Ann has been an artist all her life, but she isn’t “a person who paints wide-eyed children and hibiscus.” To her, art is meant to challenge us. “It should create a reaction within people, challenge their beliefs, and stir our emotions,” Ann said. To do this, Ann’s work often references politics, environmental issues, animal rights, and overpopulation, just to name a few. Through her art, she expresses her ideals and opinions on the world around her.

The mediums she works with are just as varied as her subject matter. Ann has worked with oils, prints, textiles, and most recently (albeit 30 years ago) metal. As a metalsmith, Ann uses gold, silver, copper, and bronze to create all sorts of rings, bracelets, and necklaces. Using a torch, hammer, and a wide variety of pliers, Ann sculpts flat pieces of
metal into her desired shape, sometimes using chemicals to distort the metal’s color or adding various stones.

No matter the medium, Ann works in layers, allowing her works to claim a life of their own. When she begins her process, she has a good idea of what she wants to do technically, but it never turns out that way. “I find when a work is too controlled, too harmonized, and too predictable, it’s boring,” she said. She often turns an idea into a series so that she can “explore and develop all aspects of it and bring it to maturity.” Her collections typically consist of 10 to 20 pieces, each piece a unique part of a whole.

Ann comes by her artistic talent naturally, but she has also had extensive academic experience in the field. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in interior architecture, and over the years continued her technical education at six other art institutions. She continues her education by attending workshops, mostly for metalworking. “It challenges me,” she said. “There is always something new to learn.”

Ann has studied with many master artists and has shown her work both locally at the Ringling Museum of Art and internationally.