By: Becky Pazkowski

The grief of losing someone near and dear to us is very personal. Comfort may come in a variety of forms. When my mother died at age 73 (way too soon, in my mind), I struggled with doing something meaningful and positive at a time when I wasn’t feeling too positive. Since her illness was very rare, I couldn’t make a donation to support research into it, as there wasn’t really an organization that did that. What I, and others, settled on was a non-profit that she gave to throughout her lifetime. Somehow, through making a donation in her memory to an organization that she was passionate about made sense to me, and it helped me to find some comfort with her death.

Memorial gifts to the Plymouth Harbor Foundation have been a source of comfort to families, knowing that gifts support programs and capital projects for the good of everyone at Plymouth Harbor. In 2016 alone, over 100 memorial gifts were made, totaling more than $14,000. We put these donated dollars to work supporting programs, employee education, training, hardship cases, and many other causes. Just as I had received some comfort knowing that another’s life would be made better as a result of my mother’s death, our hope is that memorial donors find peace and solace knowing the same.

By: Becky Pazkowski

In January, we said goodbye to a longtime friend of Plymouth Harbor, Priscilla Heindel. Priscilla and her husband Dennis moved to Sarasota from Massachusetts in 1988, and into Plymouth Harbor in 1997. They were members of the First Congregational United Church of Christ in Sarasota. Dennis passed away in 2006, and in 2011 Priscilla moved to Albuquerque to be closer to family.

Priscilla has been a loyal annual donor to the Foundation, through their Donor Advised Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. We learned of her death in February and subsequently received a gift in memory of the couple. Their daughter, Kathy Kuy, has been very kind in representing Priscilla over the last few years. Priscilla spent her final years at an assisted living residence in Albuquerque. We wish to extend our sympathy to the family of Priscilla and Dennis Heindel, for the loss of their mother, and a kind thank you for the support over the years to make life at Plymouth Harbor the best it can be. We are honored to welcome our newest member to the MacNeil Society.

By: Becky Pazkowski

In 2015, a Foundation trustee phoned a resident donor to thank her for her gift to the Foundation. During their conversation, the donor mentioned that she didn’t know a lot about the Foundation and thought that it might be nice to have a tea every now and then so that residents can ask questions and learn about the good things the Foundation is doing. Since then, nearly 60 guests have attended one of the Foundation Teas. They are small groups, typically hosted by two Foundation trustees, and held in one of the colony card rooms. If you have not come to a Foundation Tea, and are interested, please call Becky Pazkowski at Ext. 398 and we will be sure to add you to the guest list for the future.

In the January 2017 issue of Harbor Light, we introduced the Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) clinicals program from Suncoast Technical College (STC) that is partnering with our Smith Care Center. Now, we’d like to introduce STC’s Certified Nursing Assistant program, which began working with the SCC at the end of February.

This program, known as the Health Careers Program, is the first step toward a future in nursing for many students. The program works with high school juniors and seniors from schools across the county who are interested in both nursing and overall healthcare.

In their first semester, students learn about the broader spectrum of healthcare; in their second semester, they focus on nursing curriculum. During this time, students perform clinicals for the period of one month at various facilities in the area, including Plymouth Harbor — spending half the day on their school campus and the other half performing clinicals. At the completion of the program, students have the option to take the state CNA Exam. While many choose this option, others decide to further their nursing education and enroll in STC’s LPN program.

According to Clinical Instructor Linda Hart, RN, MSN, STC is the only high school program that offers training in hands-on patient care. Linda joined STC 16 years ago, and throughout the years, she has seen the program grow from three students to over 160. Today, the program has anywhere from nine to 13 students onsite with instructors. In the SCC, students are paired with a CNA, and are able to assist with items such as denture care, hair and nail care, range-of-motion exercises, meal assistance, and more. “It’s a natural fit because many of Plymouth Harbor’s nurses graduated from this program,” Linda says.

Karen Novak, SCC Director of Health Services, adds, “Care is the essence of nursing and the dominant, distinctive, and unifying feature.” She goes on to say that care is taught day-by-day by working with the novice learner. Stepping into a new environment can overwhelm anyone, but the nurses in the SCC help to guide STC’s students through their first experiences in healthcare, giving them permission to ask questions, seek out answers, and learn as much as possible in the process.

“It’s the joy of my life. This program changes our students’ lives,” Linda says. “It gives them confidence and a purpose for learning — what a gift.”

High school sweethearts Tom and Sue Elliott are originally from Toledo, Ohio. Tom graduated from Alma College with a degree in biology, and Sue graduated from the University of Toledo with a degree as a registered medical technologist. After Tom served in the Army in West Germany, the two traveled Europe before returning to the U.S. Upon their return, Sue focused on volunteer work and Tom earned his master’s degree before starting work at Applied Science Associates – where he helped build the company from three employees to over 150 when he retired.

How did he accomplish this growth? And what is the meaning behind the name of their talk?

View their February 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

With deep appreciation we recognize Tom Hopkins as he ends his second term as a trustee of the Plymouth Harbor Foundation Board of Trustees. A charter trustee of the Foundation, he was instrumental in drafting the Operating Agreement and filing the final documents to establish the Foundation in the spring of 2012. In addition to his two terms on the Foundation Board, Tom also served six years on the Board of Trustees for Plymouth Harbor, Inc. — four years as Chair.

His loyalty to the governance of Plymouth Harbor is second only to the contributions he has made over the years to help make Plymouth Harbor what it is today. His quiet and diligent leadership are impressive and have proved extremely effective. During his service, the Wellness Center was conceived, funded, and completed. The rejuvenation of Pilgrim Hall was planned, funded, and completed. He also served during the planning and groundbreaking of the Northwest Garden Building, scheduled to open late this year.

We extend a fond farewell and huge thanks to Tom Hopkins for his loyal and valuable service to The Plymouth Harbor Foundation. We will most certainly miss you.

“Tom Hopkins has definitely left his thumbprint on Plymouth Harbor, and for this we will forever be grateful,” stated Harry Hobson during a recent meeting.

At the January annual meeting of the Foundation Board, Cade Sibley was re-elected to Chair, Harry Hobson to Vice Chair, and Garry Jackson to Secretary/Treasurer. We welcome and appreciate their leadership.

The Foundation just completed its fifth year in operation. Much has been accomplished, and many lives have been positively affected. The year 2016 was our most impressive yet, with total gifts raised exceeding $3 million — $1.525 million in current gifts and $1.546 million in deferred giving. Below is a summary of the funds that benefitted from the current gifts. Please note: numbers are rounded.

Zest For Life: Capital Projects $ 1,258,130
Resident Assistance $ 1,450
Zest For Life: Programs $ 18,970
General – Unrestricted $ 155,221
Employee Assistance $ 91,700

Deferred giving in 2016 was equally as impressive, exceeding $1.5 million in intended gifts. Donors to deferred giving are those who have identified the Plymouth Harbor Foundation in their estate plans in some way, thus joining the MacNeil Society. In 2016 alone, we welcomed 13 new MacNeil Society members, bringing our total members to 39. Interest in giving to the various projects and programs of the Foundation continues to bring in new donors.

In 2016, 47% of residents, 85% of board members, and 70% of management staff participated in giving to the Foundation. We are sincerely grateful to these participants. Finally, a measurement used throughout the country in effectiveness of any philanthropy program is the amount of money it costs to raise $1. The national average is 20 cents. Our cost for 2016 was 9 cents.

You can find a complete summary of giving in our 2016 Impact Report, which will be released at the end of March. Thank you to everyone for a great year!

After receiving his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from Cornell University, Dr. Lou Newman moved to Montana and developed a veterinary practice, a wholesale drug supply business, and a cattle ranch. He later made the decision to join the faculty of Michigan State University’s Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, where he completed his Ph.D. in Veterinary Pathology. Dr. Newman went on to work with two more universities before retiring and focusing on his passion for photography.

Has he always had a desire to work with animals? And what are his surprising stories from time spent with cowboys and cattle?

View his January 2017 Insights presentation to find out:
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

“History has provided us with many examples of nurses’ contributions to mankind. But what sets us apart as a recognized profession?” asks Karen Novak, Director of Health Services. “Tradition! Florence Nightingale was a change agent and seemed to do it without compromise; leadership techniques and advocacy were many of her strong points. It is important to have these traits to
provide nursing students with the tools necessary to promote health.”

The tradition of nursing care is alive and passionate at Plymouth Harbor. Suncoast Technical College’s (STC) Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) program partnered with Plymouth Harbor’s Smith Care Center (SCC) years ago, but somehow that tradition fell through the cracks. Dedicated leadership at Plymouth Harbor decided to get things back on track, and the revival of the tradition resumed in November 2016.

STC’s LPN program is a one-year program where students gain both classroom and real-world experience — completing six months in a “freshman” course and their second six months in an advanced course. As a result, half of their time is spent honing skills in the classroom, while the other half is spent completing student clinicals at numerous healthcare sites, including Plymouth Harbor.

According to Clinical Instructor Michelle Boudreaux, there are three clinical instructors. Students rotate between healthcare facilities, allowing them to work in different environments with different instructors. Boudreaux notes that while the maximum number of students allowed by law in a class is 12, STC limits theirs to seven, ultimately providing a much more in-depth, hands-on experience.

By working in environments such as Plymouth Harbor, students are able to learn delegation, management, and can witness first-hand how facilities function as a team. At the end of each clinical rotation, students are asked to provide a “head-to-toe” assessment to their instructor, along with a Medicare note and patient history. Additionally, the students conduct a daily “post-conference” in which they discuss items that came up and how they solved them. Under supervision, students are able to perform general patient care and some skills such as IVs, dressing changes, vital signs, and patient assessments.

To succeed in nursing, a strong and broad foundation must be laid to build upon. SCC’s tenured nurses are all too happy to contribute to building this foundation, seeing these novice nursing students bloom right before their eyes. For some SCC nurses, it is a completion of the circle they started many years ago, as they, too, were in the shoes of the students not so long ago. SCC LPN, and STC graduate, Manny Flores remembers it well, and now facilitates the growth of many students as they learn.

“To touch the life of a student and give them wings to grow is our goal here at Plymouth Harbor,” Karen says. “Who knows, you might find them one day in our healthcare center taking care of you!”

During the last 37 years Myron Robinson has served as President/CEO of various Urban League affiliates around the country and is a consultant to the National Urban League in New York City. He was also a Marketing & Senior Sales Executive for AT&T. Before moving to paradise in the Sarasota area in 2009, he was an Executive-in-Residence at the School of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University.

Myron has had a multi-faceted volunteer career. He served on numerous boards in Cleveland including John Carroll University, Key Bank and University Hospitals. He is past Chair of the Board of Directors of Doctors Hospital here in Sarasota and is serving on the Manatee County Library Board and the Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce. Myron has been a member of the First Congregational United Church of Christ for seven years. He has served as a Deacon, Vice Moderator, Moderator, and Past Moderator of the Church Council. He is married to Brenda K. Robinson, a mixed-media artist. They have two adult children and four grandchildren.

“I have a passionate interest in continuing the long, productive relationship with First Congregational United Church of Christ and to further developing strategies to diversify Plymouth Harbor.”