By Sallie van Arsdale

A cormorant splashes down beside my kayak.  It swims alongside and is so close I could touch the wet, black feathers.  Its eyes are blue-green, its beak orange tipped with a hook.  Quickly it dives under the boat.  Surfacing on the other side, it is again within reach. 

Only recently have we been favored with this friendly behavior.  There is, of course, an explanation; the cormorant is fishing.  We are in shallow water on a sunny day.  Our kayaks cast shadows which seem to help the birds see their small darting prey.  Apparently, too, cormorants have learned that kayaks are harmless.  They see them nearly every day in the bay off Plymouth Harbor so familiarity has overcome fear, at least for the local, winged divers. 

Although cormorants are experts at fishing, a successful catch can take many tries.  Once it occurs, to see a bird with a beak full carefully maneuver its captured prize into swallowing position and gulp it down is fascinating.  One is tempted to call out, “Congratulations!” despite the fate of the fish. 

Cormorants have to be accomplished underwater swimmers to survive.  Wide, webbed feel propel their streamlined bodies through speedy twists and turns in pursuit of their agile food source.  As a good example of double use, the same feet serve as flying brakes.  When a cormorant on the wing comes in for a water landing, each wide-spread foot is thrust out in front to hit the water first and slow forward motion.  The technique works perfectly and is fun to watch, especially when the splashdown is next to you. 

Our cormorant encounters are a continuing pleasure—even a privilege.  After all, how often does one share, if just for seconds, a degree of closeness with a wild creature?

Photos courtesy of Lou Newman

In 1972, Beaulah Gaither and her husband Bob were proud to be working at Plymouth Harbor. It was the glamorous retirement community built in 1967 whose striking tower, the city’s tallest building, sat right on the shore of Sarasota Bay.  “It was a real nice place and we enjoyed the residents,” says Beualah who celebrated her own retirement at the end of March 2013 after 39 years of service. 

She and her husband Bob worked in housekeeping together until Bob retired after 37 years. During that time their work at Plymouth Harbor had become a family affair.  All three of their daughters as well as their son worked there when they came of age.  The entire family pulled together and all four children graduated from college and are enjoying successful careers. The daughters manage medical practices and the son owns his own mechanic shop. Beaulah and Bob can be proud of these many accomplishments.

Jim Myers, their supervisor for 25 of those years, knew the entire family well. According to his stories, they were an important thread in the fabric of life for their co-workers and the residents they served. From all reports, Beaulah always has a smile, rarely a complaint, and is quick to help out someone who needed a boost.

Resident Joan Runge knew Beaulah not as a housekeeper, but as one of her best customers at the Fund Shop.  “She was always stopping in to buy something pretty for one of her ‘babies’,” says Joan. One might ask if she meant one of her five children, grandchildren, or even one of her co-workers who seemed to call Beaulah “Mama.” 

At her retirement celebration on April 1, friends, co-workers, and residents gathered to honor “Mama” and speak to the many ways in which Beaulah enriched the lives of everyone at Plymouth Harbor for nearly four decades. Many friends who had already retired or that were not scheduled to work that day came in just to say good-bye. That is how special a lady she was to so many.  

Harry Hobson, Plymouth Harbor’s CEO, surely appreciated her service but was concerned, he said, with a projected decline in income from the Fund Shop after Beaulah’s retirement.  Of course this was all in jest, but Harry did point out that her husband Bob had told him that at the end of every day as he waited outside in his car to drive her home he asked himself, “What WILL she bring home today from the Fund Shop?”  According to Bob, they used to have a garage that echoed. Now he can barely park the car in it. LOL!

At this farewell party Beaulah was showered with well wishes, a basket of goodies, a big bouquet of roses and a certificate for a special weekend retreat at the Lido Beach Resort. She also was able to go home with a large photo of Plymouth Harbor filled with loving messages from her many admirers.

Thank you, Beaulah Gaither, for your many years of hard work, generous service, and loving kindness.

get link A Zest for Life Profile

Phil Starr was introduced to dancing when he was 16 years old, by his wise mother. He suspects that her motivation was to ensure she always had a dance partner. However, in her infinite wisdom she raised a young man who would make his dancing-inclined wife very happy one day.

Phil and Barry Starr

Phil and Barry Starr

That day came 55 years ago in 1958 when Phil was asked to teach his younger brother and his fiancé how to cha cha before their wedding in 1959. Friends–and their girlfriends–also wanted to learn, which left Phil the only person in the group without a partner. A friend’s younger sister, Barry, was asked to be Phil’s blind date. Even though Barry brought to the dance lesson her college roommates, she was the one who had the dance talent who caught Phil’s eye, and his heart.

Phil’s father was active in insuring the Ringling Brothers’ Circus, which required frequent trips to Sarasota and on one trip he acquired several homes on Longboat Key as an investment.

Phil and Barry danced their way through the courtship and Phil popped the question while attending a chaperoned house party at his parent’s home on Longboat Key.

After their marriage in 1960 Phil and Barry lived an active life in their Kansas City community, participating in their childrens’ school, their church, and the Boy Scouts. Phil was awarded the Silver Antelope, the highest volunteer award given by the Regional Board of the Boy Scouts of America. As an Eagle Scout Phil enrolled his sons in the Boy Scouts when they reached the proper age, and both sons and three grandsons also became Eagle Scouts.

Life happened, their children grew, and they began to find other ways to share their love of dancing. They started teaching foxtrot, waltz, tango, rhumba, and swing to a group of 10 friends in their basement. What started as a small group ended up as a group of 30. They added sizzle to the experience by capping off a 10-week course with a black tie dance party with live music at their country club.

Phil and Barry Starr ready for a dance competition.

Phil and Barry Starr ready for a dance competition.

In 1982, after a severe bout of pneumonia, Phil and Barry followed doctor’s orders of sunshine and relaxation by spending a month at the beachfront home of his parents on Longboat Key. After their return to Kansas City they enrolled in serious dance classes with a professional dance teacher couple John and Diana Berry. Lessons three times a week gave them plenty of exercise and eventually they entered dance competitions around the United States including the Sam Sodano’s Ohio Star Ball made famous by the annual PBS TV show. At one point they were coached by an English ballroom champion when he visited the Berry Dance Studio in Kansas City.

Phil retired in 1991 and he and Barry changed their legal residence to Longboat Key Florida in 2000. When friends moved into a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) in 2011, they were urged to do the same. Although they didn’t think they were ready for such a place, their minds changed when they met current residents and sampled the many programs at Plymouth Harbor. They took the plunge. And “we haven’t looked back” says Phil. There is more to do, but freedom to do nothing, and the food is like eating on a cruise ship–all you need and then even more.

Of course their activity is not confined to within the campus of Plymouth Harbor. The Starrs enjoy dining at Euphemia Haye on Longboat Key, the Salty Dog on New Pass, and Andrea’s on Siesta Road. They make it a point to visit Mote Marine Aquarium as well as to attend the ballet, the opera, and the symphony–all very close to Plymouth Harbor.

Art is a particular interest of theirs as they are avid collectors of glass sculptures–and we don’t mean just nice paperweights. They have become acquainted with and have collected work by some of the most renowned glass artists of our time. Their apartment is beautifully designed to show off each work of art and they enthusiastically share the story behind each treasure with joy.

Two of the Starr's beloved glass sculptures.

Two of the Starr's beloved glass sculptures.

The Starrs say they couldn’t be happier with their lives at Plymouth Harbor. They are looking forward to more dancing opportunities in the near future as a new dance floor is planned for the updated Wellness Center and funds are being donated to buy a portable dance floor for various locations, including the dining room and the outside pool area. All this dancing must be modified as Barry had two back surgeries, which have disturbed her sense of balance. But dancing skills, like riding a bicycle, aren’t easily forgotten. Phil and Barry believe dancing is a good exercise activity and they hope to participate fully.

On Thursday evening, March 28th, four illustrious “Aging Industry” leaders presented a panel discussion on “The Art of Aging” to the toughest audience imaginable—residents of Plymouth Harbor.  One might assume that if anyone knows something about the “art” of aging with dignity, courage and panache, you would find them here.

Undaunted, Dr. Nancy Schlossberg, a nationally renowned scholar and author of numerous books on aging and retirement, and three panelists shared their well-considered thoughts with each other and the audience gathered before them.

The opening question, “It has been said that demographics are destiny.  How does that apply to Sarasota?” was fielded first by Tom Esselman, the Executive Director of Sarasota’s Institute for the Ages.

Art of Aging Industry Experts at Plymouth Harbor

Harry Hobson, Nancy Schlossberg, Tom Esselman & John Overton

Pointing to the demographic reality that gives Sarasota County the distinction of having the oldest average population of any large county in the U.S., Tom declared, “Our destiny is leadership.  As the world wonders what it will face in the future with the dramatic growth of an aging population, we are experiencing that future now.  Our destiny is to embrace new ideas and provide lessons of learning and leadership.”

John Overton, CEO of The Pines of Sarasota, chose to reflect on the demographics of dementia that he sees as a leader of a skilled nursing residence.  “Our challenge is to demonstrate the leadership learning about the disease, examining the lessons of the last 20 years and seeking innovative ways of providing care in the home for this growing population.”

“Appreciating the Mecca of older adults that we are,” reflected our own Harry Hobson, “we are truly a microcosm of the future of our country.  We will be challenged for some time with dementia, and we are called to emphasize preventative health care and wellness.”

When asked, “What do you see as the hot button issues around aging?”  John Overton pointed quickly to a difficult dilemma.  There is the need to care for more people who are acutely ill and have outlived their income, while at the same time funding, such as Medicare and Medicaid, is increasingly restricted.  His was a call for more access to care.

Harry noted the shift of language from “care for the rest of life” to “aging in place” saying that the challenge is having access to the new technologies that enhance our lives as we age.  “The question is ‘How will we bring affordable technology to a caring bedside manner?’.  It’s a matter of aging in the ‘right’ place,” he added.

“Business and industry are too often seen as the bad guys,” said Tom Esselman, who wants to change that dialog around aging to encourage businesses to tap into the value of older adults to drive innovation.  This is an area of great promise and opportunity.

The panel went on to discuss their observations of age bias, the marginalization of older adults and whether or not we all get happier with age.  It was clear that bias and marginalization exist, but are muted in the vibrant senior-centric community of Sarasota.  Local philanthropies benefit from senior volunteers and there is great intergenerational value in the active involvement of retirees on many levels.  The Institute of the Ages is mobilizing older adults for meaningful involvement with research and product testing to support businesses developing new technologies.

Nancy Schlossberg pointed out that the Stanford Longevity Institute, AARP and Pew Research all have data showing that happiness increases as you age in the seventies and eighties.  Is it true?  For the most part, yes, they all agreed.  John Overton mused that many centenarians he knows are very happy.

“The human spirit is amazing in its capacity to find silver linings,” Tom quoted Hugh Downs.

Harry added, “There are many moving parts to aging and being happy.  The two most important factors are physical health and financial health.  I’ve seen that staying connected is a huge factor.”

Many in the audience agreed that optimism and actively reaching out to others were of great importance to them.  Some questioned age bias in employment and expressed some frustration with keeping up with the constant changing technologies around us.  There was obviously energy to continue these conversations for some time into the future, be we can focus on the panelists’ concluding statements about aging.

Essay Paper Help - why i must do my homework essay High quality affordable Custom expository essay ghostwriter websites for phd Harry Hobson — “Embrace it.  Let go of frustration.  Welcome new ways.”

 Tom Esselman — Quoting the title of a favorite song by artist Jesus Jones, “Right Here, Right Now, There’s No Place I’d Rather Be.”  Or simply, “There’s no better place than Sarasota.”

Clicking Here  John Overton — “Life is not a dress rehearsal.  Experience it now.  Live it now.”

And one last word from Art Linkletter, “Things turn out best for people who make the best of the ways things turn out.”

The “Art of Aging” panel discussion was also the featured program at the Tiger Bay Luncheon on Monday, April 11 at Michael’s on East.   

A Zest for Life Profile

Lest you ever suspect that selling your home and moving to a retirement community like Plymouth Harbor means that life is slowing down, have a chat with Peggy and Don Wallace. A report on their daily activities and active work in the community would leave a 50-year old youngster breathless.  And that’s exactly what happened when I joined them for lunch recently in the Mayflower Dining Room.

From the moment we sat down, they were bubbling with all the reasons they cherish living in the Plymouth Harbor community. But first things first, Peggy and I ordered the seafood wrap while Don ordered a cheeseburger with gusto before we all bolted for the salad bar, one of the best in Sarasota.

We sat down with salad plates heaping and I quickly learned that Peggy and Don had not intended to move into Plymouth Harbor when they did.

“We put our name on a waiting list saying we wouldn’t be ready for another 2-3 years,” said Don.  But when they got a call three months later with the news that a southwest facing apartment on the 12th floor of the tower was available immediately, they put their home on the market and packed their things.  Although it took a year to sell their house just when the marketing dipped, he beamed, “We never regretted it and never looked back.”

In fact, they never missed a beat keeping up with their outside circle of friends and find themselves even more involved in activities than when they had their home on Siesta Key. They keep physically fit by working with Michael in the gym at least twice a week.  Peggy serves on the Library Committee and is getting ready to participate in the project of redecorating their colony common area.  Don is active with the Programming Committee.

Pre Written Essays For Sale is a reliable and popular way to keep your grades safe and deadlines met. Make your order now and let us help you. “There is so much to do at Plymouth Harbor,” Peggy points out. “If you aren’t active, then you must not want to be!”

Together they are a power couple providing a real professional touch to the annual Plymouth Harbor Players theatrical production. Don is still an active member of the Directors and Writers guilds of America, but doesn’t get paid scale for writing the play for this group of amateur resident thespians.  For the past three years he has written and directed the production.  Peggy had been his stage manager until this most recent production when she was cast in a leading role.

Zest for Life at Plymouth HarborNearly two months of rehearsals for this annual production are an all-consuming business, especially with pros like Don and Peggy at the helm. That professional polish is the result of a life spent in the entertainment business in LA and New York.  Don wrote, directed and produced soap operas such as “The Edge of Night,” “One Life to Live” and “All My Children.”  He was nominated for three Emmy awards for three different episodes of “One Life to Live” and won a Writer’s Guild of America award for an episode of “One Life to Live.”

Both Don and Peggy are musicians; she’s a singer and he’s a horn player.  They sing in the choir at the First Congregational Church and attend the Sarasota Orchestra concerts regularly.  It was great fun to talk about his experiences conducting choirs and our respective views on whether to sing Brahms’ German Requiem in English or the original German.  We could have talked the rest of the afternoon, but not with their busy schedules!

One of their sons lives here in Sarasota, another visited just last month and their granddaughter had just left the day before our meeting after a week’s visit.  Their family enjoys staying at the Lido Beach Resort where Plymouth Harbor residents benefit from a discount rate even during the height of season.

Peggy says that one of the most important factors that make her busy life manageable is the care and attention of all the staff at Plymouth Harbor.  “They take away the little hassles of living,” she shared.  Well, when you are as busy as Don and Peggy involved in activities that feed mind, body and soul, you need every minute you can get for yourself!

By Chris Valuck

Plymouth Harbor CCRC Wellness CenterWith the Board of Trustees’ approval to move forward on the Wellness Center Project, the architectural firm THW Design has been retained and designs are now being prepared to transform the southwest corridor of the ground level of the tower which is the current location of all group classes and now referred to as the “club level.”  Offering something for everyone, the Wellness Center will nurture mind and body by providing opportunity for creative pursuits such as woodworking and art, as well as the physical and social experience of group fitness and after-class socializing.  The Spa will be relocated to the club level to provide massage therapy and facials.

The design of the space will be ‘open concept,’ with windows replacing most of the southwest walls to take advantage of the beautiful waterfront views.  Although the design is open concept, the art studio, woodworking, and the group fitness rooms will be private spaces off the main hub of the center, but still with the ability to appreciate nature through windowed walls.  The art studio will be self-contained with individual studio tables and lockers, as well as an area for art classes.  The woodworking studio will also be part of the design with a designated space.  The Spa will be more easily accessible once relocated to the Wellness Center.  A recreation space is also planned for socializing and interactive sports, i.e., Wii.  The group fitness room will have sound suppression walls, mirrored walls, and hard-surface floors to accommodate many different types of group classes as well as dancing, from line dancing to ballroom.  The cardiovascular and resistance training space will include state-of-the-art equipment such as Nu-steps, elliptical, recumbent bikes, and pneumatic resistance training machines.

Good news!  An additional staff person will be present on the floor to assist residents with orientations to the new equipment, as well as teaching additional group fitness classes.

The young man in t-shirt and shorts spoke clearly and intelligently about “The Game of Life,” a cellular automation or mathematical simulation created by British mathematician John Conway in 1970.  On the screen behind him was a running example of the cells of the simulation replicating, dying and regenerating its own patterns in an endless loop.

Eric (Aaron) Meister is a student at New College of Florida, where highly gifted students with a streak of independence and free spirits are encouraged to achieve excellence by following their own passions to graduation. Eric is also a member of the first group of New College Student Fellows participating in a group independent study project that has challenged students to develop speaking and presentation skills commensurate with the critical thinking, critical reading and analytical skills they were developing in their coursework.

Standing before his first live audience of strangers, Eric connected with a number of Plymouth Harbor residents gathered that afternoon in Pilgrim Hall and he was not alone. With him this afternoon were several of his classmates who were also there to make their first presentations.

 Dr. John Gillette, Director of the New College Writing Center, has worked closely with the students during 4 weeks of intensive speech presentation training in both theory and practice as they practiced delivering speeches upon topics of their chosen discipline of study. Each one had the desire to learn how to communicate their work and interests in an effective way to future employers, future colleagues and to the public. Demi Brown presented the case for developing a better system of training doctors to offer pain management prescription that reduces the risk of pain killer addiction so rampant in Florida. Her presentation had the polish that she will need as a future policy maker and legislator. Anna Kresek told the story of the nearly lost Gnostic gospel of Thomas, while Nisha Hodge answered what killed the electric car. Keilar Durant, an aspiring addictions counselor, explored alcohol in the college culture and Brigit Csiki presented Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Katie Cottrell talked about nanotechnology and we learned that New College is one of the few undergraduate institutions equipped with an Optical Spectroscopy and Nano-Materials Lab.

When all the students had spoken, the Plymouth Harbor residents were quick to speak up themselves.  Obviously impressed by the presentations, several residents applauded their efforts and bravery. Bobbie Sanderson was the first to express her gratitude, but she pointed out specifically that their eye contact was excellent and their passion for their subjects came through perfectly.  Others offered constructive feedback on stage movement and use of the microphone, which is another very important aspect of the New College Student Fellows mission.

It seems very fitting that Plymouth Harbor was the first community presentation partner for the Fellows. Our residents have deep experience and clear understanding of what it takes to be successful in one’s life and career.  As resident Carl Denney pointed out, learning how to speak and present is a critical skill, no matter what your professional field or career.

The students will be back on campus giving their presentations in Pilgrim Hall on April 9.

It is certainly a partnership that would make the founder of Plymouth Harbor very happy. Before he made his dream of Plymouth Harbor a reality, Congregational minister Rev. Dr. John Whitney MacNeil, was instrumental in gaining the support of the national Congregational Church in 1960 to create New College.  The connection?  Whatever their stage in life, New College students and Plymouth Harbor residents are intelligent, curious and actively engaged.

David Houle, Plymouth Harbor, Senior living communityYou can read his bio, short, sweet and high-impact, on Oprah.com. It says, “David Houle is an award-winning futurist and strategist who has launched successful brands and is an in-demand speaker about the future. He writes the popular futurist blog Evolution Shift and lives his life slightly ahead of the curve.

On his own website, you can browse through a timeline of forecasts that illustrate his on-target futurist thinking as well as his speaking schedule across the globe. And then you can wander onto one of his YouTube channels and get lost in the forest of videos, each one more intriguing than the next.

You might wonder why all of us at Plymouth Harbor feel so proud of David Houle and his success as one of the world’s top ranked futurists and futurist keynote speakers on the world stage.  Well, he’s part of our family.

David’s parents, Bettie and Cyril Houle lived here at Plymouth Harbor from 1987 through 2000 and he visited many times during those years.   And this affiliation ran in the family even earlier as David’s aunt, Hazel Stevens moved into Plymouth Harbor in 1966 and was here for nearly 30 years.

Recently, David has been serving as a Futurist-in-Residence and guest lecturer at the Ringling College of Art + Design and took the opportunity to come visit with us. We talked about his family’s history in Sarasota – his grandfather had helped John Ringling with his development efforts and his father Cyril used to hide away in the old clock tower downtown on the bay front to read books in peace.  You have to smile when thinking of that image.  When Cyril and Bettie moved into Plymouth Harbor, they became instrumental in establishing the Library on the Mezzanine with their gifts of time and funding.  He thought everyone should have the luxury of reading books in peace on the bay front.

David himself grew up in Chicago and experienced over 20 successful years in media and entertainment earning many awards and accolades.  Then he turned to the future and has been speaking about the future for 7 years now. His influential first book The Shift Age was published in 2008 and his second book, Shift Ed: A Call to Action for Transforming K-12 Education, written with Jeff Cobb was published in March 2011. The New Health Age: the Future of Health Care in America, co-authored with Jonathan Fleece, was published by Sourcebooks in January 2012.

His attention at the moment is on his latest book, “Entering the Shift Age” just published by Sourcebooks in January of 2013.  Residents and our Harbor Club members will have the opportunity to learn about the dynamics of this new Shift Age with David Houle in person at the Foundation Forum on Monday, March 25 at 3:00 p.m. in Pilgrim Hall.  He will lead us in a dynamic discussion on our entering the Shift Age, a time of transformation and change. The Foundation Forum is hosted by The Plymouth Harbor Foundation.

To quote from the introduction to his newest book:

David Houle, author, Entering the Shift Age, at Plymouth HarborThis will be one of the most transformative times in history. In the past, man-made developments like tools, machines, and technology defined an age. Today, Houle argues that our own power of conscious connection will fuel the speed of change so much that change itself will become the norm. In this eye-opening and thought-provoking book, Houle identifies and explains the key forces that have shaped our lives thus far—from business to technology to the environment—and how they will continue to affect your world for the next twenty years. Entering the Shift Age is your crucial roadmap to the future.

Are you ready to stretch your perspective far into the future? 

Henry and Janet Jacobs

It’s never too late for love!  New residents Henry and Janet Jacobs proved it when they were married onFebruary 11, 2013, in Plymouth Harbor’s MacNeil Chapel.

The newlyweds first became acquainted 35 years ago when they were both members of the ‘Swedish Walking Club’ in Maryland.  Janet lived in Timonium and Henry resided in nearby Towson.

Years passed and their lives converged again about 25 years later.  According to Janet, “things got a little more serious” between them during the past couple years.  They decided to marry and Henry made all of the arrangements in just seven days.  He said, “There was never any question as to where we’d have the wedding; the chapel is beautiful!”

Twenty-six guests joined the happy couple — friends and family from Michigan as well as several cities throughout Florida.  Henry’s 18-month old great-great niece, Reese Rose, served as flower girl.  The ceremony was followed by a dinner in the private dining room.

 

The Spirit of Philanthropy Series by Becky Pazkowski, Vice President of Philanthropy
March 2013

All projects begin with an idea, and that idea typically grows out of a passion that an individual has for something.  For Joanne Hastings, that passion is wellness.

Late in 2011, Joanne approached Harry Hobson regarding her interest in taking the wellness center to the next level.  That “next level” included an expanded fitness area and a group exercise area that would also accommodate a dance studio.  Joanne had previously lived in communities where wellness was prominent and central to the life of the residents.  Also integral to her life were dance lessons, which she mentioned offers an alternative form of exercise with similar benefits to an individual work-out.   Not only was she interested in seeing the program grow, she was also interested in funding a portion of it.

Sharing her vision and her passion, she and Harry went to work on what the possibilities were and how they would be accomplished.  Over the next year many discussions ensued.  Eventually, the project was estimated at $1,000,000 with an additional $150,000 in equipment.  Preliminary conceptual drawings were done by THW Design in Atlanta, and they were shared with Joanne.

After seeing the project start to come alive, and sharing her own ideas about design and color from her professional interior design background, Joanne offered a gift of $300,000 towards the project.  This amount was extremely generous, and we are very grateful and pleased that Joanne’s spirit of philanthropy, combined with proper planning, would culminate in bringing a much needed program to our current and future residents at Plymouth Harbor.  In recognition of her generosity, two rooms will bear Joanne’s name:  the fitness center and the group exercise/dance studio.

Thank you so much, Joanne Hastings, for bringing your passion and philanthropic spirit to Plymouth Harbor!

The Campaign

Over the months, we were able to share this project and its funding needs with individuals who showed a similar interest.  A previous bequest from the Estate of Peggy Bates (former resident of Plymouth Harbor, was also able to be directed to the project.

Plymouth Harbor Wellness Capital CampaignWith the seed already planted by Joanne, the funding began to grow and is now over $867,000 towards the $1,000,000 for the renovation.  A full list of donors to the project is below.  Finding ourselves with more than 85% of the funding complete for the renovation, we approached our Foundation Board of Trustees who approved our first ever, formal capital campaign effort for Plymouth Harbor!  We are seeking an additional $133,000 for renovations, and $150,000 for equipment, to complete the campaign. 

This is a phenomenal project, made possible by phenomenal people.  If you would like to be part of this very exciting, and important project, please contact me at the Foundation Office (Ext. 398), and we can talk about ways in which you could be involved.  Every gift is important and appreciated!

The Donors – Representing $867,000
Estate of Dr. Peggy Bates
Jack Denison
Joe and Laura Devore
John and Alita DeJongh*
Tom Elkind (in memory of Stuart S. and Barbara R. Elkind)*
Suzanne Freund
Joanne Hastings*
Harry and Nancy Hobson
Garry Jackson
Cynthia Lichtenstein and Charles Miller
Gordon and Arlene Okawa
Becky and Paul Pazkowski
Dinah Stamp
Sandy Taylor
Tom Towler and Nancy Lyon
Tena and Tom Wilson

*Represent gifts with associated naming opportunities.