe — Chinese, Korean, and English — all who spoke at least English and Japanese. While Judy wasn’t really fluent in Japanese, she learned enough to get by, traveling far and wide in her time there. “The exchange rate back then was 360 Yen to the dollar,” Judy says. “We would go to the Japanese Travel Bureau and ask what ryokan accommodations they had available for 500 Yen, which included dinner and breakfast. We hit a lot of the major sights like Kyoto, Shiga Kogen (skiing), Hiroshima, and the island of Kyushu.” Judy’s mother came to visit the summer after her first year in Japan.

“Years later I learned that my father had dispatched her to make sure that I came home,” she laughs. After another school year, Judy returned to New York City and worked at a small publishing firm. Not long after, she transitioned into a job at Time Inc. as a picture researcher. The catch, however, was that the position was in Time’s Montréal office. Judy gladly accepted the job with the stipulation that Time would eventually bring her back to New York. After a few years, Time made good on its promise, and Judy came back to New York as a computer programmer. Although she had experience in first generation computers, she had to be retrained in the third generation, with a unique specialty – typesetting and hyphenation.
 
“Remember that Time Magazine has very narrow columns,” Judy says. “Twenty-five percent of the lines have to be hyphenated. The computer system wasn’t very sophisticated and it had a fairly high hyphenation error rate.” So, Judy was assigned to develop an improved system that reduced the hyphenation error rate by building a dictionary of correctly hyphenated words. As a result, only new words had to be flagged in the copy editing process, improving the accuracy rate from 93 to 99 percent.
 
In 1971, Judy was accepted to Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. In a class of 300, she was one of 19 women. While there, Judy was fascinated by a new program in public management and quickly decided this was the career for her. She was later offered a job with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and after gaining her U.S. citizenship, Judy arrived in Washington, D.C., in 1973 — at the height of the Nixon Administration’s Watergate scandal and the OPEC oil crisis.

At the end of Judy’s six-year stint in Washington, she had worked in five different government offices, including OMB, the Federal Energy Office, the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Department of Energy (DOE). “I was changing offices, bosses, or programs constantly,” she says.

In 1979, the DOE had appointed a new director of its national laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The laboratory was not only hiring, but keen on hiring women managers. Judy interviewed and landed the job of Assistant Director for Government Relations. “While I had the right experience in Washington, this turned out to be a very hard job for two reasons – I was a woman and I was not a scientist,” Judy says. She stuck it out for four years and then transitioned into a line management job where she was in charge of publishing operations, the library, and museum.
 
At Los Alamos, Judy shared a wall with the Chief Financial Officer/Controller, who apparently wrote very loudly, and often, on his blackboard. One time while he was traveling, Judy decided to replace it with a white board. She left a message on it that read, “Confucius say he who have loud blackboard need quiet white board.” The CFO’s name? Allen Jennings.

Judy and Allen married in 1988. After more than 12 years living in Sante Fe and working at Los Alamos, the two retired in 1992. They returned to Washington, D.C., for three years, where they explored the city, reconnected with friends, and traveled to places like China, Egypt, Peru, and South Africa. After a few years back in New Mexico, Judy and Allen wintered in Venice, Florida, and eventually relocated full-time to Nokomis.

The couple moved into Plymouth Harbor in 2011. Today, Judy and Allen enjoy staying active in the community and spending their summers at their condo in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Judy is a longtime supporter of the Women’s Resource Center, the Sarasota Orchestra, and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. Within Plymouth Harbor, she is a member of the program and dining committees and has been actively involved with the annual Committee Fair. She and Esther Jensen also reach out to local artists and select those who exhibit in the Mezzanine Gallery.

 

Among the top reasons for moving into a Life Plan Community is a sense of security. Security, however, can take on several forms. By moving into Plymouth Harbor, residents can let go of their worries and take comfort in the fact that they will always be cared for. With helpful, friendly staff and a full continuum of care, residents know that any future needs can be provided within the community.

Furthermore, there is an increased sense of safety, freedom, and community — as residents are no longer responsible for the day-to-day demands of homeownership and are able to get to know their neighbors and engage in an abundance of new activities. Of course, there is also the added benefit of 24/7 security monitoring and security staff.

In total, Plymouth Harbor has 13 security officers, who each have first responder experience in a variety of different backgrounds —including law enforcement, military, and general security. In fact, combined experience in the security department here at Plymouth Harbor is more than 275 years. On any given day, there are three security personnel on campus during the day shift, and two during the second and third shifts. Throughout the entire campus, there are over 40 security cameras, with plans to install several additional cameras after the completion of the Northwest Garden Building.

While you may see and know many members of the security team, there is much that goes on behind the scenes. During each shift, security staff provide mobile and foot patrol of the campus; respond to alarms; aid with resident/guest assistance; assist in parking; provide shuttle service; guard against theft; maintain overall security; and write reports of daily activities and irregularities, such as equipment or property damage, theft, trespassers, or unusual occurrences. The Front Desk also aids in the security process by facilitating calls and serving as campus watch, keeping a close eye on all closed-circuit security cameras.

What sets Plymouth Harbor’s security team apart? According to Lyall Smith, Director of Concierge and Security Services, their willingness to go the extra mile, cooperating with all other departments. “Oftentimes, security staff are the only ones on campus after hours to assist with numerous requests, from simple to complex challenges,” he adds. “Plymouth Harbor is a ‘mini city,’ which creates similar demands of our security officers as they are the first responders on duty.”

By: Becky Pazkowski

The grief of losing someone near and dear to us is very personal. Comfort may come in a variety of forms. When my mother died at age 73 (way too soon, in my mind), I struggled with doing something meaningful and positive at a time when I wasn’t feeling too positive. Since her illness was very rare, I couldn’t make a donation to support research into it, as there wasn’t really an organization that did that. What I, and others, settled on was a non-profit that she gave to throughout her lifetime. Somehow, through making a donation in her memory to an organization that she was passionate about made sense to me, and it helped me to find some comfort with her death.

Memorial gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation have been a source of comfort to families, knowing that gifts support programs and capital projects for the good of everyone at Plymouth Harbor. In 2016 alone, over 100 memorial gifts were made, totaling more than $14,000. We put these donated dollars to work supporting programs, employee education, training, hardship cases, and many other causes. Just as I had received some comfort knowing that another’s life would be made better as a result of my mother’s death, our hope is that memorial donors find peace and solace knowing the same.

By: Becky Pazkowski

In January, we said goodbye to a longtime friend of Plymouth Harbor, Priscilla Heindel. Priscilla and her husband Dennis moved to Sarasota from Massachusetts in 1988, and into Plymouth Harbor in 1997. They were members of the First Congregational United Church of Christ in Sarasota. Dennis passed away in 2006, and in 2011 Priscilla moved to Albuquerque to be closer to family.

Priscilla has been a loyal annual donor to the Foundation, through their Donor Advised Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. We learned of her death in February and subsequently received a gift in memory of the couple. Their daughter, Kathy Kuy, has been very kind in representing Priscilla over the last few years. Priscilla spent her final years at an assisted living residence in Albuquerque. We wish to extend our sympathy to the family of Priscilla and Dennis Heindel, for the loss of their mother, and a kind thank you for the support over the years to make life at Plymouth Harbor the best it can be. We are honored to welcome our newest member to the MacNeil Society.

By: Celia Catlett

Ann Anderson radiates energy and friendliness. As with so many interviews I have conducted with new residents, the session turned into a lively conversation. As we talked, I learned that Ann, after getting her BA in English literature and philosophy from the University of Minnesota (Cum Laude), did not follow the usual job route for these majors. After her marriage to Steven, she worked briefly as a social worker in St. Paul. She told me that her work on aid to women with dependent children was an eye-opener that set her on a path from liberal Unitarian to full-fledged humanitarian. Because she herself is adopted, she welcomed an offer to work with placing children whose mothers were unable to keep them.

But this was just one step in Ann’s multifaceted life. When her children, son Bruce and daughter Liz, were born, she became a full-time mother. Once they were grown, Ann went back to school, gaining her RN (with honors) from the community college in Brazos Port, Texas, near where her husband’s career had taken them. She worked as a nurse for several years, writing a patient manual during her tenure.

The Andersons have bred, trained, and shown Rummer Run Boxers for a number of years. They no longer are able to keep any of them at home. The dogs are now cared for, shown, and bred by the Andersons’ close friends and handlers in Birmingham, Alabama. Ann’s love of the breed is evidenced by membership on the board of the American Boxer Charitable Trust. Her interest in the animal kingdom also extends to the species we see flying past our windows here at Plymouth Harbor. She is a co-founder and current board member of Sarasota’s Save Our Seabirds.

Steven Anderson also took a sharp turn from a BA in history at the University of Minnesota to the medical sales business. He worked with several pacemaker companies over the years. Fascinated by new research at the University of Alabama on freezing harvested heart valves for use in surgery, he wished to promote this breakthrough process that allowed more patients to receive implants and started his own company, CryoLife. Doctors loved the idea, but, as Ann informed me, getting financing was the hardest part. He succeeded, however, and the company flourished and now trades on the New York Stock Exchange.

The Andersons have lived in various places: Minnesota, Wisconsin, St. Petersburg, Florida, Texas, and for about 30 years in Atlanta and part-time in Sarasota—first on Bird Key and then on Longboat, where they became full-time Sarasotans and still own a house. Although only halfway moved in, Ann is eager to participate in and contribute to our community.