By: Chris Valuck, Wellness Director

Are you finding that tasks such as opening jars, turning doorknobs, using a key or even opening a package are becoming increasingly difficult to perform? Then you may benefit from including the following hand-strengthening exercises into your weekly routine to help improve your grip strength and range of motion.

First, let’s talk about the main types of grips you’ll be enhancing. The crush grip is used when holding or closing your hand around an object. The pinch grip is used to hold an object with just your fingertips or pinching something together (i.e. holding a pen). The support grip uses your finger and thumb muscles, allowing you to hold on to things for a long time, such as a dumbbell in an exercise class. Finally, although not a “grip,” a hand extension works the opposing muscles to the flexors to help maintain muscle balance and stability between the two groups. Using simple pieces of equipment, or none at all, you can improve the strength of these important muscles. There are numerous hand exercises, a few are listed below. Let’s begin with exercises that require no equipment.

Fist to Open Fingers
Make a tight fist, then open your hand fully and spread your fingers. Repeat 3-5 times on each hand.

Open Hand Finger Lift
Place your open hand palm down on a flat surface. Begin lifting each finger up off the surface, one at a time. Then, keeping your palm on the surface, lift all fingers at once. Repeat 3-5 times on each hand.

Thumb and Finger Touch
Hold your open hand in front of you and begin touching your thumb with one finger at a time. When you have touched each finger, go in the reverse order on the same hand. Repeat this 3 times, then perform the exercise on the other hand. For an added challenge, try performing the exercise on both hands at the same time. For variety and challenge, you may choose to use equipment for your exercises, such as a small hand exercise ball, a tennis ball (if possible, cut in half so it will be easier to use), and a simple rubber band.

Rubber Band Hand Extensions
Place the rubber band around your fingers and thumb. Keeping your fingers straight, open your hand by spreading your fingers apart; then allow them to close again. Repeat this exercise for 3-5 times on each hand.

Tennis Ball (or Exer-ball) Crush
Place the ball in the palm of your hand, close your hand, and squeeze (crush) the ball for several seconds, release, and repeat a 3-5 times in each hand.

Ball Pinch
Hold the ball with only your fingertips and thumb. Now pinch the ball, hold a few seconds, and release. Repeat this 3-5 times on each hand. You might also try pinching the ball with one finger and thumb at a time. Complete this exercise on both hands.

Master these exercises, and you will see improved hand strength and flexibility. If you are interested in additional hand strengthening exercises, please contact Chris Valuck at Ext 377.

 

Brain training is thought to go a long way in slowing the aging process. What exactly is brain training? Essentially, it means incorporating mental exercises that focus on the brain’s neuroplasticity (or ability to change and adapt) in your daily lifestyle. A new concept in neuroplasticity is being seen in combining physical and mental exercises to ultimately strengthen brain power over time.

We are able to increase our brain’s neuroplasticity at any time, simply by engaging in new activities and learning new skills. This new concept takes it one step further, combining our physical and mental exercises all at once.

For instance, working on a mind game such as Sudoku helps exercise the brain’s mathematical functions. However, research suggests that long-term benefits in the brain occur when there are multiple movements (Biscontini 2016). So, while you finish your game of Sudoku, consider performing a seated march in place. Another good example is trying to solve a moderately-complex math problem (without any paper) while exercising or walking. If you stop to let yourself think, you’ll notice that it becomes much easier and more comfortable to concentrate. However, this interferes with neuroplasticity training. The key is that any additional movement while performing a mental task is beneficial, no matter how big or small.

The separate benefits of physical and mental exercise on long-term brain health have been well-established. Over the years, we’ve learned more and more that mental stimulation (like crossword puzzles), aerobic exercise, and an active social life altogether contribute to an active brain. By combining neuroplasticity training with physical movement, studies show we can strengthen,
improve, and even change certain regions in the brain (Reynolds 2009). This is because you are training your brain to function in new and different ways while operating simultaneously with your body’s needs.

There are many ways to combine mental and physical exercise in brain training. Understand tasks your mind can accomplish while your body is in motion, and take control of your brain training.

Sources:
Biscontini, L. (2016, March). Fight Aging With Brain Training. Retrieved January 26, 2017, http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/fight-aging-with-brain-training

Reynolds, G. (2009, September 15). Phys Ed: What Sort of Exercise Can Make You Smarter? Retrieved January 26, 2017. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/16/what-sort-of-exercise-can-make-you-smarter/

picture2-9Originally from Peru, Lucy Guzman came to the United States in 2008. In Peru, Lucy was both a nurse technician and massage therapist; however, her credentials did not transfer along with her move.

“I came here with a lot of dreams and goals to reach,” Lucy says of her move to the U.S. Once here, Lucy set to work, not only to learn how to speak English, but also to earn her certification as a Certified Nursing Assistant. In November 2010, she joined the Smith Care Center (SCC) team as a full-time staff member and has been here ever since.

Lucy moved to Sarasota with the youngest of her two sons, while her oldest still lives in Peru with his family. She always intended to go back to school to receive her license as a massage therapist in the U.S., and in 2014, with the help of a scholarship from the Plymouth Harbor Foundation, she did. On February 20, 2015, Lucy graduated from the Sarasota School of Massage Therapy, and eight days later, she passed her Boards to become a Licensed Massage Therapist. She accomplished all of this while still working full-time in SCC.

Today, Lucy continues her work here as a CNA, works part-time as a Massage Therapist, and also has a massage studio at her home. The Wellness Center offers complimentary chair massages each week, and Lucy is one of two massage therapists, onsite on Wednesdays from 9:30-11:30 a.m.

One of massage therapy’s obvious benefits is relaxation, but it also offers improved range of motion, flexibility and circulation, and decreased stress and anxiety. Lucy adds that her background in nursing helps her a great deal in the field of massage, knowing the ins and outs of the nervous system and the different muscle groups, and using that knowledge to maximize both the experience and health benefit for her clients.

“Lucky me,” Lucy says. “I have a job that I love and I have massage — something else I get to do because I love it, and I love helping people.”

To learn more, stop by the Wellness Center on Wednesday mornings, or find Lucy’s information in the Wellness Center’s Preferred Professionals Brochure.

 

picture1-9The phrase coined for our 50th anniversary stated, Plymouth Harbor celebrates our past and envisions our future.

January 15, 2017, will mark Plymouth Harbor’s 51st year — as we look back, we thank our founder, The Rev. Dr. John Whitney MacNeil, and our many supporters: employees, residents, their families, board members, donors, and members of the community. We also look to the future, seeking ways to innovate and improve for both current and future residents, who we hope will enjoy Plymouth Harbor for more than 50 years to come.

The future is bright for Plymouth Harbor, located in beautiful Sarasota, which has been consistently ranked as one of the top places to live, work, and retire (No. 1 on Gallup-Healthways 2015 Well-Being Index; No. 14 on U.S. News and World Report’s ‘Best City To Live In 2016;’ and No. 2 on Livability’s 2015 Top 10 Places to Retire, to name a few).

A new attribute for Sarasota is that of  “one of the best ‘small cities’ in the U.S.,” on Condé Nast Traveler’s 2016 list. This list features the top 15 small cities around the U.S. as voted by more than 100,000 readers, highlighting cities that may be scaled down in size, but still offer big-city entertainment and activities.

Plymouth Harbor itself stands as a “small city” — a close-knit community focused on the best in daily living, dining, wellness, and care for our residents. When we look to the future, we realize the definition of “the best” will certainly change over time.

 According to a recent survey by Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, emerging trends in our industry point to items like increased use of technology to help sustain independent lifestyles; the expansion of services “beyond” the walls of the organization; and the biggest trend seen across the U.S.— an increased emphasis on choice and value. Older adults want more choices, more control, a redefinition of what community means, and convenience both inside and outside of the community.

Whatever the future holds, Plymouth Harbor is committed to evolving and revolutionizing care for our residents in the years ahead.

 

picture19Originally from Mexico, Manny Flores came to the United States in 1991, at the age of 13. He has been an employee with Plymouth Harbor for more than 12 years now. Initially starting as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), Manny became a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) one month after joining the nursing team in the Smith Care Center (SCC).

Last year, Manny found an unexpected interest in massage therapy after his wife was experiencing back pain. She tried several different treatments to help ease the pain, but massage therapy was the only one that provided her relief. For this reason, it piqued a curiosity in Manny. “Massage therapy was like a new world for me,” he says. “As a nurse, it showed me a new way of looking at how to help people.”

As a result, Manny began a one-year course at the Sarasota School of Massage Therapy, attending night classes while working full-time. He graduated in December 2015  and is now working as a licensed massage therapist, in addition to his full-time job as an LPN in SCC. Manny offers complimentary chair massages in the Wellness Center each week, on alternating Tuesdays and Wednesdays, from 9:30-11:30 a.m.

“Massage therapy is a different approach that offers many benefits,” Manny says. “Working in the Wellness Center allows me to help different residents and get to know their stories.”

One of massage therapy’s obvious benefits is relaxation, but it offers so much more than that. Not only can it help by relaxing muscle aches and pains, but it can improve range of motion, flexibility, and circulation, and decrease stress and anxiety. 

In addition to his work at Plymouth Harbor, Manny operates his own massage therapy business, Healing Touch, offering in-home massage services. Outside of work, Manny enjoys soccer and working out. To learn more, stop by the Wellness Center on Tuesday mornings, or find Manny’s information in the Wellness Center’s Preferred Professionals Brochure.

 

By: Resident Elsa Price

img_1025In stoic beauty and stately elegance stands Plymouth Harbor, the tallest building in our fair city, her statuesque posture marking a landmark of distinction and excellence. This is home to many embraced as “family” with people from all walks of life! This is where 24 years ago my late husband Don and I found our lovely new home in the tower on the 23rd floor, where the horizon meets the sky in a breathtaking vista!

As a “long-term” resident may I reminisce a bit?     Perhaps it may seem as though you have moved into a “construction zone” with the noise of huge rumbling trucks,  the jarring staccato of  jackhammering from somewhere within, the tall cranes piercing the sky, and the daily rush of the many contractors as they sprint, charts in hand, up and down the floors. This, I note with great satisfaction, is commonly referred to as progress!

Believe me, it was not this way many years ago when a dreary, lifeless color coated the entire outside of the building, including all inside halls and doors of each and every floor! It was not unlike a hotel, when one could not distinguish his room from all the others! Today, with the changes in administration over time, and the inspiration, motivation, and originality of incoming new residents, each floor now boasts lively colors, inviting those who live behind these doors to step out and greet their neighbors with a smile!

Of course, all this did not just “happen,” but rather it took the courage and initiative of many people throughout the years. These “visionaries” believed that beneath the drab, stark outward appearance of our building, it was quite promising that with a team of very talented, resourceful, and innovative people, miracles could happen! Indeed, happen they did!

With careful planning to the future needs of our expanding population, our small, rather bleak dining room was transformed to a spacious, cheerful welcoming area with attractive furniture and lovely artwork on the walls.

Keeping in mind first impressions matter, our previous nondescript lobby became a maze of “staging forms,” extending out from the elevators to the front desk so that a new look could be created, and residents tread carefully for many days under the complex network of scaffolding to get to our dining room! Attractive new facings enhanced the elevator doors, nonslip tile was laid on the lobby floor, and our mailboxes and front desk were reconfigured for greater vision for those working behind the desk. This was not without myriad confusion and provided an unforgettable exercise in patience!

Pilgrim Hall, our “gathering place” for many functions, holds a multitude of memories years past when residents whose latent theatrical talents blossomed as they enjoyed performing “on stage.” These very amusing, hilarious plays written by some of our more creative residents, whose previous vocation had been in the landscape of playwriting,  somehow always managed to project a satire or caricature of a “happening” within our hallowed halls! I was even inspired to participate in several of these plays and found the experience challenging, gratifying, and a real test of one’s memory! It is reassuring to know that Pilgrim Hall, currently undergoing extensive renovation, will provide our residents a bright, comfortable area in which to once again enjoy a multitude of diverse activities and programs.

As we age, exercise and mobility becomes more important, and that very fact is admirably reflected in our state-of-the-art Wellness Center. Careful attention and thought were given to the safety and the needs of residents, and instructors and trainers were hired with excellent credentials who would maintain the highest standards required. The pleasing ambiance of our Wellness Center beckons those who wish to find strength, relaxation, and companionship.

In the near future, we will have the very best that life has to offer with the completion of our new, much anticipated, “Memory Care Residence,” housed within the Northwest Garden Building, with a dedicated focus on creating a loving, safe retreat for those who require that very special care. The living areas will be thoughtfully designed with cheerful colors providing a soothing atmosphere, and will provide hope, peace, and joy to all who enter there, that each may live life with serenity and dignity as they make their final journey.

It is with a grateful heart that I pause and reflect on nearly 24 years in my home in the Tower, living within a vibrant community of people, where I have made lasting friends, and where new companions are warmly welcomed.  For many years I have watched as “Plymouth Harbor on Sarasota Bay” has evolved into the impressive structure we see today.

Maintaining this level of excellence will continue to be guided, advised, and directed by our capable administration and staff who prudently calculate and project our future needs with foresight and transparency, always keeping us well informed.

And so it is, the “saga” of the THEN, and NOW!

Your friend and neighbor,

Elsa Price, T-2301

 

leverone-head-shot-lo-res-3Barbara Leverone has worked as a private practice Feldenkrais Method® instructor in Sarasota since 1996, and has been teaching at Plymouth Harbor for close to two years now.

Ironically, Barbara’s first-ever job was here at Plymouth Harbor in the Dining Services Department. A mother of two, a son and daughter, Barbara’s son followed in her footsteps and held his first job in the Smith Care Center kitchen. Today, he works as a chef in Miami.

Barbara holds a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from the University of South Florida and received an associate’s degree from the University of Florida. In 1994, Barbara earned her 800-hour course certification as an instructor in the Feldenkrais Method. She was first introduced to the technique in Los Angeles in the 1970s while seeking treatments to help rehabilitate from injuries she sustained as a professional dancer.

The Feldenkrais Method is a form of somatic education that uses gentle, exploratory movements to help recognize unwanted habitual patterns and explore other options that can lead to improved function and flexibility. Other benefits include increased ease and range of motion, improved coordination, and a rediscovered ability of graceful, effective movement. “Through this technique, we train ourselves to become more aware and seek better options to perform certain tasks,” Barbara says. “It’s something we can use in all aspects of our lives — from decision-making to problem-solving to our emotional well-being.”

After discovering this technique, Barbara moved from California back to Sarasota and began teaching “Movement for Actors” at the Asolo Conservatory. She was there for 10 years, teaching dance and enhanced movement techniques. In 1996, she began her own practice teaching the Feldenkrais Method and now teaches at Plymouth Harbor once per month. Barbara also instructs both private and group sessions at other local organizations. Her areas of focus include babies and caregivers, active seniors, performing artists, fitness and sports professionals, and those in rehabilitation from a variety of orthopedic, neurological, and chronic pain conditions.

“I enjoy working with seniors, and Plymouth Harbor in particular because they are eager to learn and maintain a healthy lifestyle,” she says. “They understand that this doesn’t happen overnight and that it’s a process and lifestyle change.” To learn more about Barbara and the Feldenkrais Method, visit www.srqfeldenkrais.com, or stop by her October class on Thursday, October 27th, 2:00-3:00 p.m.

Picture13Lisa Bradley has been an independent contractor with Plymouth Harbor for nearly two years, now teaching our Total Fitness class. She is an ACE (American Council on Exercise) certified personal trainer with over 15 years of experience specializing in senior fitness.

While Lisa is passionate about her work with seniors, she first got her start working in television. After majoring in TV production at New York University, she went on to work for ABC’s Good Morning America (GMA), handling the transportation of personalities and guests that were featured on the show. When Lisa married, she moved out to Connecticut and commuted to work in New York City. Eventually, after five years at GMA, Lisa and her husband relocated their three daughters (two of which are twins) from Connecticut to Columbus, Ohio, and, ultimately, Sarasota.

Lisa and her family moved into The Landings and she began work at a cardiac rehabilitation office. While there, she took an exercise class at Bath & Racquet Fitness Club. She had only taken the class two times when the teacher asked her to substitute, as she was the only one in the class who could do all of the exercises. She enjoyed it so much that she began working on her Personal Training certification shortly thereafter. While still working at the rehab office, Lisa was featured as one of the area’s top personal trainers in Sarasota’s Style Magazine. She received so many calls that she decided to work full time as a personal trainer and started her own company, Fit For Life of Sarasota.

In the early years of Fit For Life of Sarasota, Lisa mostly trained with senior clients who also lived in The Landings. Several years ago she branched out to teach classes and work with other larger organizations in the Sarasota area. Today, Lisa holds specialty certificates in Lifestyle and Weight Management, Exercise for Special Populations (i.e. diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, etc.), and Strength Training over 50. She is an avid runner and has participated in eight marathons, including the Sarasota Music Half Marathon and the Boston Marathon. In keeping with her love of working with seniors, Lisa has been a volunteer with Tidewell Hospice for 17 years. During that time, she has been awarded three President’s Volunteer Service Awards from President Obama.

Of her Total Fitness class here at Plymouth Harbor, Lisa says it enhances endurance and balance through standing and floor exercises, stretching, and static and dynamic balance exercises. “What I enjoy most about my class here is getting to know the residents and their stories,” she says. “I love talking with them, and I find the more you take people’s mind off working out, the more they enjoy it.”

To learn more, stop by Lisa’s class on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings, or find her information in the Wellness Center’s Preferred Professionals brochure.

 

WellnessAmiAmi French has been a Yoga instructor with Plymouth Harbor for over six years. She teaches the all-level Yoga class on Monday mornings at 11:00 a.m. in the Wellness Center. Ami is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, where she studied fine arts. Although she practiced Yoga throughout college, Ami first went on to a career in advertising and graphic design after graduating. After several years and a move from Massachusetts to Florida, Ami found her true passion teaching Yoga — which eventually prompted her to travel to Tamil Nadu, India, eight years ago, where she studied Hatha and Sivananda Yoga techniques.

Today, Ami primarily teaches Yoga to older adults. In addition to Plymouth Harbor, Ami instructs at other local organizations, including having taught individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease at Sarasota’s Jewish Family & Children’s Services. Her work with this population inspired her to go back to school six years ago, first to become a Certified Nursing Assistant, and later, a Registered Nurse (RN). In July 2016, Ami received her license as an RN from the Florida Board of Nursing. She plans to continue her work in the wellness industry, teaching Yoga and using her knowledge as a nurse to help others.

One thing Ami enjoys most about Yoga is taking ancient techniques and applying them to everyday issues. She discusses the physical benefits, including flexibility, balance, and posture correction, in addition to benefits that come from meditation and breathing exercises, including increased lung capacity and circulation as well as cellular repair and improved memory.

“Although Yoga stems from Hindu roots, the American version is a revision of wellness with a mix of its original spiritual elements,” Ami says. “My interest is in using traditional Yoga techniques to help people improve their lifestyle, and prevent and slow disease processes.”

Ami describes her class here at Plymouth Harbor as a hybrid class — one that is open to people of all levels, where you can participate while seated or using a floor mat. If you’re interested in learning more, stop by Ami’s class on Monday mornings.

 

Elsa_JimJim Helmich has been an independent contractor with Plymouth Harbor since September 2014, when the Wellness Center opened. He teaches line dancing every Tuesday from 10:30-11:30 a.m. In addition, Jim operates his own dance studio, Ballroom City, where he offers private lessons in a variety of dance forms.

It is no surprise that Jim comes from a musical family — his mother was a Sweet Adeline (the worldwide women’s chorus that formed in 1945, singing a cappella barbershop harmony) and his grandfather was a singer on early television. Jim began playing classical piano at age seven, and as a teen he sang in both the church and school choirs. After high school, Jim moved from Ohio to Sarasota to attend New College of Florida. He was a pre-med student with the hopes of becoming a veterinarian. However, after one conversation with a neighbor, the course of his career was changed for good.

Jim’s neighbor was an undefeated U.S. ballroom dance champion, and when he opened his own dance studio in Bradenton, he asked Jim to join him as a dance instructor. Although he had never danced professionally before, Jim says he was a quick learner and received a great deal of on-the-job training. The rest was history. He spent nine years working for local dance studios, including the Fred Astaire Dance Studio, and has now owned Ballroom City for 15 years. He is certified in dance instruction through the National Dance Council of America, and competes in numerous ballroom dance competitions each year.

In addition to social and mental stimulation, Jim explains that dancing offers many health-related advantages. According to a 21-year study by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, funded by the National Institute on Aging, dancing is linked to a number of health benefits and may even help reduce the risk of dementia. The study followed seniors 75 and older and showed reduced stress and depression, and improved balance, endurance, cardiovascular health, and mental capacity.

“How I’ve seen dance improve people’s lives is amazing,” Jim says. “It’s all about having fun, and I try to make each day as positive as possible.”

If you’re interested in learning more, make sure to stop by Jim’s Tuesday morning class. You can also find his contact information in the Wellness Center’s Preferred Professionals brochure.