By: Becky Pazkowski

Personalized Music Therapy Program

The Smith Care Center has begun a new pilot program, the Personalized Music Therapy Program, which includes the use of iPods and personalized music playlists as an enjoyable therapeutic activity. The purpose of the program is to calm behaviors frequently associated with the need for antipsychotics, thus creating an alternative to the use of medication. The initial target population includes residents who are experiencing behavior and personality changes frequently associated with dementia, such as agitation and restlessness. The pilot program has been funded through gifts to the Foundation from Wendy and Jim Underwood and Laura and Joe Devore.

Leadership Development Grant Program 

We are thrilled to announce a new program: The Harry and Nancy Hobson Leadership Development Grant Program. The purpose of the grant program is to develop the leaders of tomorrow by equipping them with the training they need today, specifically in the field of aging services. Harry and Nancy’s vision is to help blossoming leaders here at Plymouth Harbor receive the coaching, training, and skills they need to become leaders of the future. The Hobsons have provided initial seed funding for the program. For more information, please contact Becky Pazkowski in the Foundation Office or Harry Hobson directly.

 

The year 1983 marked the beginning of many renovations for Plymouth Harbor. It began with Pilgrim Hall, which underwent minor renovations for a period of about six weeks. The project was made possible through generous gifts of the residents and included a new stage, carpet, chairs, and a new cooling and heating system.

In the year 1984, the Residents Long-Range Planning Committee was established. That same year, as an important part of corporate due diligence, the committee and the Board of Trustees began working on a longer-term plan for Plymouth Harbor. Out of these meetings arose an ambitious expansion and improvement program that Plymouth Harbor would complete in the coming years. Soon after Plymouth Harbor celebrated paying off the $4 million mortgage it took out in 1965, the building projects — both large and small — began.

 

 

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Over the past few issues of Harbor Light, The Continuum has featured an article that portrays a fictitious scenario of a family’s journey through our full Continuum process at Plymouth Harbor. The series is designed to provide a closer, more detailed look at our continuing care philosophy. This marks the final article in the series.

 

After mom talked it through with our family and the staff, she began working with Home Care to provide in-home health services. At that point in time, mom knew that she needed an extra hand, but like many of us would, she wanted to remain in the comfort of her own home. She still took good care of herself, but was becoming a bit forgetful and needed more help getting around. It was for these reasons that she ultimately decided to work with Home Care, rather than transition into assisted living.

Together with Home Care nurses, she developed a plan that aligned with her goals. They began coming up to the apartment to help out, and were extremely caring and personable with her. They helped mom with everyday tasks – getting from here to there, both within the apartment and Plymouth Harbor, taking medication, preparing meals, and more. In addition, they provided all of us with peace of mind, just knowing that a helping hand was there if needed.

Three years went by, and mom continued to work with Home Care. Over the years, our family grew to know the nurses extremely well. We appreciated all that they did for mom (and us) and how they always kept us informed of her goings-on. Even with the extra help, mom remained her spirited, energetic self. She kept up her social life, and always loved having our families over to her beautiful apartment.

At the end of that third year, mom (now age 90) began to slow down. She began needing more and more help, and was losing her memory at an increasing rate. She often wandered and forgot where she was, and we were all beginning to worry more about the chance of her falling. So, mom, along with the nurses, decided it was again time to discuss her options. We sat down together once more and talked about what the next step might be. After some discussion, mom decided that she was ready to move into the Smith Care Center (SCC), which offered more medical assistance and personalized care.

Shortly thereafter, Home Care contacted SCC, and began making arrangements for mom to move in. After some time, mom was able to get a single room, and in the meantime, we worked with Residential Services to ensure we had ample time to move her belongings out of her Tower apartment. They helped us to downsize, and we were then able to bring her favorite possessions into Smith Care, making her room homey and comfortable.

It didn’t take long for mom and our families to get acquainted with the new staff in SCC. Everyone was extremely patient and kind, and they made sure mom continued to have an interactive schedule. She participated in resident meetings, monthly art therapy, and birthday “bashes,” and even got her hair and nails done each week in the salon.

Mom remained in the Smith Care Center for two more years before she passed. We will never forget the many wonderful experiences she had there, and how Plymouth Harbor was there for her at every stage. We are forever thankful that mom chose to live at Plymouth Harbor — it was one of the greatest gifts she could have given us those 16 years ago when she moved in.

 

 

By: Becky Pazkowski

Congratulations to the 2015 Plymouth Harbor Foundation scholarship recipients! Thanks to the generosity of over 70 donors, we were able to award eight scholarships for a total of $14,000 this year!

 Picture1BEA DAVIS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Bea Davis was a beloved, longtime (38 years) employee of Plymouth Harbor who passed away in 2013. She was a housekeeper in the Smith Care Center when she died. This scholarship was established in her memory and is available to housekeeping staff or their children.


Recipient: Carol Bello –
$1500 Bea Davis Memorial Scholarship

Carol is the daughter of Martha Chavez, a member of the housekeeping team at Plymouth Harbor since 2013. Carol is a sophomore at Florida State University working on a degree in Social Work and Political Science. She is interested in joining the Peace Corps, and is very involved in volunteer activities at FSU, such as Relay For Life and Ronald McDonald House. She is also an intern at the State Capitol.

 

 

Picture3JANE T. SMILEY SCHOLARSHIPS

Jane T. Smiley has resided at Plymouth Harbor since 2004. From a family that encouraged academics, she graduated from Smith College with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science. She went into the business world and worked her way up from the training squad at Macy’s to assistant buyer at The New Yorker, and finally to Vice President at Burdines.  Well-educated, well-travelled, and a consummate philanthropist, Mrs. Smiley made two scholarships available this year to employees of Plymouth Harbor or their children.

Recipient: Nancy Chan – $2000 Jane T. Smiley Scholarship
Nancy Chan is a Certified Nurse Assistant working toward her LPN certification at Manatee Technical College. She has been with Plymouth Harbor for over 10 years, has been a CNA for over 17 years, and is now ready to take her career to the next level.  She feels that her years of experience as a CNA, and the understanding she has for others in need, will help her to become a wonderful nurse one day.

Recipient: Tricia Roman – $2000 Jane T. Smiley Scholarship

Tricia Roman has been part of the Plymouth Harbor housekeeping staff for two years.  She is very dedicated and motivated, and is working toward her Medical Administrative Assistant certification from Ultimate Medical Academy. She says that she has a heart to help people, especially the elderly.

 


EVELIN CORSEY SCHOLARSHIP

Picture5Evelin Corsey resided at Plymouth Harbor from 1995 until her death in 2013, at age 98. Her life was filled with show business and the arts, but her most noted contribution to the business world was her career in real estate. She was known as the “broker to the world” and had the distinction of becoming the first woman CEO in Manhattan real estate. When Evelin passed away, she left a bequest to Plymouth Harbor in her estate. With a portion of that bequest, the Evelin Corsey Scholarship was established to benefit the employees of Plymouth Harbor.


Recipient: Luis Santiago –
$1000 Evelin Corsey Scholarship

Luis has worked as a houseman in Dining Services for over 3 years. He is working toward an Associate in Science degree as a Radiology Technician at State College of Florida.  He was inspired to pursue this field when he had his own sonogram and was completely fascinated by the technology.

 

 

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JEANNETTE GEHRIE MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP

Jeannette Gehrie lived at Plymouth Harbor with her husband Charles from 2012 until her passing in October of 2014.  She was wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and musician.  Before her death, Jeannette and Charles established and endowed a music scholarship to be offered annually, in perpetuity, to Plymouth Harbor employees or their immediate family members who wish to study music.

Recipient: Paul Pazkowski – $1500 Jeannette Gehrie Music Scholarship Paul Pazkowski has been a Plymouth Harbor employee for nearly three years, most recently as an eTech; he plays guitar in the Mayflower Café twice a month. Paul is taking guitar lessons in order to expand his song selection to include more pieces from the eras of our residents.

 

We are extremely grateful to the 70+ donors whose gifts have made additional scholarships possible for our employees and their families. 

Recipient: Lekeya Butler – $2000 General Education Scholarship

Lekeya Butler is a CNA working in our Home Care department. She is a student at State College of Florida in the LPN program. Lekeya has ambitious plans for herself, as she would eventually like to earn her Nurse Practitioner degree where she would apply her skills in the field of women’s health.

Recipient: Vernicia Crenshaw – $2000 General Education Scholarship

Vernicia (Nici) Crenshaw is the daughter of Michelle Jackson, a member of our housekeeping team for over 8 years, with a total of 29 years with Plymouth Harbor. Nici herself is a member of Dining Services. She is studying to become a Radiology Ultrasound Technician at Keiser University. One of her instructors commented that she is one of the most gifted of her contemporaries.

Recipient: Sabrina Galvan Cortez – $2000 General Education Scholarship

Sabrina Cortez is a CNA in the Home Care department. She has been a CNA for 11 years, and is studying to earn her Occupational Therapy Assistant certification at State College of Florida. Sabrina has 6 children and manages to work full-time and attend school.

 

From a young age, Walt Mattson had a profound interest in the newspaper and printing business. He delivered neighborhood newspapers, and even worked as a printer’s devil (one step below an apprentice) at his uncle’s weekly newspaper business in Pittsburgh during summer vacations. In the 1950s, he landed a job at a commercial printing plant in Portland, Maine, and went on to hold several high-ranking jobs in the newspaper business. Walt quickly climbed the corporate ladder, and in 1979, he was named the president of The New York Times Company.

How did he land this prestigious title, and what got him interested in the business in the first place?

View his Critical Lense Essay Requirements admission college essay help requirements Diversity Scholarship For Minority Students In Medicine At AUA!need help in writing an academic essay for london College Essay Requirement Admission essay on love gay marriage persuasive essayYour essay can give admission officers a sense of who you are, as well as showcasing your writing skills. September Insights presentation to find out:

We provide Service Reset Lancia Thesis services by professional editors who are trained for editing academic documents including thesis and dissertations. Order our Insights is a monthly connection where residents can share stories and insights about their lives, careers, and hobbies with Plymouth Harbor employees. A feature of Plymouth Harbor’s developing employee wellness program, OnBoard Many university students ask us that can someone Best Resume Writing for me. Yes, we always available to provide unique dissertation to release your tension. Insights is offered at noon on the fourth Friday of each month. Open to all employees, lunch is provided, supported by gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation employee assistance fund. Thanks to resident Phil Starr, each  dig this Insights presentation is videotaped for viewing by employees unable to attend the live event.

http://diamondegy.com/?q=homework-help-inproper-fractions Upcoming 2015 Insights Presentations:

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Dale N. Woodling, Board of Trustees

Designated Member from First Congregational UCC Church

Dale Woodling serves on the Board of Trustees as the representative of First Congregational United Church of Christ of Sarasota, the church that founded Plymouth Harbor. He is a native of northeast Ohio and received his bachelor’s degree in Economics from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. After receiving his law degree from the University of Akron School of Law, Dale entered the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps where he served for nearly 28 years in various legal positions around the country and overseas. He also holds a master’s degree in National Resource Strategy from the National Defense University.

Dale currently serves on a number of volunteer boards in Sarasota, including the Advisory Board for the Salvation Army and the board of Orchard Place, an apartment complex for physically disabled adults. He is married to Colonel Cynthia Woodling, U.S. Army (Retired) who served with the Army Nurse Corps. They have two sons.

 

Homer B. Myers was a local Sarasota banker and a member of the First Congregational Church of Sarasota. In 1963, Homer loaned the Reverend Dr. MacNeil the funds needed to purchase Coon Key for $300,000. Prior to that, Dr. MacNeil and his small group of visionaries had only the $50 that each of them had contributed as a starter fund. “He loaned us money as if we had money,” recalled Dr. George Baughman, an early Plymouth Harbor trustee and also a member of the local church.

Homer was a large supporter of Plymouth Harbor. In addition to loaning the group funds, Homer used his ties to members of the community to help the organization succeed. Following the purchase of the land, Homer helped ensure necessary zoning changes were made through a personal connection with Sarasota City Manager, Ken Thompson — an old college friend of Homer’s. Past that, Homer went on to serve as Chairman of the Plymouth Harbor Board of Trustees, first in 1968-1969, and again from 1977 until 1986. Eventually, Homer himself became a resident of Plymouth Harbor.

 

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Over the next few issues of Harbor Light, The Continuum will feature an article that discusses the full Continuum process here at Plymouth Harbor, through the eyes of a resident’s family member. Please note that this article series is fictional, and is designed to provide a closer, more detailed look at our continuing care philosophy.

A few weeks after my mother Jane’s brief illness, she was back to her normal self. However, I couldn’t help but reflect on the reason that we chose Plymouth Harbor in the first place. Yes, she wanted an active community that fostered her independence, but also one that could be there for her when needed. My mother couldn’t say enough about the kind, caring staff in Smith Care and Home Care that helped nurture her back to health, and I, too, am forever grateful to them.

Roughly two months after her illness, mom jumped back into her active lifestyle with full force. She took up a new class in the Wellness Center, and began to work out in the community, becoming a Guardian Ad Litem and a member of the local Woman’s Club. In her time at Plymouth Harbor, she also served as a member on several resident committees. To say she kept busy would be an understatement – she had more meetings and commitments on her calendar than I did back then!

Still, elder family members and friends of my mother continued to question the idea of a retirement community. They would always ask her, “You’re so active, why would you give up your home to live there?” and “Don’t you miss your privacy?” She always laughed, and shared a story about swapping life experiences with someone in the hallway or dining room, and how easily she found comfort in her apartment when she needed some down time. As with any move, it was an adjustment for her in that first year, but after that, she loved her new home and all that came with it.

My mother remained active and flourished in her 17th floor apartment for some time. Six years after that first illness – at the age of 87 – my mother began to have some minor concerns. She would talk to us about them, and then we began to notice. Since we were now local to Sarasota, we were able to spend a lot of time with her – Sunday night dinners, holidays, birthdays, family vacations, and even just because.

My brother was able to stop in a bit more often than I could during the week because he worked downtown. During that time period, I probably saw her about three or four times a month, as my family life was getting busier.

With mom included, we were all noticing that her memory was beginning to fade — not at all to an extreme, just a couple of missed details here and there. She was also beginning to have a harder time getting around the apartment, and needed more help to get to doctor appointments or help with medication. We, of course, didn’t mind, but that led us to a discussion, and we all agreed that it would be good if someone was there to help with those things if my brother and I were both unavailable.

After talking with the staff, my mother decided that working with Home Care to provide in-home health services was the right choice for her. She could work with the nurses to develop a plan that met her goals, and they would provide the services she needed in the comfort and privacy of her own home.

Stay tuned to hear more of our fictional Jane’s story in the October issue.

 

William Woeltjen, Board of Trustees

Previously serving as interim CFO and Treasurer for Sarasota Memorial Hospital, William Woeltjen was named Chief Financial Officer in November 2010. As Chief Financial Officer, William is responsible for all financial matters related to the health care system, including financial reporting, financial planning, revenue cycle, reimbursement, debt management and managed care contracting. He has more than 25 years of experience in corporate health care finance.

Before joining Sarasota Memorial’s Finance Department in 2007, William, a Certified Public Accountant, served as corporate treasurer and corporate chief financial officer for University Community Health in Tampa. He has a bachelor’s degree in Economics and Management from Tulane University and a bachelor’s degree in Accounting, and a Master of Business Administration from the University of South Florida.

 

 

By: Becky Pazkowski

Several people have approached me recently about making a charitable gift that produces income back to the donor, or a designee of the donor. There are several ways that this can be accomplished.  One such way is through a vehicle called a Charitable Gift Annuity, and I would like to offer some details about this type of gift below.

Search for jobs related to http://babasbeans.com/american-history-x-essay/ or hire on the world's largest freelancing marketplace with 13m+ jobs. It's free to sign up and bid on jobs. A Charitable Gift Annuity provides a variety of benefits for the donor, including:

  • Guaranteed fixed income based on your age at the time of the gift
  • Tax deduction if donor itemizes
  • Some of the income may be tax-free
  • 1 or 2 people can receive the income
  • There is no fee to establish the annuity

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  • There is a $1000 minimum to establish the annuity
  • The gift is irrevocable
  • We work with the United Church of Christ (UCC), United Church Funds
  • At least 50% of the beneficiary must be a UCC affiliated organization (Plymouth Harbor is)
  • Income you receive is based on your age, the highest rate is 9.0%
  • Your gift can be made with cash or securities
  • When the annuitant dies, the remaining principal passes to the beneficiaries

 Illustration below:

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If you would like to know more about how to establish a Charitable Gift Annuity, or what rate you would receive, please feel free to contact me at beckyp@plymouthharbor.org. We can work up an illustration based on your age and other details.